Configure Nginx to Read PHP on Ubuntu 16.04

Nginx is an open source Linux web server that accelerates content while utilizing low resources. Known for its performance and stability Nginx has many other uses such as load balancing, reverse proxy, mail proxy, and HTTP cache. Nginx, by default, does not execute PHP scripts and must be configured to do so.  In this tutorial, we will show you how to enable and test PHP capabilities with your server.

Pre-Flight Check

  • This article assumes you are logged in as root and using Ubuntu 16.04 LTS server. If not logged in as root, please add sudo before each command or login as root user.
  • This article also assumes you have installed Nginx. If you have not yet installed Nginx or are unsure how to do so, please reference this easy to follow article
  • This article is tested using NGINX 1.10.3+,  older versions should work, but it’s a good idea to update to the latest version if available before you try to configure PHP.
  • This article will be running php7.0-fpm or later  (as of Dec 31, 2018, PHP 5.6 will be approaching “end of life” and no longer supported.)

 

Step 1a: Give Me the Packages!

First, we want to make sure our manager is up-to-date. Run the following command
sudo apt-get update && apt-get upgrade
You also want to make sure that your Nginx is up-to-date. You can check the current version by running this command. nginx -v
The result should return something like this.

Running the command nginx -v allows you to see which NGINX version you are currently using.

Note
Note: This article is using Nginx 1.10.3. If you need to update your Nginx version make sure you backup your configuration BEFORE you make any changes.

sudo cp /etc/nginx/nginx.conf   / etc/nginx/nginx.conf.1.x.x.backup

This article will NOT cover updating your Ngnix as its focus is for PHP configuration.

You can test your NGINX configuration file for syntax errors with the following command

nginx -t

If successful you should get something similar to the following
Test a NGINX configuration file for syntax errors using the nginx -t command.Using nginx -t should also give you a starting point to look for errors if for some reason this was unsuccessful it will return an error.

Note
Note: Ngnix should have started on its own after install. However, here are a couple of commands to keep on hand.

sudo systemctl stop nginx.service

sudo systemctl start nginx.service

sudo systemctl enable nginx.service

sudo systemctl restart nginx.service

Step 1b: PHP Version Check

Now it is time to check that your PHP version is running and using the correct version. You can do so with the following:

sudo systemctl status php7.0-fpm
You will see something similar to this if working properly:Check your PHP version is running and using the correct version.

Note
Note: If you need to install PHP you can run the following line :

sudo apt-get -y install php7.0 php7.0-fpm

Replace 7.0 with whatever version of PHP is the most recent. You can check for updates here.

Alternatively, if you need to update PHP to the latest version, please be sure you make a backup BEFORE any changes then run the following:

sudo apt-get upgrade

Step 2:Time for Some NGINX Configuration

Once you have verified that both PHP and Nginx are running on your system, it’s time to configure your PHP settings!

From home cd into your NGINX folder

cd ~

cd /etc/nginx
To configure your NGINX PHP settings. Cd into the etc/php folder.
cd etc/php/
Depending on which PHP version you are using the following folders may differ. This article is using PHP 7.0. You can replace the 7.0 with the version of PHP you are using. We are looking for a file called the php.ini file.

On PHP 7.0 and 7.1 that is located at :
vim 7.0/fpm/php.ini

Or
vim 7.1/fpm/php.ini
The php.ini  is a giant file but it’s where you can customize your environment. If this is your first time, it might be a good idea to make a copy of this file BEFORE you make any changes.
cp php.ini php.ini_copy
However, if you are pro and just like to read articles for the warm fuzzies you feel inside, then go ahead and edit away!

Note
First time using vim?  Use the I command to insert, Esc to exit and :wq to save the file. If you need to leave the file without saving that command is :q. Feel free to use whatever file editor you most comfortable with.
Here are a couple of the recommended values for the php.ini file.

max_execution_time = 300

max_input_time = 60

memory_limit = 256M

upload_max_filesize = 100M

Simply find these variables in the file and update the values.

