Featured Video: Setup an SSL Site with Managed WordPress

There was once a time on the Internet where there were many valid reasons to avoid using an SSL all the time. For example, using an SSL sometimes meant your website isn’t indexed as thoroughly. Or maybe certain types of caching were broke.

It’s 2017 now though and those days are long since passed. Almost any reason to not use an SSL on your site has been changed or fixed. In this Knowledge Base article we feature a video provided by Chris Lema to show how quick you can setup an SSL on Managed WordPress.

 In just under 2 minutes Chris shows that you can login to your Managed WordPress, create a new WordPress site, and get the SSL certificate setup! Doing the same thing manually could take up to a few hours. There’s no doubt that Managed WordPress makes hosting your WordPress securely quick and simple.

To learn more, or signup, take a look on our Managed WordPress page.

Will my site be marked unsafe in Chrome 56+?

Lately there’s been a lot of speculation about Googles up-coming changes to how sites without an SSL are going to be treated. As January draws towards a close we have seen an increase in customers with concerns of how this will affect their site. Both in terms of people being able to see it and how it might affect their search ranking.

This article aims to clear up some of the confusion and to demystify the changes. If you are unfamiliar with how SSL/TLS or HTTPS works please take a look at our article on the subject.

If you aren’t interested in how these changes came about feel free to skip down to: How These Changes Affect Your Site
Continue reading “Will my site be marked unsafe in Chrome 56+?”

How does an SSL work?

httpVShttps

Every single day 100s of terabytes of data is being transferred across the internet. In fact, based on Intel’s 2012 report, nearly 640K Gb of data is transferred every single minute. That’s more than 204 million Emails, 47,000 app downloads, 1.3 million YouTube videos watched and 6 million Facebook views.

We’re talking about a seriously massive amount of data here. So how do we know if that data is being transferred securely? Enter the SSL/TLS protocols.
Continue reading “How does an SSL work?”

How to Create a Self-Signed SSL Certificate on CentOS

An SSL certificate is an electronic ‘document’ that is used to bind together a public security key and a website’s identity information (such as name, location, etc.) by means of a digital signature. The ‘document’ is issued by a certificate provider such as GlobalSign, Verisign, GoDaddy, Comodo, Thawte, and others. For more information, visit the article: What is an SSL Certificate?

In this article we’re going to be covering how to create a self-signed SSL certificate and assign it to a domain in Apache. Self-signed SSL certificates add security to a domain for testing purposes, but are not verifiable by a third-party certificate provider. Thus, they can result in web browser warnings.

Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended for creating a self-signed SSL certificate and assigning it to a domain in Apache.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed CentOS 6.5 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

Continue reading “How to Create a Self-Signed SSL Certificate on CentOS”

How to Create a Self-signed SSL Certificate on Ubuntu

An SSL certificate is an electronic ‘document’ that is used to bind together a public security key and a website’s identity information (such as name, location, etc.) by means of a digital signature. The ‘document’ is issued by a certificate provider such as GlobalSign, Verisign, GoDaddy, Comodo, Thawte, and others. For more information, visit the article: What is an SSL Certificate?

In this article we’re going to be covering how to create a self-signed SSL certificate and assign it to a domain in Apache. Self-signed SSL certificates add security to a domain for testing purposes, but are not verifiable by a third-party certificate provider. Thus, they can result in web browser warnings.

Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended for creating a self-signed SSL certificate and assigning it to a domain in Apache.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed Ubuntu 14.04 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

Continue reading “How to Create a Self-signed SSL Certificate on Ubuntu”