How to Upgrade Ubuntu 16.04 to Ubuntu 18.04

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If you are still using Ubuntu version 16.04, you may want to consider updating to the latest Long Term Support release, version 18.04. In this post, we will cover what a Long Term Support release is and why you would want to use it. You will also learn the significant changes between 16.04 and 18.04. Last, but not least, you will also learn how to upgrade your dedicated server from Ubuntu 16.04 to Ubuntu 18.04.

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How to Solve the Upgrade Ubuntu Install Updates Error

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When updating from Ubuntu 16.04 to 18.04 we used the

do-release-upgrade command as one of the steps to get the newer versions.  While using that method the update Ubuntu’s core we came across a known bug that would not allow us to continue with the upgrade. Instead, it would give the following error message:

Checking for a new Ubuntu release
Please install all available updates for your release before upgrading.

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How to Edit Your Hosts File in Windows 10

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What is a Hosts File?

The hosts file is a plain text file which maps hostnames to IP addresses. This file has been in use since the time of ARPANET. It was the original method to resolve hostnames to a specific IP address. The hosts file is usually the first process in the domain name resolution procedure. Here is an example of a hosts file entry.

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[SOLVED] Apache Error: No matching DirectoryIndex

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Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended specifically for solving the error: No matching DirectoryIndex (index.html) found.
  • I’ll be working from both Liquid Web Core Managed CentOS 6 and CentOS 7 servers, and I’ll be logged in as root.

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How to Enable an EPEL repository

Reading Time: 2 minutesThe EPEL repository is an additional package repository that provides easy access to install packages for commonly used software. This repo was created because Fedora contributors wanted to use Fedora packages they maintain on RHEL and other compatible distributions.

To put it simply the goal of this repo was to provide greater ease of access to software on Enterprise Linux compatible distributions.

What’s an ‘EPEL repository’?

The EPEL repository is managed by the EPEL group, which is a Special Interest Group within the Fedora Project. The ‘EPEL’ part is an abbreviation that stands for Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux. The EPEL group creates, maintains and manages a high-quality set of additional packages. These packages may be software not included in the core repository, or sometimes updates which haven’t been provided yet.
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How To Use the Image Optimizer Package for WP-CLI

Reading Time: 2 minutesThere will be many times when you will need to optimize all images in a site media library. If you are familiar with using WP-CLI, then there is a very handy package which can be installed. The package is called “image-optimize” and it will simplify the process of getting your images ready for web hosting.

This package is not for “managed hosts” since the libraries needed will not be able to be installed having without root access and it can be CPU resource intensive.

Preparing to Run Commands

The package for WP-CLI is called image-optimize. To be able to use this package, you will need to login to your site’s server and update WP-CLI. You can update WP-CLI by running the following command:

wp cli update

Next, you will need to install a number of libraries that the package uses to optimizes jpeg, png and gif images with these commands:

sudo apt-get install jpegoptim
sudo apt-get install optipng
sudo apt-get install pngquant
sudo apt-get install gifsicle

Now you can install the stable version of the image-optimize package with this command:

wp package install typisttech/image-optimize-command:@stable

Optimizing Site Images

The following are examples of the commands to run after a WordPress core update:

wp image-optimize mu-plugins
wp image-optimize plugins
wp image-optimize themes
wp image-optimize wp-admin
wp image-optimize wp-includes

You can use this command to regenerate all thumbnails on a site.

wp media regenerate --yes
You may need to limit how many images that image-optimize will process in a single back. To limit the batch size,  you just need to add the –limit flag to the end of the batch command and specify the amount, as shown in these examples:

wp image-optimize batch --limit=500
wp image-optimize batch --limit=1000
wp image-optimize batch --limit=2500
wp image-optimize batch --limit=5000

When using the image-optimize WP-CLI command, server CPU usage may be intensive, so run the batch commands in smaller sizes during the off hours times on your site. You can track CPU usage whilst running a batch optimize command by using htop. You can install and run htop using the following commands:

sudo apt-get install htop
htop

To use htop to monitor server load, keep a terminal window open while the batch optimize command is running in another terminal window. In our testing, the CPU usage was not too high.

1.61GB/3.74GB Memory usage
180M - 3.86GB Swap

Restoring Optimized Images

Before images are optimized backup versions are created, which means that you can restore at any time to a backup file and replace out the optimized version.

For example, Attachment 123 was optimized using this command:
wp image-optimize attachment 123

To restore the attachment for 123 the command to run would be:
wp image-optimize restore 123

You can use the wp media regenerate command to regenerate a specific media file.
wp media regenerate 123

 

Being able to  optimize the images in your WordPress sites media library will reduce the amount of storage needed for your site. Optimization will also improve the speed and performance of your site for visitors, improving user experience and satisfaction.

How to Use the Mail Queue Manager in WHM

Reading Time: 3 minutesThe Mail Queue Manager feature in WHM allows you to view, delete, and attempt to deliver queued emails that have not yet left the server. It can be a handy tool for diagnosing a variety of issues with mail deliverability, such as spotting signs of a compromised account sending spam from the server.

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How To List Users in CentOS 7

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Adding a user in CentOS is a common task for most Linux admins. Users have unique username’s and occasionally you may wonder if a username is in use or need other details about the user (like their group ID). We’ll show you how to see a list of users after logging into your Liquid Web CentOS 7 server. Once you’ve logged in via SSH, you’ll be able to run the commands below and get the information you need. Let’s get started!

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