How to Check Server Load on a Windows Server

Reading Time: 6 minutes

What Does Server Load Mean?

Checking a server’s load allows us to evaluate server resources and confirm they are sufficient for any running application. It enables us to troubleshoot slow performance and reliably pinpoint any server resource that may need attention.

While there are many tools and options available, today let’s focus on Windows Task Manager as a way to help us quickly see what is going on, and interact with applications, processes, and services to identify the load. This article will also include an introduction to Resource Monitor as it can be opened from Task Manager to provide more detail.

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Useful Command Line for Linux Admins

Reading Time: 11 minutes

The command line terminal, or shell on your Linux server, is a potent tool for deciphering activity on the server, performing operations, or making system changes. But with several thousand executable binaries installed by default, what tools are useful, and how should you use them safely? Continue reading “Useful Command Line for Linux Admins”

Apache Performance Tuning: Swap Memory

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Before we get into the nitty-gritty of Apache tuning, we need to understand what happens when servers go unresponsive due to a poorly optimized configuration. An over-tuned server is one that is configured to allow Continue reading “Apache Performance Tuning: Swap Memory”

Why Is Most of My Memory Being Used?

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Often we hear a lot of customers asking why, when their server is largely idle, much of their RAM appears to be in use.

When RAM is not needed for other functions, your server will load frequently-accessed files into memory in order to read them more quickly. When a file is loaded into RAM, the server can access the information orders of magnitude faster than from disk. A modern SSD disk can read files at up to around 500-700 MB/second, if the files are in sequential units. However, RAM can be read at GB/second rates; or even tens of GB/second.

If the RAM becomes needed for another function, these files are quickly flushed out of memory, and the RAM becomes available for other tasks. Continue reading “Why Is Most of My Memory Being Used?”