MySQL Performance: How To Leverage MySQL Database Indexing

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A Mysql Indexing Logo

Throughout this tutorial, we will cover some of the fundamentals of indexing. As part of the MySQL series, we will introduce capabilities of MySQL indexing and the role it plays in optimizing database performance. Liquid Web recommends consulting with a DBA before making any changes to your production level application.

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MySQL Performance: Identifying Long Queries

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Every MySQL backed application can benefit from a finely tuned database server. The Liquid Web Heroic Support team has encountered numerous situations over the years when some minor adjustments have made a world of difference in website and application performance. In this series of articles, we have outlined some of the more common recommendations that have had the largest impact on performance.

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Apache Performance Tuning: Swap Memory

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Before we get into the details of Apache tuning, we need to understand what happens when a VPS server or Dedicated server goes unresponsive due to a poorly optimized configuration.

An over-tuned server is one that is configured to allow more simultaneous requests (ServerLimit) than the server’s hardware can manage. Servers set in this manner have a tipping point, and once reached, the server will become stuck in a perpetual swapping scenario. Meaning the Kernel is stuck rapidly reading and writing data to and from the system swap file.

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Create a MySQL User on Linux via Command Line

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Previous Series:
MySQL via Command Line 101: Basic Database Interaction

In this article, we will be discussing how to use MySQL to create a new user on Linux via the command line. We will be working on a Liquid Web core-managed server running CentOS version 6.5 as the root user. The commands used should also work on later versions of MySQL on CentOS as well.

MySQL is a relational database management application primarily used on Linux and is a component of the LAMP stack (Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP).

Preflight Check

  • Log in as the root user.
  • Have access to a terminal.
  • Basic knowledge of the command line.
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Grant Permissions to a MySQL User on Linux via Command Line

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Preflight Check

  • These instructions are intended for granting a MySQL user permissions on Linux via the command line
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed CentOS 6.5 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.
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Creating and Deleting a PostgreSQL Database on Ubuntu 16.04

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PostgreSQL (pronounced “post-gress-Q-L”) is a household name for open source relational database management systems.

Its object-relational meaning that you’ll be able to use objects, classes in database schemas and the query language.  In this tutorial, we will be demonstrating some essentials like creating, listing and deleting a database.

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Install and Connect to PostgreSQL 10 on Ubuntu 16.04

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PostgreSQL (pronounced “post-gress-Q-L”) is a household name for open source relational database management systems. Its object-relational meaning that you’ll be able to use objects, classes database schemas and in the query language.  In this tutorial, we will show you how to install and connect to your PostgreSQL database on Ubuntu 16.04.

 

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Select a MySQL Database on Linux via Command Line

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Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended for selecting a MySQL database on Linux via the command line.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed CentOS 6.5 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.
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MySQL Performance: MySQL/MariaDB Indexes

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Data in a MySQL/MariaDB database is stored in tables. A simple way of thinking about indexes is to imagine an extensive spreadsheet. This type of system is not always conducive to quick searching; that’s where an index becomes essential. If there is no index, then the database engine has to start at row one and browse through all the rows looking for the corresponding values. If this is a small table, then it is no big deal, but in larger tables and applications where there can be tables with millions and even billions of rows, it becomes problematic. As you can imagine, searching through those rows one by one will be time-consuming, even on the latest hardware. The solution is to create an INDEX (or more than one) for your data.

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