How To Create A Software Install List

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Purpose

The purpose of this article is to describe and explore ways to copy or backup your currently existing installed software titles into a single file for later use. We can then use this file to reinstall the software onto another system or clone the existing software across multiple Linux systems on or across a network. This method also prevents the need to install software titles one by one.

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Update: WHMCS CURL Bug

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WHMCS has discovered a problem in an earlier EA4 Curl Package introduced on CentOS servers.

Update!

UPDATE: This is reportedly fixed in ea-libcurl-7.67.0-2.2.1, so it should no longer be necessary to downgrade. (https://github.com/CpanelInc/libcurl/commit/7ca2bbb724ac54a3c41950c8736076953bf1429b)

Working versions:
* ea-libcurl-7.66.0-1.1.2.cpanel.x86_64
* ea-libcurl-7.67.0-2.2.1.cpanel.x86_64

Buggy version:
*ea-libcurl-7.67.0-1.1.2.cpanel.x86_64

Per https://forums.cpanel.net/threads/cpanel-curl-update-breaks-whmcs-enom-module.663449/ it may be necessary to restart PHP-FPM to apply the changes to the running PHP binaries.

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Top 5 Reasons To Use CentOS 7

Reading Time: 4 minutesWhen you’re considering which Operating System to use for web hosting, there are many options available to you. We’re going to discuss 5 reasons you should choose CentOS 7 and the strengths of the platform. CentOS has been the preferred Linux distribution in the hosting industry for many years, and it was only recently that this distro was overtaken by Ubuntu Server as the primary OS used for web hosting.

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DNF (Dandified Yum) Commands Explained!

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DNF (Dandified Yum) 101: Basic Package Manager Interaction
I. What is DNF (Dandified Yum)?
II. DNF Examples: Install, Remove, Upgrade, and Downgrade

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What is DNF (Dandified Yum)?

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DNF (Dandified Yum) 101: Basic Package Manager Interaction
I. What is DNF (Dandified Yum)?
II. DNF Examples: Install, Remove, Upgrade, and Downgrade

What is DNF (Dandified Yum)?

Yum, or the Yellowdog Updater Modified, is a package manager for RPM-based distributions; DNF, sometimes referred to as Dandified Yum, is the next generation of that package manager.

Do yum commands still work with DNF?

Yes, for the most part DNF usage is very similar to yum’s. Additional information on DNF detailing the similarities, and differences, will be available in the Liquid Web Knowledge Base very soon.

When did DNF become the default package manager for Fedora?

DNF has been the default package manager for since the 22nd version of Fedora, Fedora 22. Dandified Yum was introduced in Fedora 18.

Why was yum replaced with DNF?

Yum has long been considered a poor performer. It was notorious for high memory usage, and the slowness when resolving dependencies. DNF now uses libsolv, an external dependency resolver, and hawkey for resolving dependencies, while yum used its own, internal, dependency resolver.