3 Tips For Working With a MySQL Database!

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Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended for deleting a MySQL database on Linux via the command line.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed CentOS 7 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

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How to Back Up And Restore MySQL Databases From The Command Line

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While automated backups are important, sometimes you just want to take a MySQL dump of the database prior to making a change to your site. When modifying files in Linux, you can simply copy a file to another name in order to make a new copy. In this tutorial, we will show you how to create a backup of your database (or multiple databases) and also how to restore a backup from either command line or cPanel.

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How To Install the LAMP Stack on CentOS 7

Reading Time: 4 minutesWhether you’re new to hosting websites or a seasoned developer, you’ve more than likely heard of a LAMP stack. The LAMP stack is the base set of applications that most websites running on a Linux server are served from and is commonly referred to as “Lamp”. Rather than a single program that interacts with the website being served, LAMP is actually a number of independent programs that operate in tandem: Linux, Apache, MySQL/MariaDB, and PHP. Throughout this article, we’ll walk through installing the LAMP stack on your CentOS 7 server so you can run a website from any Dedicated Server or Virtual Private Server. Although we’re focusing on installing LAMP on a CentOS 7 server, the steps that we’ll cover are very similar across multiple Linux distributions.

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How to Install MySQL on Windows

Reading Time: 2 minutesIf you’re using a Windows-based server to host your content, you may using Microsoft’s database server product, MSSQL. However, licensing restrictions can make using MSSQL difficult, especially for small businesses. Microsoft offers a free version of MSSQL called MSSQL Express that will be suitable for many users, but this version does have limitations on database size and memory usage. If you need a more robust database solution but want to try something with a lower cost (like a free, open-source database server), you could try MySQL database server.

MySQL is a standard part of the typical Linux server build (or LAMP stack) but is also available for use on Windows operating systems. Depending on your needs, you could fully develop your database in MySQL. Many popular Content Management Systems (CMS) also use MySQL by default, so using MySQL to manage those applications may be beneficial. MySQL and MSSQL can be run on the same server at the same time, so you’re free to use both or to experiment as needed.

Installing MySQL on your Windows server is as simple as downloading an MSI Installer package and clicking through a few options.

  1. Download the MySQL Installer from dev.mysql.com. The two download options are a web-community version and a full version. The web-community version will only download the server, by default, but you can select other applications (like Workbench) as desired. The full installer will download the server and all the recommended additional applications. (You’ll also be asked to create a user account, but you skip this part by scrolling down to the bottom and clicking “No thanks, just start my download”.)

    mysql_installer_download

  2. Run the installer that you downloaded from its location on your server, generally by double-clicking.
     
    Note
    You can use this same MSI Installer to upgrade currently installed versions of MySQL as well! As is typical, the first step is accepting the license agreement, then click Next.

    license agreement

  3. Determine which setup type you would like to use for the installation:
    1. Developer Default: this is the full installation of MySQL Server and the other tools needed for development. If you are building your database from the ground up or will be managing the data directly in the database, you’ll want to use this setup type.
    2. Server Only: if you only need MySQL Server installed for use with a CMS or other application and will not be managing the database directly, you can install just the server (you can always install additional tools later).
    3. Custom: this setup type will allow you to customize every part of the installation from the server version to whichever additional tools you select.

      setup type

  4. Install the server instance and whichever additional products you selected. Then begin the configuration process by selecting the availability level (most users will use the default, standalone version).
  5. Complete the configuration process by following the on-screen instructions. You’ll want to make sure to install MySQL as a Service so that Windows can automatically start the service after a reboot or can restart the service if it fails. For additional, step-by-step instructions, see MySQL Server Configuration with MySQL Installer.

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How to Install Nextcloud 15 on Ubuntu 18.04

Reading Time: 2 minutesSimilar to Dropbox and Google Drive, Nextcloud is self-hosting software that allows you to share files, contacts, and calendars. But, unlike Dropbox and Google Drive, your files will be private and stored on your server instead of a third party server. Nextcloud is HIPAA and GDPR compliant, so your files will be encrypted along with the ability to audit. For this tutorial, we’ll be installing our Nextcloud instance on our Ubuntu 18.04 LTS server. Continue reading “How to Install Nextcloud 15 on Ubuntu 18.04”

How to Replace MySQL with Percona on Plesk CentOS 7

Reading Time: 4 minutesThis article outlines the procedure for replacing the native MySQL®️ or MariaDB®️ service that is preinstalled on any typical Plesk Onyx 11 CentOS 7 server. The procedure outlines removal of the existing MySQL related binaries and replaces them with an adequate version of the Percona binaries. Once these Percona binaries are in place, a typical multistage MySQL Incremental version upgrade is processed to bring the existing databases and Percona binaries to the desired Percona 5.7 version. Continue reading “How to Replace MySQL with Percona on Plesk CentOS 7”

Troubleshooting: Too Many Redirects

Reading Time: 7 minutesThe error “too many redirects” means that the website keeps being redirected between different addresses in a way that will never complete. Often this is the result of competing redirects, one trying to force HTTPS (SSL) and another redirecting back to HTTP (non-SSL), or between www and non-www forms of the URL.

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