Before Edit :Set the max_execution_time to 300 in the php.ini file.

After edit:Setting the max_execution_time to 300 in the php.ini file allows more processing time.

Step 2b: Default Sites Configuration

We are almost done!  Now it is time to set your default sites environment. Open your sites configuration file. It should be stored by default at the following path.

/etc/nginx/sites-available/default

You can cd there or open it right up with vim.

You want to remove the following commented out lines. Here is an example for both PHP7.0 and PHP 7.1

PHP 7.0
#
server {
listen 80 default_server;
listen [::]:80 default_server;
# SSL configuration
#
# listen 443 ssl default_server;
# listen [::]:443 ssl default_server;
#
# Note: You should disable gzip for SSL traffic.
# See: https://bugs.debian.org/773332
#
# Read up on ssl_ciphers to ensure a secure configuration.
# See: https://bugs.debian.org/765782
#
# Self signed certs generated by the ssl-cert package
# Don't use them in a production server!
#
# include snippets/snakeoil.conf;
root /var/www/html;
# Add index.php to the list if you are using PHP
index index.html index.htm index.nginx-debian.html;
server_name _;
location / {
# First attempt to serve request as file, then
# as directory, then fall back to displaying a 404.
try_files $uri $uri/ =404;
}
# pass the PHP scripts to FastCGI server listening on 127.0.0.1:9000
#
     location ~ \.php$ {
include snippets/fastcgi-php.conf;

#
#     # With php7.0-cgi alone:
#     fastcgi_pass 127.0.0.1:9000;
#     # With php7.0-fpm:
            fastcgi_pass unix:/run/php/php7.0-fpm.sock;
}

 

PHP 7.1
server {
listen 80;
listen [::]:80;
root /var/www/html;
index  index.php index.html index.htm;
server_name  example.com www.example.com;
location / {
try_files $uri $uri/ =404;
}
# pass PHP scripts to FastCGI server
#
     location ~ \.php$ {
             include snippets/fastcgi-php.conf;
  #
#     # With php-fpm (or other unix sockets):
            fastcgi_pass unix:/var/run/php/php7.1-fpm.sock;
#     # With php-cgi (or other tcp sockets):
#     fastcgi_pass 127.0.0.1:9000;
}
}

Step 3: Testing PHP on NGINX

Once you have made the necessary edits go ahead and restart NGINX and PHP with the following lines.
sudo systemctl restart nginx.service
To test your PHP configuration by creating a  phpinfo.php file in the /var/www/html file path.
sudo vim /var/www/html/phpinfo.phpAdd the following inside the file and save :
<?php phpinfo( ); ?>
To test your setup go to your server IP followed by /phpinfo.php in your web browser.

http://localhost/phpinfo.php

If you see the following then kick back and relax because you are all done! Congrats you deserve it!Set up a PHP info page to ensure PHP is enabled on your NGINX server.

Managed WordPress – Frequently Asked Questions

We have collected some of the most common questions that customers ask about our Managed WordPress Hosting platform and housed them in one place.

 

1. How Can I Access the File Manager?

You can access the File manager by following this article. It will show you where to obtain your FTP and SSH credentials to log in to the server.

https://help.liquidweb.com/s/article/Finding-Your-SFTP-SSH-Credentials-in-Managed-WordPress-and-Managed-Woo-Commerce-Hosting

2. How Do I Make a Site Live?

Follow our helpful article on how to launch your site for the world to see!

https://help.liquidweb.com/s/article/Going-Live-with-Your-Site-in-Managed-WordPress-and-Managed-Woo-Commerce-Hosting

If you are using Cloudflare for your DNS, please note that CloudFlare needs to be paused for the issuance of the SSL.

You can temporarily pause Cloudflare by:

 

1. Going to the Overview tab in the Cloudflare dashboard.
2. Expand the Advanced > section.
3. Click Pause.
4. Once the site is live you can Unpause Cloudflare.

