SQL Databases Migration with Command Line

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What if you have dozens of SQL databases and manually backing up/restoring each database is too time-consuming for your project? No problem! We can script out a method that will export and import all databases at once without needing manual intervention. For help with transferring SQL Logins and Stored Procedures & Views take a look at our MSSQL Migration with SSMS article. Continue reading “SQL Databases Migration with Command Line”

How to Remove (Delete) a User on Ubuntu 16.04

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User management includes removing users who no longer need access, removing their username and any associate root privileges are necessary for securing your server. Deleting a user’s access to your Linux server is a typical operation which can easily be performed using a few commands.   Continue reading “How to Remove (Delete) a User on Ubuntu 16.04”

Whitelisting in ModSecurity

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Broken down into two parts our article’s first section hits on “how to whitelist IPs or URIs,” for people who are somewhat familiar with ModSecurity but want to know further about the process. Our second section examines why we configure ModSecurity and how to prevent the security of the server from getting in the way of our work. If you have a Fully Managed Liquid Web server reach out to our Heroic Support team for assistance with whitelisting! Continue reading “Whitelisting in ModSecurity”

How to Add a User and Grant Root Privileges on Ubuntu 16.04

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Ubuntu 16.04 LTS provides you the ability to add a user for anyone who plans on accessing your server.  Creating a user is a basic setup but an important and critical one for your server security. In this tutorial, we will create a user and grant administrative access, known as root, to your trusted user. Continue reading “How to Add a User and Grant Root Privileges on Ubuntu 16.04”

Accessing man pages on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

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Having access to man pages on your server is a pretty essential asset to be familiar with. If you’re not familiar with man pages they are documentation provided with software packages on Unix systems. They provide a sort of manual for applications, services and system resources. You can learn more about man pages in our introductory article. By default on Ubuntu based servers this command is not provided, since it’s a great tool to have access to this article will help you get them setup.

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How To Install Git on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

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Git is one of the most popular tools used as a distributed version control system(VCS). Git is commonly used for source code management (SCM) and has become more used than old VCS systems like SVN. In this article, we’ll show you how to install Git on your Ubuntu 16.04 server.

Installing Git on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Pre-Flight Check
  • You should be running a server with any Ubuntu 16.04 LTS release.
  • You will need to log in to SSH via the root user.

First, as always, we should start out by running general OS and package updates. On Ubuntu we’ll do this by running:apt-get update

After you have run the general updates on the server you can get started with installing Git.

  1. Install Git
    apt-get install git-coreYou may be asked to confirm the download and installation; simply enter y to confirm. It’s that simple, Git should be installed and ready to use!
  2. Confirm Git the installation
    With the main installation done, first check to ensure the executable file is set up and accessible. The best way to do this is simply to run Git with the version command.
    git --version

    git version 2.7.4
  3. Configure Git’s settings (for the root user)
    It’s a good idea to setup your user for git now, to prevent any commit errors later. We’ll setup the user testuser with the e-mail address testuser@example.com.

    git config --global user.name "testuser"
    git config --global user.email "testuser@example.com"
    Note:
    It’s important to know that git configs work on a user by user basis. For example, if you have a ‘david’ Linux user and they will be working with git then David should run the same commands from his user account. By doing this the commits made by the ‘david’ Linux user will be done under his details in Git.
  4. Verify the Config changes
    Now we’ll verify the configuration changes by viewing the .gitconfig file. You can do this a few ways, we’ll show you both methods here.

    1. View the config file using cat with the following command:
      cat ~/.gitconfig
    2. Or, you can also view the same details using the git config command:
      git config --list

And that’s it! You have now installed Git on your Ubuntu 16.04 LTS server and have it configured on your root user. You can get rolling with your code changes from here, or you can repeat Steps 3 and 4 for the other system user accounts.

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Installing WordPress using WP-CLI

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WordPress has a great GUI based installation process however some use cases call for CLI! Or maybe you just feel more at home in a terminal, either way this article will show you how to get your WordPress site setup with just a terminal, WP-CLI, and maybe a sprinkle of SSH.

So first things first, if you’re doing this locally fire up your terminal and if you’re doing this on a server connect to it via SSH. Now that you’re in CLI you want to get into the folder you’re installing WordPress to. From there you can get things rolling in WordPress! Continue reading “Installing WordPress using WP-CLI”

How to enable EPEL repository?

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The EPEL repository is an additional package repository that provides easy access to install packages for commonly used software. This repo was created because Fedora contributors wanted to use Fedora packages they maintain on RHEL and other compatible distributions.

To put it simply the goal of this repo was to provide greater ease of access to software on Enterprise Linux compatible distributions.

What’s an ‘EPEL repository’?

The EPEL repository is managed by the EPEL group, which is a Special Interest Group within the Fedora Project. The ‘EPEL’ part is an abbreviation that stands for Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux. The EPEL group creates, maintains and manages a high quality set of additional packages. These packages may be software not included in the core repository, or sometimes updates which haven’t been provided yet.
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How to: Using killall to Stop Processes with Command Line

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Sometimes you may find your server in a state of high load caused by out control of processes. First you’ll want to use a command like htop, top, or ps, to get an idea on the server’s current state. If you aren’t familiar with those utilities we’d suggest checking our our article on htop.

After you have an initial assessment of the server’s current load you will have a better idea on how to proceed. More often than not the load is likely being caused by regular server traffic and usage.

Generally that will mean the load is being caused by a high number of Apache, PHP, or MySQL processes. After all most servers are hosting websites and these are the most commonly required programs to run a website. With that in mind during times of high load it’s often nice to quickly stop all processes of a certain type.
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