Tag: User

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When it comes to the preferred operating system for the backend or server-side of web hosting, CentOS (Community Enterprise Operating System) has long occupied the space. Released in 2004, CentOS is derived from Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and, through the years, has strived to provide a free enterprise-class platform that has maintained 1:1 compatibility with RHEL. 

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As you are probably already aware, everything is considered to be a file in Linux. That includes hardware devices, processes, directories, regular files, sockets, links, and so on. Generally, the file system is divided into data blocks and inodes. With that being said, you can think about inodes as a basis of the Linux file system. To explain it more clearly, an Inode is a data structure that stores metadata about every single file on your computer system. 

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Login errors with Microsoft SQL Server (MSSQL) are a fairly common issue and can be easily solved with some basic troubleshooting steps. Before we dig in, let’s take a look at the details of the error to try and determine the cause.

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Ubuntu 16.04 LTS provides you the ability to add a user for anyone who plans on accessing your server.  Creating a user is a basic setup but an important and critical one for your server security. In this tutorial, we will create a user and grant administrative access, known as root, to your trusted user.

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What is Umask?

Umask, or the user file-creation mode, is a Linux command that is used to assign the default file permission sets for newly created folders and files. The term mask references the grouping of the permission bits, each of which defines how its corresponding permission is set for newly created files. The bits in the mask may be changed by invoking the umask command.

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What Are Linux File Permissions?

Setuid, Setgid and Sticky Bits are special types of Unix/Linux file permission sets that permit certain users to run specific programs with elevated privileges. Ultimately the permissions that are set on a file determine what users can read, write or execute the file. Linux provides more advanced file permissions that allow you to do more specific things with a file, or directory.  Typically, these file permissions are used to allow a user to do certain tasks with elevated privileges (allow them to do things they normally are not permitted to do). This is accomplished with three distinct permission settings.  They are setuid, setgid, and the sticky bit.

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What is FTP?

You or your developer may want to have access via FTP (File Transfer Protocol) to the folders for the project or domain that is being worked on. FTP is a quick and easy way for someone to connect to their project, without having to have full access to RDP into the server. An FTP user will only have access to the folders that are designated to them, limiting them in their own environment so as not to accidentally change other user’s files and file structure on their project/domain. In this tutorial, we will cover how to utilize FTP on a Core/Self-Managed Dedicated server or a VPS server, as well as a Plesk Server.  Let’s jump right in!

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User management includes removing users who no longer need access, removing their username and any associate root privileges are necessary for securing your Ubuntu based Cloud VPS server. Deleting a user’s access to your Linux server is a typical operation which can easily be performed using a few commands.  

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Users via Command Line 101: Basic User Interaction
I. How to Add a User and Grant Root Privileges on Ubuntu 15.04
II. How to Remove (Delete) a User on Ubuntu 15.04

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended specifically for removing a user on Ubuntu 15.04.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Self Managed Ubuntu 15.04 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

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