 

Pausing Cloudflare will cause your origin IP address to be returned by Cloudflare’s nameservers, sending traffic directly to our servers rather than through Cloudflare’s reverse proxy.
Pausing Cloudflare will allow us to install the Let’s Encrypt SSL certificate on your Managed WordPress site. Once the site is live and has been renamed then you can resume Cloudflare.

3. How do I Make a Staging/Development Site?

Creating a staging/development site can help to create a site on a newer PHP technology or produce new content without making any changes to your production site. If you would like to create a staging/development site before you make any changes to your live site, you can follow the steps in this article:

https://help.liquidweb.com/s/article/Creating-a-Staging-Site-in-Managed-WordPress-and-Managed-Woo-Commerce-Hosting

4. How do I Take the Staging/Development Site Live?

To make your staging site the live site you will need to use our Migrate to Liquid Web Managed WordPress plugin. The plugin will take your staging site and replace your current live site with the staging site. This will take a few minutes to complete; while your files are transferring, your site will be temporarily inaccessible. To limit the downtime, you will want to do this outside of peak hours.

https://help.liquidweb.com/s/article/Migrating-to-Liquid-Web-with-Managed-WordPress-and-Managed-Woo-Commerce-Hosting

5. What is a Stencil and How Can I Use It?

A stencil will allow you to create a copy of any site you have and save it for another deployment without having to redo all the hard work you’ve put into customizing the site. Click on the following article to learn how to create a stencil site:

https://help.liquidweb.com/s/article/Creating-Stencil-Sites-in-Managed-WordPress-and-Managed-Woo-Commerce-Hosting

6. How Can I Increase My PHP Limits?

For an increase in PHP values, you will need to create a php.ini file. (Managed WordPress utilizes NGINX which does not read .htaccess files) To do so, you’ll first log in to your server with your SSH credentials. Once you are logged into the terminal you will type

cd /home/s#/html/

and replace s# with the user listed for the website.

In Managed WordPress you'll place the PHP values in the /html directory.

Type

vim .user.ini

press i for insert and then paste these values into the file:

# Begin PHP Memory Limit
php_value memory_limit = 128M
php_value post_max_size 64M
php_value upload_max_filesize 64M
php_value max_file_uploads 64M
php_value max_execution_time= 300M
php_value max_input_vars = 259200M
php_value max_input_time = 259200M
php_value max_input_vars 9999M
# End PHP Memory Limit

Type Esc, and type

:wq to save your edits and exit.

These values are just an example of what you can put — you can increase or decrease the values for what you feel is appropriate for your website.

7. Why Didn’t My Plugins Update?

If your plugins didn’t update, you will want to login to the Managed WordPress dashboard and make sure that plugin updates are enabled. If the updates are enabled and your plugins are still not updated, please contact your Managed WordPress support team.In Managed WordPress you can toggle on and off automatic updates.

8. I Migrated My Site, But I Only See the Default Install. What’s Going On?

This usually happens when the PHP version is set too high for your site. You can adjust PHP versions by going into in the Managed WordPress Dashboard and under SITE DETAILS.In Managed WordPress you'll select the PHP version of your choice.

9. What Cache Plugin Should I Use To Speed Up My Site?

We include caching, so none are really needed, but these three plugins are the most frequently used by our customers and have seen the best results.

Free plugins:
https://wordpress.org/plugins/cache-enabler/
https://wordpress.org/plugins/wp-super-cache/

Paid plugins:
https://wp-rocket.me/

Install PHP on Windows

PHP for Windows provides users the ability to run nearly any PHP script desirable. Windows can tackle a wide range of software, from your PHP scripts to the many content management systems such as WordPress or Drupal.

Since Windows does not come already equipped with PHP, it does require some additional steps to install. This article will walk you through the process of how to effectively install PHP on Windows 2016 through the use of the Windows PHP 7 Installer.

