Update MariaDB from 10.0 to 10.3 on CentOS 7

We recently posted an article on Upgrading MariaDB 10.0 to 10.3.9 on Ubuntu 16.04. We are now going to provide insight on upgrading MariaDB 10.0.X to 10.3.X on a CentOS 7 server.

The article assumes that the administrator is already presently working with MariaDB 10.0.X. It is considered best practice to consult the official documentation from MariaDB prior to updating/upgrading the current version. This is pertinent in doing because it is vital in understanding what exactly is going to be changed, updated, and even removed from one version to the next.

We will start with upgrading from version 10.0.X to 10.1.X, as you’ll need to upgrade step-by -tep to reach MySQL’s 10.3 version(10.0 > 10.1 > 10.2 > 10.3). Please note that yum will automatically default you to the most recent stable version, unless a MariaDB repository is configured. More on that here.

If deciding to place all the version repos in one file, one must specify a differing bracket tag, so yum provides the option for the version of the package being searched for. This is what my /etc/yum.repos.d/MariaDB.repo file looks like:

When searching or looking for specific versions of MariaDB, generally speaking, one can start here. We’ll be upgrading to the most current stable version per their releases page. For the sake of this article, we will be installing 10.1.37.

Following this step, query the available packages:

yum list available –showduplicates MariaDB-Server.x86_64

After the specified repo has been configured, save the file and proceed on.

Step 1.  Set innodb_fast_shutdown to 0

mysql

--innodb_fast_shutdown = 0;

Step 2.  Shutdown MariaDB 10.0

Exit out of your MySQL database and stop your MySQL service.

systemctl stop mysql

Verify that MySQL has been stopped:

systemctl status mysql

Step 3. Make a Backup

You have the choice of backing up your MariaDB instance either through the cp or rysnc command. The best way to grab a pristine copy of any MySQL server is to stop the service completely ( i.e., Step 2 ) and make a copy of /var/lib/mysql.

cp -r /var/lib/mysql /var/lib/mysqlbackup

Step 4. Un-install MariaDB 10.0.X

yum remove mariadb-server

Step 5. Install MySQL 10.1

We found that the best way to install the specific version is to issue the following command:

yum --disablerepo=* --enablerepo=mariadb10.1 install mariadb-serverIf this isn’t specified, yum will automatically update you to the most up to date version of the package.  Once return/enter is selected you should then see a preview of what is going to be installed next:

Proceed to ‘y’ if all looks good and has been confirmed that the version being sought after will be installed. Allow the Packages to install. Once completed, it is time to move to Step 6.

Step 6. Run mysql_upgrade

We mentioned in our Ubuntu article that this was not needed on Debian based packages. However on RHEL, CentOS, and Fedora packages do not have this natively built into its update process. First, you’ll need to start the service.

systemctl start mysql

Next, run the following to ensure the service is up and running:

systemctl status mysql Once run, we should see a similar output, confirming that the service is up and running:

Now we can finally run mysql_upgrade:

mysql_upgrade

We should then see the different upgrades and fixes that are being done:

Once the ‘OK’ status has been seen, you’re free to continue working with the most current version or continue upgrading to the desired version. Follow the above steps to get to 10.2.x and 10.3.x! We hope this helps and as always check out our database hosting product for you high availibility needs.

How to Upgrade Ubuntu 16.04 to Ubuntu 18.04

If you are still using Ubuntu version 16.04, you may want to consider updating to the latest Long Term Support release, version 18.04. In this post, we will cover what a Long Term Support release is and why you would want to use it. You will also learn the significant changes between 16.04 and 18.04. Last, but not least, you will also learn how to upgrade your server from Ubuntu 16.04 to Ubuntu 18.04.

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What are Common Commands to Update WordPress Using WP-CLI?

WP-CLI is a very handy set of commands. You can run anything that you would run in wp-admin on a WordPress site but from the command line. Useful commands which WP-CLI employs to keep WordPress core updated plugins including the default themes which come with WordPress.

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Upgrading MariaDB 10.0 to 10.3.9 on Ubuntu 16.04

MariaDB is quickly becoming the de facto open-source database software to use in development, production, and even enterprise environments. Our very own Cloud Sites product uses the newest in MariaDB as it’s mostly known for being a fork and drop-in replacement to MySQL, which is created and maintained by the original MySQL developers.

Continue reading “Upgrading MariaDB 10.0 to 10.3.9 on Ubuntu 16.04”

MySQL Performance: Converting MySQL to MariaDB

As we explored in our previous article of our MySQL Perfomance Series: MySQL vs. MariaDB there are very few downsides to using MariaDB over standard MySQL. Our high-availbility MariaDBs have proven itself to be a worthy successor with easily migitated drawbacks.  As the last article in our series we will focus on upgrading to various MySQL and MariaDB version on the following servers:

CentOS 6/7

Ubuntu 14.04/16.04

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Upgrade PHP 5.6 to 7


PHP is a programming language that can run with Apache or Microsoft IIS and works with your server to execute the requests that make up your website. 88% of online sites run on, soon to be vulnerable PHP 5.X technology. At the close of this year, scheduled by Dec 31, 2018 security support will end for our dear old friend PHP 5.6, meaning bugs and security fixes will not be tended to and could lead to security vulnerabilities. 
Each PHP version gets supported actively for two years while the third year only gets critical security updates. Luckily, the PHP gods had smiled upon us and extended the life for just a year longer than the typical PHP version before giving us the new year deadline. For all of you developers out there wanting to know exactly what is changing, here’s a helpful migration guide from PHP 5.6 to PHP 7.X.

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Going Live With Your Site in Managed WordPress Portal

Note: The instructions in this tutorial are for the Managed WordPress portal client, these instructions do not apply if you have a Liquid Web WordPress Server Optimized Template account.

Going live with your site is the last step in the process of migrating your WordPress sites into Liquid Web’s Managed WordPress portal. These instructions are for domains pointed to our DNS. To check where your name servers are pointed to visit this DNS checker and input your domain name.  If your name servers point to ns.liquidweb.com and ns1.liquidweb.com you can continue on the tutorial.  Otherwise, you’ll want to update your A record’s IP with the outside name servers. Continue reading “Going Live With Your Site in Managed WordPress Portal”

DNF (Dandified Yum) Command Examples: Install, Remove, Upgrade, and Downgrade

DNF (Dandified Yum) 101: Basic Package Manager Interaction
I. What is DNF (Dandified Yum)?
II. DNF Examples: Install, Remove, Upgrade, and Downgrade

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Information on CVE-2015-3456 QEMU Vulnerability (VENOM)

Overview

VENOM, or Virtualized Environment Neglected Operations Manipulation, was made public on May 13, 2015. The vulnerability is in QEMU, a generic and open source machine emulator and virtualizer that is utilized by Xen, KVM, and other modern hypervisors / virtualization platforms.

Impact

Specifically a flaw with how QEMU handles out-of-bounds memory access, exploitation can cause the entire hypervisor to crash and may allow an attacker to access other virtual machines outside of their own.

Summary
  • Made public on May 13, 2015
  • This flaw exploits QEMU, a generic and open source machine emulator.
  • Allows for an attacker to access other virtual machines outside of their own.
Resolution

A patch is available, and Liquid Web’s Heroic Support has proactively scheduled a reboot to patch all affected servers.

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