How To Change Website Name in WordPress

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You may have noticed, when transferring a website, that the URL is still stuck on the old site even though you have changed the virtual host file to reflect the new domain name. Or you may see the URL entirely greyed out in your WordPress portal. This mismatch can happen if you can’t change the URL within WordPress to reflect the new site name. In this tutorial, we will show you how to change the URL through the database.

Step 1: Enter the Database

If you don’t have your database credentials you can certainly grab them from your wp-config.php file, usually located in /var/www/html. Copy your username and password, you’ll need these to enter phpMyAdmin.

/** MySQL database username */
define('DB_USER', 'yourusername');
/** MySQL database password */
define('DB_PASSWORD', 'userpassword');

If you Ubuntu 14.XX and higher, you can visit https://yourhostname.com/phpmyadmin and enter your database username and password copied from your wp-config.php. CentOS users can usually go to their WHM panel and type in “phpMyAdmin” into the search bar for a shortcut into their database.  With specialty platforms like Managed WordPress or Cloud Sites check with your support team to locate your phpMyAdmin instance.

Step 2: Find the WP_Options Table

Once you’ve entered phpMyAdmin, click on your database name on the left, in this case, ours is named 929368_kittens.In WordPress' database the wp-options table has the siteurl and home row needed to change the URL.

Locate wp_options, afterwards you’ll see rows on the right hand side.  The home and site_url row is needed as we will be changing these values to the new website name.

Note:
Search home or siteurl in the Filter rows: in the search box to these entries if not readily visible.

Select Edit in the row of siteurl and home to edit the URL, including “http” or “https” (if you already have an SSL on the domain name). Once you’ve changed your URL, select GO to save your changes.

In a WordPress database change the URL by editing the siteurl and home row.

Step 3: Update DNS

Your WordPress instance is now set to your new URL!  If you haven’t done so already, you may need to set your A record to your new IP address or clear your browser’s cache to visit your new URL.

Changing the domain name within WordPress is simple enough but sometimes code within an nginx.conf or .htaccess file can also direct a site back to the old domain name. It should also be noted that sometimes a plugin, theme or database can be referenced or hardcoded to read an old domain name.  For either problem, the Velvet Blue’s plugin or WP-CLI’s search and replace command cater to the issue.  Our Managed WordPress platform performs name changes automatically from our control panel, as well as core updates.  Check out how our Managed WordPress product can streamline your work.

Enabling Let’s Encrypt for AutoSSL on WHM based Servers

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With the recent release of cPanel & WHM version 58 there has been the addition of an AutoSSL feature, this tool can be used to automatically provide Domain Validated SSLs for domains on your WHM & cPanel servers.

Initially this feature was released with support provided for only cPanel (powered by Comodo) based SSL certificates, with the plans to support more providers as things progressed. As of now, cPanel & WHM servers running version 58.0.17, and above, can now also use Let’s Encrypt as an SSL provider. More information on Let’s Encrypt can be found here. Continue reading “Enabling Let’s Encrypt for AutoSSL on WHM based Servers”

Useful Command Line for Linux Admins

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The command line terminal, or shell on your Linux server, is a potent tool for deciphering activity on the server, performing operations, or making system changes. But with several thousand executable binaries installed by default, what tools are useful, and how should you use them safely? Continue reading “Useful Command Line for Linux Admins”

Will my site be marked unsafe in Chrome 56+?

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Lately there’s been a lot of speculation about Googles up-coming changes to how sites without an SSL are going to be treated. As January draws towards a close we have seen an increase in customers with concerns of how this will affect their site. Both in terms of people being able to see it and how it might affect their search ranking.

This article aims to clear up some of the confusion and to demystify the changes. If you are unfamiliar with how SSL/TLS or HTTPS works please take a look at our article on the subject.

If you aren’t interested in how these changes came about feel free to skip down to: How These Changes Affect Your Site
Continue reading “Will my site be marked unsafe in Chrome 56+?”

How does an SSL work?

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httpVShttps

Every single day 100s of terabytes of data is being transferred across the internet. In fact, based on Intel’s 2012 report, nearly 640K Gb of data is transferred every single minute. That’s more than 204 million Emails, 47,000 app downloads, 1.3 million YouTube videos watched and 6 million Facebook views. We’re talking about a seriously massive amount of data here. So how do we know if that data is being transferred securely? Enter the SSL/TLS protocols.
Continue reading “How does an SSL work?”

Error: sec_error_ocsp_try_server_later [SOLVED]

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Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended specifically for solving the error: “sec_error_ocsp_try_server_later”.
  • This error can be displayed anytime a user visits a secure website using the https:// protocol in Firefox or Internet Explorer. It does not indicate a problem with the site itself, but occurs due to a change in the method these specific browsers use to check for revoked SSL certificates.
  • We’ll be logging into WebHost Manager as root to resolve the error.

Continue reading “Error: sec_error_ocsp_try_server_later [SOLVED]”

How to Install Nginx on Ubuntu 15.04

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nginx is a free, open source, high-performance web server. Need HTTP and HTTPS but don’t want to run Apache? Then nginx may be your next go-to, at least for Linux.

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended specifically for installing nginx on Ubuntu 15.04.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Self Managed Ubuntu 15.04 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

Continue reading “How to Install Nginx on Ubuntu 15.04”

How to Install Nginx on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

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nginx is a free, open source, high-performance web server. Need HTTP and HTTPS but don’t want to run Apache? Then nginx may be your next go-to, at least for Linux.

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended specifically for installing nginx on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Self Managed Ubuntu 14.04 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

Continue reading “How to Install Nginx on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS”

How to Install Varnish on Fedora 21

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Note:
Please note that this article is considered legacy documentation because Fedora 21 has reached its end-of-life support.

Varnish is a proxy and cache, or HTTP accelerator, designed to improve performance for busy, dynamic web sites. By redirecting traffic to static pages whenever possible, varnish reduces the number of dynamic page calls, thus reducing load.

Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended specifically for installing the Varnish on Fedora 21.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Self Managed Fedora 21 server with HTTPD and PHP already installed, configured, and running, and I’ll be logged in as root.

Continue reading “How to Install Varnish on Fedora 21”