Pre-flight

Before you can begin your PHP installation, you will need to determine if your server has our Fully managed Plesk control panel, or is one of our self or core managed options (without Plesk).

  1. You can determine whether or not your server has Plesk by logging into https://manage.liquidweb.com.
  2. Once you have successfully logged in, expand your server from the “Overview” page.
  3. Next, look to the far right of the “Log into your server” heading, and locate the word “Plesk.

If “Plesk“ is not listed, you do not have Plesk installed. Manually install PHP using the steps below (without the use of Plesk). If your server has Plesk installed, you can add PHP support through Plesk directly.

Find out if your server uses Plesk by viewing in manage.liquidweb.com.

The following information provides a step by step breakdown of each installation process. This article will provide steps for Windows Server 2016 and Plesk Onyx (if you have Plesk currently installed). Use these same steps as a guideline for Windows Server 2008 or 2012. Besides, the older versions of Plesk will use similar steps.

As with any managed Liquid Web server, as a valued customer, if you do not feel comfortable performing the PHP software installation independently, please contact our support team for additional assistance. Liquid Web support will be happy to walk you through the steps, answer any questions you may have, or complete the installation for you if needed.

Note:
As with any software change, we recommend that you have a valid backup before starting this process.

To install PHP using Plesk, you will navigate through the Updates and Upgrades option within Plesk. This method will automatically download and install PHP directly from the Plesk Control Panel. Listed are the steps to install PHP using Plesk:

  1. Login to Plesk as the admin user.
  2. Choose Tools & Settings, then select Updates and Upgrades.Installing PHP using Plesk.
  3. Click Add/Remove Components.Installing PHP using Plesk.
  4. From the Add and Remove Product Components page you will need to expand the Plesk hosting features. Select install next to the desired PHP version. Click Continue and you will see the installation process finish.Installing PHP using Plesk.
Note:
You should never attempt to make changes outside of Plesk that are directly supported through Plesk (such as installing PHP).

Once PHP has successfully installed, it will require enabling on a per domain basis. To enable PHP through Plesk, follow these steps:

  1. From Plesk, choose Domains on the left-hand side.
  2. Select your domain name.
  3. Choose Hosting Settings.
  4. Under Web Scripting and Statistics check the box to Enable PHP.
  5. Select the proper PHP version next to PHP support.
  6. Click OK.

That’s it! You are now ready to verify that PHP is working.

There are several ways to install PHP on Windows Server 2016 (without Plesk). Since the manual method is more complex and requires manual configuration to IIS, the recommended approach is using the Web Platform Installer. The Web Platform Installer will automatically download PHP and will configure the IIS handlers for you.

To install PHP using the Web Platform Installer, follow the steps provided below:

  1. Connect to your server using RDP with an Administrator user.
  2. Open Internet Information Systems (inetmgr.exe).
  3. Select the server name (under “Start Page” on the left hand side of IIS).
  4. Choose “Get New Web Platform Components” from the Actions pane.
    1. If the Web Platform Installer is not already installed you will be directed to a website to install the Web Platform Installer.
      1. Download and run the Web Platform Installer.
      2. You can now select “Get New Web Platform Components” from the Actions pane and proceed with step 5.
    2. If the Web Platform  Installer extension is already installed, it will open.
  5. From the Web Platform Installer search for “PHP 7”.
  6. Select the version of PHP that you wish to install and click “Add”, “Install”, “I Accept
  7. After the installation completes click “Finish”.

Installing PHP Without Plesk.

