How Do I Set System Variable Path for Python on Windows?

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Python is a powerful programming language that is scalable and uses code that is readable and clear for all types of projects. Python is also available across a number of operating systems, making it a popular choice for developers. If you are using Python on your Windows operating system, you may need to adjust your System Environment Variables to simplify utilizing Python on your server.

The latest installers for Python for Windows can set the System Environment Variable Path automatically if you choose that option during the installation. To verify if this setting is correct, open an administrative command prompt (right-click on the command prompt and choose “run as administrator”) and type the word python, then press Enter. If the System Variable Path is correctly set, you should receive output similar to what is shown below.

python output screen

Note:
Python software installation is considered Beyond Scope Support. This means it is not covered under our managed support, but we will do what we reasonably can to assist. It may take longer for us to assist as the SLA for Beyond Scope Support is different than our managed services. Find out more in our article What Is Beyond Scope Support?

If you receive an error indicating that the command is unknown, but you’ve confirmed that Python is installed and can be launched from its directory, you will probably need to add the Python variables to the System Environment Variables. By following these quick steps, you’ll be able to access Python from any command prompt.

  1. From the server desktop, click the Windows icon and search for “Environment Variables”. Press Enter to launch the System Properties dialog.
    system variables launch link
  2. This will open the System Properties dialog. Click Environment Variables to make the necessary changes.
    system properties screenshot
  3. Create a new User Variable named: Path and Variable value: C:\Users\*yourusername*\AppData\Local\Programs\Python\Python37 (change the variable value to match your actual installation path).
    new path link highlighted
  4. Next, find the System variable called Path and click Edit.

    system variables screen, edit button highlighted

  5. Create a New entry that matches the Path variable that you created. Add \Scripts to the end of the entry (the new entry should look like C:\Users\*yourusername*\AppData\Local\Programs\Python\Python37\Scripts\
    edit system variable path screenshot
  6. You can verify that you have completed this successfully by opening a new administrative command prompt from any location and typing “python” (without the quotes). You should receive a response similar to what is shown above.

Creating a Virtual Environment for Python on Ubuntu 16.04

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Virtualenv is a tool that creates an isolated environment separate from other projects. In this instance we will be installing different Python versions, including their dependencies.  Creating a virtual environment allows us to work on a Python project without affecting other projects that also use Python. It will utilize Python’s core files on the global environment to run, thus saving you disk space while providing the freedom to use different Python version for separate apps.

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How to Install Python on Windows

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Python is a popular programming language for developing applications. The Python design philosophy emphasizes code readability and focuses on clear programming for both small and large-scale projects. Python allows you to run modules and full applications from a large library of resources (or even applications you write yourself) on your server. Python works on a number of popular operating systems, including Windows Server OS.

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How to Use Ansible

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Ansible symbolAnsible is an easy to use automation software that can update a server, configure tasks, manage daily server functions and deploys jobs as needed on a schedule of your choosing. It is usually administered from a single location or control server and uses SSH to connect to the remote servers. Because it employs SSH to connect, it is very secure and, there is no software to install on the servers being managed. It can be run from your desktop, laptop or other platforms to assist with automating the tedious tasks which every server owner faces.

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How to Install PIP on Windows

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One of the best tools to install and manage Python packages is called Pip. Pip has earned its fame by the number of applications using this tool. Used for its capabilities in handling binary packages over the easy_installed packaged manager, Pip enables 3rd party package installations. Though the newest versions of Python come with pip installed as a default, this tutorial will show how to install Pip, check its version, and show some basic commands for its use. Watch the video or see the rest of the article for written instructions.

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How to Install Pip on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

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Arguably one of the easiest tools to use for installing and managing Python packages, Pip has earned its notoriety by the number of applications utilizing this tool. Fancied for its capabilities in handling binary packages over the easy_installed packaged manager, pip enables 3rd party package installations. Though Python does sometimes come with pip as a default, this tutorial will show how to install, check its version as well as some basic commands for using pip on Ubuntu 16.04.

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Using Conda for Alternate Python Installations

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Let’s be honest: Most of the time, the Python version included with a Linux distro isn’t the newest. For example, at the time of this writing, the version of Python 2 included with our CentOS 7 Storm images is 2.7.5, and Python 3 isn’t even available out of the box. For reference (again, at the time of this writing), the latest versions are 2.7.14 and 3.6.4 respectively.

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Using Passenger with cPanel on CentOS 7

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Phusion Passenger is a web application server that can run Ruby, Node.js, and Python applications on your webserver. It integrates with both Apache and Nginx to serve content to your visitors. Historically, this application was difficult to integrate with cPanel servers, which would combine the power of Ruby applications with the ease of management that cPanel provides, but recent advancements make setting up your Passenger module very simple. This easy walkthrough will show you how to add Passenger, Apache mod_passenger, and the supporting Ruby installation to cPanel. Continue reading “Using Passenger with cPanel on CentOS 7”