Choosing Your Cloud Sites Technology Setup

Behind Cloud Sites, racks full of both Linux and Windows servers power over 100,000 sites and applications. Every Windows-based page is served from clusters built and optimized especially for Windows, and every Linux-based page is served from clusters built and optimized especially for Linux. We use advanced load balancing technologies to automatically detect the type of technology you are running and route each request to the proper pool of servers.

This is a great example of the power of cloud computing, since you no longer have to make a hosting choice between Linux and Windows. Both PHP and .NET are included, allowing you to choose the technology you need site by site.
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How KernelCare Protects Your Server

One of the most important things you can do to ensure the security and stability of your Linux server is to keep the kernel updated. Some Kernel updates patch security vulnerabilities and other issues. Kernel patches are released as issues are discovered.

Unless you are regularly checking for kernel updates, or your notified of a security issue, you may not be aware when a kernel update is available. Additionally, since updating the kernel traditionally requires a reboot, the prospect of associated downtime often prevents the updates from being applied as quickly as they should be.

KernelCare changes all that. Continue reading “How KernelCare Protects Your Server”

What Is KernelCare?

Tux the Penguin with Hotpatching (KernelCare)The concept of ‘Kernel hotpatching’, sometimes called live patching, was introduced to the Linux community around 2008. Soon after groups began developing differing implementations of the concept. KernelCare, one of the more popular implementations, was originally released in March 2014 by Cloud Linux, Inc. Continue reading “What Is KernelCare?”

Where Is My DNS Hosted?

From time to time, you’ll have to make changes to your DNS records. For example, if you change IP addresses, your DNS A records will change. You’ll also change DNS if you want to add SPF records to help email authentication. For these changes to work properly, it’s vital to know where DNS is hosted.

DNS is always hosted at your domain’s authoritative nameservers. Your authoritative nameservers, and therefore your DNS, can be in three places:

  • Liquid Web’s nameservers
    • ns.liquidweb.com
    • ns1.liquidweb.com
    • ns.sourcedns.com
    • ns1.sourcedns.com
  • Your private nameservers on your server or another server you control
    • Ex.: ns.mysite.com
  • Where you registered your domain name
    • Ex.: Enom, GoDaddy, Namecheap, etc.

If you are using Liquid Web’s nameservers, you can update your DNS records in your Liquid Web account interface. If you use private nameservers on your server or another server, you can update DNS records in the control panel for your server (most likely WHM or Plesk, sometimes cPanel for SPF records). If your nameservers are where you registered your domain name, you’ll need to log into your account at that registrar and edit DNS there.

Either way you check your domains authoritative DNS you should always remember, if you don’t update DNS in the right place it wont take effect. This could mean your websites won’t load properly and can cause unnecessary downtime.

Discovering Where DNS Is Hosted – Web

If you aren’t comfortable using your terminal program to look up WHOIS information, use an online WHOIS checking tool.

Discovering Where DNS Is Hosted – CLI

You can easily find out where your DNS records are hosted using your server’s WHOIS entries.

  1. Launch your terminal program. Every operating system (Windows, Mac, and Linux) has a terminal program: use your computer’s search function to look for “terminal,” then open the terminal program you find.
  2. In the terminal window, type:
    whois mysite.com
    and press Enter. Be sure to replace “mysite.com” with your site’s domain.
  3. You’ll start seeing a lot of information about your domain, including where it is registered and the nameservers you’re using.
    Domain Name: LIQUIDWEB.COM
    Registrar: NETWORK SOLUTIONS, LLC.
    Sponsoring Registrar IANA ID: 2
    Whois Server: whois.networksolutions.com
    Referral URL: http://networksolutions.com
    Name Server: NS.LIQUIDWEB.COM
    Name Server: NS1.LIQUIDWEB.COM
    Status: clientTransferProhibited https://icann.org/epp#clientTransferProhibited
    Updated Date: 04-aug-2016
    Creation Date: 05-aug-1997
    Expiration Date: 04-aug-2026
  4. Look specifically at the Name Server listing. In this example, you’ll see liquidweb.com uses Liquid Web’s nameservers. You might also see your own server listed as the nameserver (ns.mysite.com) or a domain registrar listed as the nameserver. This information tells you where you will be editing your DNS records:
    • If you use Liquid Web nameservers: edit your DNS records in your Liquid Web account.
    • If you use private nameservers: edit your DNS by logging into cPanel and searching for “Edit DNS Zone.”
    • If you use a different registrar’s nameservers: edit your DNS records by logging into your account at your registrar.

How to Install Git on Ubuntu 15.04

Introduction

Git is an open source, distributed version control system (VCS). It’s commonly used for source code management (SCM), with sites like GitHub offering a social coding experience, and popular projects such as Perl, Ruby on Rails, and the Linux kernel using it.

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended for installing Git on Ubuntu 15.04.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed Ubuntu 15.04 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

Continue reading “How to Install Git on Ubuntu 15.04”

How to Install and Configure Git on Fedora 22

Introduction

Git is a widely adopted, distributed version control system (VCS) and open source. It’s commonly used for source code management (SCM), with sites like GitHub offering a social coding experience, and popular projects such as Perl, Ruby on Rails, and the Linux kernel using it.

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended for installing Git on Fedora 22.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Self Managed Fedora 22 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

Continue reading “How to Install and Configure Git on Fedora 22”

View the Selected MySQL Database on Linux via Command Line

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended for viewing the selected MySQL database via the command line.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed CentOS 7 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

Continue reading “View the Selected MySQL Database on Linux via Command Line”