Once you have PHP installed, the next step is to verify that PHP is working correctly. You can do this by adding any PHP script to the website and manually navigating to the page in your browswer. The following steps explicitly explain the process of how to create a PHP page under a site in IIS. This process will then result in the output of information about PHP’s configuration. Commonly referred to as a “PHP info page,” we show you the steps needed to create one:

Note:
A PHP info page can contain sensitive data about versioning and enabled components. While creating a temporary page is typically ok, after use, we recommend you delete the page as soon as possible.
  1. Connect to your server using RDP with an Administrator user.
  2. Open Internet Information Systems (inetmgr.exe).
  3. Expand the server name (under “Start Page” on the left hand side of IIS).
  4. Expand “Sites”.
  5. Right click the site name and choose “Explore”.
  6. Within the directory that opened create a file named phpinfo.php with the following contents:<?php
    phpinfo();
    ?>
  7. Navigate to the site specifying the phpinfo.php we created. Example : http://domain.com/phpinfo.php
  8. If everything went well you should be shown a page that displays the PHP version and other information.
  9. Delete the phpinfo.php file we created earlier.
  10. The PHP Info Page shows the version of PHP you are currently using.Now that PHP is installed and working correctly you are ready to upload your code or get started with one of many PHP based content management systems of your choice.

Install Multiple PHP Versions on Ubuntu 16.04

As a default, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS servers assign the PHP 7.0 version. Though PHP 5.6 is coming to the end of life in December of 2018, some applications may not be compatible with PHP 7.0. For this tutorial, we instruct on how to switch between PHP 7.0 and PHP 5.6 for Apache and the overall default PHP version for Ubuntu.

Step 1: Update Apt-Get

As always, we update and upgrade our package manager before beginning an installation. If you are currently running PHP 7.X, after updating apt-get, continue to step 2 to downgrade to PHP 5.6.

apt-get update && apt-get upgrade

Step 2: Install PHP 5.6
Install the PHP5.6 repository with these two commands.

apt-get install -y software-properties-common
add-apt-repository ppa:ondrej/php
apt-get update
apt-get install -y php5.6

Step 3: Switch PHP 7.0 to PHP 5.6
Switch from PHP 7.0 to PHP 5.6 while restarting Apache to recognize the change:

a2dismod php7.0 ; a2enmod php5.6 ; service apache2 restart

Note
Optionally you can switch back to PHP 7.0 with the following command: a2dismod php5.6 ; a2enmod php7.0 ; service apache2 restart

Verify that PHP 5.6 is running on Apache by putting up a PHP info page. To do so, use the code below in a file named as infopage.php and upload it to the /var/www/html directory.

<? phpinfo(); ?>

By visiting http://xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx/infopage.php (replacing the x’s with your server’s IP address), you’ll see a PHP info banner similar to this one, confirming the PHP Version for Apache:

Example of PHP Info page

Continue onto the section PHP Version for Ubuntu to edit the PHP binary from the command line.

Step 4: Edit PHP Binary

Maintenance of symbolic links or the /etc/alternatives path through the update-alternatives command.

update-alternatives --config php

Output:
There are 2 choices for the alternative php (providing /usr/bin/php).
Selection Path Priority Status
------------------------------------------------------------
* 0 /usr/bin/php7.0 70 auto mode
1 /usr/bin/php5.6 56 manual mode
2 /usr/bin/php7.0 70 manual mode
Press to keep the current choice[*], or type selection number:

Select php5.6 version to be set as default, in this case, its the number one option.

You can now verify that PHP 5.6 is the default by running:
php -v

Output:
PHP 5.6.37-1+ubuntu16.04.1+deb.sury.org+1 (cli)
Copyright (c) 1997-2016 The PHP Group
Zend Engine v2.6.0, Copyright (c) 1998-2016 Zend Technologies
with Zend OPcache v7.0.6-dev, Copyright (c) 1999-2016, by Zend Technologies

Upgrade PHP 5.6 to 7


PHP is a programming language that can run with Apache or Microsoft IIS and works with your server to execute the requests that make up your website. 88% of online sites run on, soon to be vulnerable PHP 5.X technology. At the close of this year, scheduled by Dec 31, 2018 security support will end for our dear old friend PHP 5.6, meaning bugs and security fixes will not be tended to and could lead to security vulnerabilities. 
Each PHP version gets supported actively for two years while the third year only gets critical security updates. Luckily, the PHP gods had smiled upon us and extended the life for just a year longer than the typical PHP version before giving us the new year deadline. For all of you developers out there wanting to know exactly what is changing, here’s a helpful migration guide from PHP 5.6 to PHP 7.X.

