Featured Video: Setup an SSL Site with Managed WordPress

There was once a time on the Internet where there were many valid reasons to avoid using an SSL all the time. For example, using an SSL sometimes meant your website isn’t indexed as thoroughly. Or maybe certain types of caching were broke.

It’s 2017 now though and those days are long since passed. Almost any reason to not use an SSL on your site has been changed or fixed. In this Knowledge Base article we feature a video provided by Chris Lema to show how quick you can setup an SSL on Managed WordPress.

 In just under 2 minutes Chris shows that you can login to your Managed WordPress, create a new WordPress site, and get the SSL certificate setup! Doing the same thing manually could take up to a few hours. There’s no doubt that Managed WordPress makes hosting your WordPress securely quick and simple.

To learn more, or signup, take a look on our Managed WordPress page.

Featured Video: Liquid Web Managed WordPress and PHP 7

There’s no doubt that PHP 7 is a lot faster and more efficient than PHP 5.x versions. The reason it’s provides better performance is because PHP 7.x underwent massive internal changes. With such massive changes something has to be too good to be true, right? No not really, but there is something you should know before updating to PHP 7.
 
In this Knowledge Base article we feature a video provided by Chris Lema. Chris shows how the Managed WordPress Platform makes upgrading to PHP 7 simple and quick!

 
Overall, almost every website and application will benefit running on PHP 7. Sounds good, but it’s not always that simple! With big changes comes some breaking changes, so not everyones code is ready for the update as is. That’s why our Managed WordPress product includes a compatibility checking feature to ensure your WordPress and plugins are fully compatible with PHP 7.X before updating!

To learn more, or signup, take a look on our Managed WordPress page.

Featured Video: Liquid Web Managed WordPress and Image Compression

The key to running a successful blog or website is having great content and making it easy for your users to find what they need. Part of providing great blog content usually involves using images and graphics to enhance your articles, posts and pages. Doing so will provide your readers with visual context and can help break up large blocks of text. Using lots of visual elements and images isn’t without its trade-off though.

The more HD photos you use, the more data a user has to download when reading your articles. This can mean longer load times for users, and higher disk and bandwidth usage for your server. That’s why you should always optimize your website’s images since long page loads can cost you views. In this featured video Chris Lema shows how our Managed WordPress improves this with a default plugin.

Website performance is a big deal and we know you care about keeping your site fast. The most common reason for a slow site is caused by uploading full size HD images. So to improve your WordPress sites performance we’re building our own image compression solution. Since building our own solution will take some time and we don’t want you to wait, so we’ve loaded the Compress JPEG & PNG Images plugin for you.

Normally optimizing the first set of images is free and you pay a small fee for images after that, but you wont! We’ve partnered directly with TInyPNG and Liquid Web will be covering that cost so you can use this solution until we complete our own.

To learn more, or signup, take a look on our Managed WordPress page.

Featured Video: Liquid Web Managed WordPress Visual Comparisons Feature

In this Knowledge Base article, we feature a video provided by Chris Lema to introduce the Managed WordPress Visual Comparison feature. If you run run a WordPress, you understand the potential headaches you may face when updating your plugins and themes. Do you choose to update on the fly and risk taking down your site; or do you set up a staging, keep it in sync with your live site and use that to test updates?

What if there was another way? A better way? Chris knows there is and we’re excited to show you what we’ve come up with.

Using our Managed WordPress Platforms Visual Comparison feature we can automatically test and update your plugins for you. This creates an internal only staging environment, updates the plugins one by one and compares the changes. The Visual Comparison feature will only update plugins that do not cause a visual difference on your live site.

When you review the Visual Comparison report for the site you will see the plugins we updated automatically and exactly why we didn’t update others. You can quickly determine the potential issues a plugin update will cause, allowing you to more easily take control of your WordPress site’s updates.

The best part is that with Visual Comparison enabled we will run the update checks and comparisons nightly to ensure all of your plugins stay up to date! It’s that simple, no more compromise between security and site stability.

To learn more, or signup, take a look on our Managed WordPress page.

Logging Into Managed WordPress Dashboard

Note: The instructions in this tutorial are for the Managed WordPress Dashboard client, these instructions do not apply if you have a Liquid Web Managed WordPress Server Optimized Template account.

