Fully Managed Templates Now Optimized with FCGI

Your fully managed cPanel server has several different PHP handlers from which to choose, including DSO, SuPHP, and FCGI. These handlers are responsible for reading/interpreting PHP code, then compiling and executing it.

Selecting the best PHP handler for your server is critical to overall performance, but it’s not always an easy choice to make. While FCGI currently is the best-performing PHP handler available on cPanel, it can be somewhat difficult to properly configure.

Since we’re the best Managed Hosting company around, we decided to take care of the initial configuration for you to help make your decision that much easier.

Liquid Web has spent the past few months optimizing FCGI settings to achieve the best performance gains possible while lowering resource utilization and further improving stability. Today, we’re thrilled to announce that we’ve updated our Fully Managed CentOS 6 and CentOS 7 templates to include these optimizations by default!

What type of performance gain does FCGI provide over SuPHP? We’re glad you asked!

To measure performance, we installed a default WordPress site on a Zone C 16 GB Storm VPS, then used Apache Benchmark to hit the server with 10 concurrent connections, and a total of 1,000 requests.

PHP with FCGI and OPcache performed 5 times faster than suPHP in this simpla Apache Benchmark test

With SuPHP as the PHP handler, we were able to get around 30 requests per second. Once we switched the PHP handler to FCGI with our optimizations (which include enabling and configuring OPcache), we were able to get more than 150 requests per second! In this case we saw a 500% increase in performance!

These optimizations are not reserved for new Storm® VPS and Dedicated servers, either. If you have an existing fully managed cPanel server and would like to take advantage of the performance gains FCGI and OPcache can bring to your sites, let us know! Our Heroic Support® technicians can quickly examine your server’s current settings and walk you through any changes necessary to help your server realize its full potential with FCGI and OPcache.

How to Install Node.js via NVM (Node Version Manager) on CentOS 7

Node.js is a cross-platform runtime environment, configurable on Linux, OS X, and Microsoft Windows, and built on JavaScript. Applications, both server-side and networking, are also written in JavaScript. Node.js lends itself nicely to quick deploying, real-time web applications, and is generally thought of as extremely scalable due to its event-driven architecture.

The Node Version Manager allows admins to easily manage node.js versions. It’s a bash script that has the capability to manage multiple active versions of node.js, with functionality such as: installation, executing commands with specific node.js versions, setting the PATH variable to use a specific node.js versions, etc.

Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended specifically for installing Node.js via NVM (Node Version Manager) on a single CentOS 7 node.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed CentOS 7 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.
  • If NVM is not already installed, then visit our tutorial on: How to Install NVM (Node Version Manager) for Node.js on CentOS 7

Continue reading “How to Install Node.js via NVM (Node Version Manager) on CentOS 7”

How to Install NVM (Node Version Manager) for Node.js on CentOS 7

The Node Version Manager allows admins to easily manage node.js versions. It’s a bash script that has the capability to manage multiple active versions of node.js, with functionality such as: installation, executing commands with specific node.js versions, setting the PATH variable to use a specific node.js versions, etc.

Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended specifically for installing NVM (Node Version Manager) on a single CentOS 7 node.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed CentOS 7 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

Continue reading “How to Install NVM (Node Version Manager) for Node.js on CentOS 7”

How to Install the Memcached PHP Extension on CentOS 7

Memcached is a distributed, high-performance, in-memory caching system that is primarily used to speed up sites that make heavy use of databases. It can however be used to store objects of any kind. Nearly every popular CMS has a plugin or module to take advantage of memcached, and many programming languages have a memcached library, including PHP, Perl, Ruby, and Python. Memcached runs in memory and is thus quite speedy, since it does not need to write data to disk.

Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended specifically for installing the Memcached PHP Extension on a single CentOS 7 node.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed CentOS 7 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.
  • Follow our tutorial on How to Install Memcached on CentOS 7 prior to this KB!

Continue reading “How to Install the Memcached PHP Extension on CentOS 7”

How to Remove (Delete) a User on CentOS 7

Users via Command Line 101: Basic User Interaction
I. How to Add a User and Grant Root Privileges on CentOS 7
II. How to Remove (Delete) a User on CentOS 7
Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended specifically for removing a user on CentOS 7.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed CentOS 7 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

Continue reading “How to Remove (Delete) a User on CentOS 7”

How to Install Ansible on CentOS 7 via Yum

Ansible is an automation engine, similar to Chef or Puppet, that can be used to ensure deployment and configuration consistency across many servers, and keep servers and applications up-to-date. Though, unlike some other tools, Ansible does not require a client component/agent.

Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended specifically for installing Ansible, an automation tool.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed CentOS 7 server, and I’ll be logged in as non-root user. If you need more information then visit our tutorial on How to Add a User and Grant Root Privileges on CentOS 7.

Continue reading “How to Install Ansible on CentOS 7 via Yum”