While the last of PHP 5 closes out with PHP 5.6, this will inevitably leave websites utilizing PHP 5 vulnerable to attacks as well as poor performance. It has substantially reached its infamous End of Life (EOL) title. Switching to the newer PHP 7 versions is not only good for the security, but updating can ultimately save you money. Reducing the cost of doing business by avoiding software incompatibility and compliance issues. If an emotional headache isn’t enough to persuade developers to switch, the benefits will. Benchmarks show PHP 7.x has been tested to run three times faster than PHP5.6!

Let’s see:

  • Faster performance resulting in less memory usage
  • Three times faster page loads*
  • Better for heavy traffic sites
*Performance increase as benchmarked in a testing environment. Other developer’s website performance changes between PHP 5 and PHP 7 may vary.

If you are in a shared environment that manages the OS and framework, then your hosting provider should be sending out notifications of the upcoming change, their plan of action, and cut off dates. Our managed hosting products, such as Storm VPS, Cloud Sites or Managed WordPress, have support teams that can help you switch from PHP 5.X to PHP 7.X easily. Our Managed WordPress product has a compatibility checker built in & one click button to upgrade, yet another reason to love it!


While using WordPress to power your site you can check some vital aspects by going to the
WordPress plugin page and searching for the plugins that you use. Once you find the plugin or themes that you utilize, their spec pages will usually say what PHP version they employ. Also, check out the review tab for comments from users as this section gives useful information. This review tab is helpful for seeing if others have had issues with the plugin or theme and newer PHP versions. It is good practice to look up reviews and see what people have been saying about said plugin. If you don’t see any responses or it hasn’t rated well, then you will want to stray away from it. If you use custom plugins, check with your developer to see how they operate in new PHP versions. The WordPress Compatibility Plugin check will give you a list of plugins and themes that may not mesh well with PHP 7.X.

If you run a mission-critical site its best to do a compatibility checker because blindly upgrading could result in some parts of your page to not function. Checking PHP compatibility, as you would imagine, is a little more in depth but from research online, there is a compatibility checker for VPS servers that you can utilize by downloading the repo from GitHub.

It is worthwhile to note that some plugins may need a PHP module to be installed for the plugin to work. When upgrading the PHP version, you may also need to re-install the PHP module. Fortunately, our support team can assist with installing any PHP module you may need or give the best course of action if the PHP module is not available for your PHP version.

If you are using a Linux VPS the easiest way to check is to ssh into your server and run the following command via your terminal:

php --versionOutput: PHP 7.0.30 (cli) (built: Jun 26 2018 20:34:16)

cPanel:

Note
It’s important to make a backup of your site before migrating to PHP 7.X

Search php, select Multi PHP Manager, will show this screen to show which php version you are using. While on the PHP Version screen you can update the PHP version here by clicking on the check mark next to the domain and selecting the desired PHP version on the right drop down and click Apply.

Search For PHP and Click MulitPHP Manager Icon

Upgrading PHP on Windows

Performing an upgrade to PHP on Windows Server

Keeping your software and applications up to date is a crucial part of maintaining security and stability in your web hosting systems. Unfortunately, updating system components and back-end software can sometimes be a frustrating and a difficult process. However, thanks to Microsoft’s Web Platform Installer, upgrading PHP on a Windows server with IIS is as simple as a few clicks.

Continue reading “Upgrading PHP on Windows”

What is a LAMP stack?

The LAMP stack is the foundation for Linux hosted websites is the Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP (LAMP) software stack.