Logging Into Your Manged WordPress Dashboard

You can log into your Managed WordPress Dashboard account from your Liquid Web account.

  1. Once logged in to your Liquid Web account, click the [+] next to your Managed WordPress server to expand the section.
  2. This will open a login section for your Managed WordPress Dashboard website.
  3. Click Login and you will be directed to your home page using the credentials sent to you via email when your Managed WordPress Dashboard service was purchased.

Log In thru Your Managed WordPress Dashboard

  1. In your browser, enter http://app.yourdomain.com. This will direct you to the login page for your Managed WordPress Dashboard home page.
    Note: In this tutorial yourdomain is an example, please enter the actual domain name for the site you are trying to access.

  2. Enter the login credentials which were emailed to you when your Managed WordPress Dashboard was purchased. Click Login.

Using W3 Total Cache on Cloud Sites

Cloud Sites has a unique infrastructure setup that requires specific settings for the page cache to provide the best experience for a given site. Please use these settings when you are configuring W3 Total Cache instead of any other settings. These directions will provide an optimized configuration for W3 Total Cache on the Cloud Sites platform. This article assumes you have already installed the W3 Total Cache plugin. Continue reading “Using W3 Total Cache on Cloud Sites”

How to Update WP-CLI

WP-CLI is a command line tool for interacting with and managing WordPress sites. In our previous article on How to Install WP-CLI we covered the process of installing WP-CLI onto a server. We did this in a way that the tool would be accessible by any user on the server. This prevents the need for your users to install the tool locally.
Continue reading “How to Update WP-CLI”

Restore Your WordPress Database with WP-CLI

This article is a follow up to a previous article on the process of backing up a WordPress database with wp-cli. You may want to read that article before this one.

In this article you will learn how to restore a WordPress database backup using wp-cli tool. Having this skill at your disposal is crucial for situations where you need to restore a backup in a pinch. This skill can be particularly helpful if you are testing major changes and need to revert back.

Pre-flight Check:

  • These instructions were created with a cPanel-based server in mind.
  • Command line access via SSH will be necessary to follow along.
  • The server must have WP-CLI installed, for installation directions see this tutorial.

Continue reading “Restore Your WordPress Database with WP-CLI”

Backup Your WordPress Database with WP-CLI

In this article you will learn how to backup your WordPress database using the wp-cli tool. Knowing how to backup your database is a critical skill to have when running a WordPress site. All your posts, pages, and more live in your database; keeping backups is critical.

You should always take a backup before any major changes to your site, just in case. It’s much quicker to take a backup now and do a restore if you need to, than to find a useful backup when you need it.

Pre-flight Check:

  • These instructions were created with a cPanel-based server in mind.
  • Command line access via SSH will be necessary to follow along.
  • The server must have WP-CLI installed, for installation directions see this tutorial.

To follow along with this tutorial you will need to have WP-CLI installed. If you have not yet installed wp-cli on your server feel free to read our tutorial here on that subject.

  1. Login to the server via SSH as the cPanel user that owns the domain, or the root user.
    ssh wordpress@198.51.100.142

    In the example we are using ssh to connect to the server. You can follow the rest of the steps even if you connect via alternative means(TTY, a Windows SSH Gui, etc).

    If you login as root you will need to use `su` to take on the user which owns the WordPress site before you continue.

  2. Now logged in (as the cPanel user) change to the WordPress root folder:
    cd ~/public_html

    We’re using a cPanel server so we know WordPress should be installed in the `public_html` folder. If you are not on a cPanel server it will be in a different location.
  3. Once in the WordPress root folder (where you can find wp-config.php) you can use the wp-cli tool. To backup your database run one of the following commands:
    • Backup the database to the current folder:
      wp db exportThis will use all the defaults for exporting the database as a backup. This means it will be in the current folder and will have the same name as the database.
    • Backup the database to a specific file:
      wp db export ../my_wordpress_db.sqlUsing this command will backup the database to a file called “my_wordpress_db.sql” and will put it in the folder above the current one (or `../`). This is done as a security measure to ensure no one can download your database.

Once you’ve run the export command you’ll see confirmation output like the following:

Success: Exported to ‘../my_wordpress_db.sql’.

After you see that confirmation your WordPress database is officially backed up. Now you can continue making changes or updates and will have a way to restore if anything goes wrong.