The Four Layers of a LAMP Stack

Linux based web servers consist of four software components. These components, arranged in layers supporting one another, make up the software stack. Websites and Web Applications run on top of this underlying stack. The common software components that make up a traditional LAMP stack are:

  • Linux: The operating system (OS) makes up our first layer. Linux sets the foundation for the stack model. All other layers run on top of this layer.
  • Apache: The second layer consists of web server software, typically Apache Web Server. This layer resides on top of the Linux layer. Web servers are responsible for translating from web browsers to their correct website.
  • MySQL: Our third layer is where databases live. MySQL stores details that can be queried by scripting to construct a website. MySQL usually sits on top of the Linux layer alongside Apache/layer 2. In high end configurations, MySQL can be off loaded to a separate host server.
  • PHP: Sitting on top of them all is our fourth and final layer. The scripting layer consists of PHP and/or other similar web programming languages. Websites and Web Applications run within this layer.

We can visualize the LAMP stack like so:

Applying what you’ve learned

Understanding the four software layers of a LAMP stack aids the troubleshooting process. It allows us to see how each layer relies on one another. For instance; when a disk drive gets full, which is a Linux layer issue. This will also affect all other layers in the model. This is because those other layers rest on top of the affected layer. Likewise, when the MySQL database goes offline. We can expect to see PHP related problems due to their relationship. When we know which layer is exhibiting problems. We know which configuration files to examine for solutions.

Some Alternatives

The four traditional layers of a LAMP stack consist of free and open-source products. Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP are the cornerstone of a free, non-proprietary LAMP stack. There are several variants of the four stack model as well. These variants use alternative software replacing one or more of the traditional components. Some examples of these alternatives are:

  • WAMP: Windows, Apache, MySQL & PHP
  • WISA: Windows, IIS, SQL & ASP.net
  • MAMP: MacOS, Apache, MySQL & PHP

You can explore these alternative software stacks in greater depth using online resource. The LAMP stack Wiki is a great place to start:

How can we help?

The LAMP stack is an industry standard and is included in all of our Core-Managed and Fully Managed Linux based servers. Our support teams work hand in hand with the LAMP stack on a daily basis. You can rest assured we are at your disposal should you have questions or concerns. To learn more you can browse our latest product offerings.

Managing code snippets in WooCommerce

When working on a WordPress site, especially stores, you’ll likely reach a point where you need something custom. You might want to customize something that doesn’t have a true setting in WordPress? Or, you need to add a custom hook to modify something? Or, maybe you need to customize part of your WooCommerce store?

No matter the case, making code changes means you’ll need to know the right place to do that. In this article we cover the best ways to get this done and some best practices.
Continue reading “Managing code snippets in WooCommerce”

Choosing Your Cloud Sites Technology Setup

Behind Cloud Sites, racks full of both Linux and Windows servers power over 100,000 sites and applications. Every Windows-based page is served from clusters built and optimized especially for Windows, and every Linux-based page is served from clusters built and optimized especially for Linux. We use advanced load balancing technologies to automatically detect the type of technology you are running and route each request to the proper pool of servers.

This is a great example of the power of cloud computing, since you no longer have to make a hosting choice between Linux and Windows. Both PHP and .NET are included, allowing you to choose the technology you need site by site.
Continue reading “Choosing Your Cloud Sites Technology Setup”

Best Editor for Web Development 2017

Best Web Development Tools of 2017: Editors/IDEs and Package Management

The worlds of web hosting and web development are in a constant state of evolution. Every year we see design trends change, coding standards adapt and new frameworks/CMS created. With such a quick pace of change it’s easy to get lost trying to keep up.

In this article we will discuss and highlight a handful of tools that help make web development easy. Whether you work on Frontend, Backend, PHP, Javascript, or even Perl this list will have something helpful.

As a web hosting company we don’t often talk about the tools used to create the web. We’re usually ultra focused on the components that enable us to server and support you; things like: server hardware, Linux, Apache and etc.

We may not support development tools, but we do want to help our customers to build amazing stuff.
Continue reading “Best Editor for Web Development 2017”