How to Install Apache on a Windows Server

Reading Time: 4 minutes

When looking to host web sites or services from a Windows server, there are several options to consider. It is worth reviewing the strengths and weaknesses of each to determine which one is most likely to meet your particular needs before you spend the time installing and configuring a web service. Some of the most common web servers available for Windows services are Tomcat, Microsoft IIS (Internet Information Services), and of course the Apache server. Many server owners will choose to use a control panel which manages most of the common tasks usually needed to administer a web server such as e-mail and firewall configuration. At Liquid Web that option means you’re using one of our Fully Managed Windows Servers with Plesk. Alternately, some administrators who need more flexibility choose one of our Core or Self-Managed Windows Servers. This article is intended for the latter type of server with no Plesk (or other) server management control panel.

Pre-flight

This guide was written for 64-bit Windows since a modern server is more likely to use it. There are a few potential issues with Apache on Win32 systems (non 64-bit) which you should be aware of and can find here.

Downloading Apache:

While there are several mirrors to choose from for downloading the pre-compiled Apache binaries for windows, we’ll be using ApacheHaus for our purposes.

Download Here:

Apache 2.4.38 with SSL

(This is the 64-bit version with OpenSSL version 1.1.1a included.)

If you would like to use a different version they are listed here:

Available Versions Page

 

Install Apache on Windows

We will assume that you have installed all the latest available updates for your version of Windows. If not, it is important to do so now to avoid unexpected issues.

These instructions are adapted from those provided by ApacheHaus where we obtained the binary package. You may find the entire document in the extracted Apache folder under the file “readme_first.html”.

 

Visual C++ Installation

Before installing Apache, we first need to install the below package. Once it has been installed, it is often a good idea to restart the system to ensure any remaining changes requiring a restart are completed.

  1. Download the Visual C++ 2008 Redistributable Package and install it. It is located here.
    Note:
    Download the x64 version for 64 bit systems.
  2. Restart (optional but recommended).

 

Apache Installation

  1. Extract the compressed Apache download. While you can extract it to any directory it is a best practice to extract it to the root directory of the drive it is located on (our example folder is located in C:\Apache24). This is the location we will be using for these instructions. Please note that once installed you can see Apache’s base path by opening the configuration file and checking the “ServerRoot” directive).
  2. Open an “Administrator” command prompt. (Click the Windows “Start” icon, then type “cmd”. Right-click the “Command Prompt” item which appears, and select “Run As Administrator.”)
  3. Change to the installation directory (For our purposes C:\Apache24\bin).
  4. Run the program httpd.exe.
  5. You will likely notice a dialogue box from the Windows Firewall noting that some features are being blocked. If this appears, place a checkmark in “Private Networks…” as well as “Public Networks…”, and then click “Allow access.”
  6. As noted in the ApacheHaus instructions:

“You can now test your installation by opening up your Web Browser and typing in the address: http://localhost

If everything is working properly, you should see the Apache Haus’ test page.“

To shut down the new Apache server instance, you can go back to the Command Prompt and press “Control-C”.

  1. Now that you have confirmed the Apache server is working and shut it down, you are ready to install Apache as a system service.
  2. In your Command Prompt window, enter (or paste) the following command:

httpd.exe -k install -n "Apache HTTP Server"

Output:

Installing the 'Apache HTTP Server' service
The 'Apache HTTP Server' service is successfully installed.
Testing httpd.conf....
Errors reported here must be corrected before the service can be started.
(this line should be blank)

  1. From your Command Prompt window enter in the following command and press ‘Enter.’services.msc

Look for the service “Apache HTTP Server.” Looking towards the left of that line you should see “Automatic.” If you do not, double-click the line and change the Startup Type to “Automatic.”

  1. Restart your server and open a web browser once you are logged back in. Go to this page in the browser’s URL bar: http://localhost/

Configure Windows’ Firewall

To allow connections from the Internet to your new web server, you will need to configure a Windows Firewall rule to do so. Follow these steps:

  1.  Click the “Windows Start” button, and enter “firewall.” Click the “Windows Firewall With Advanced Security” item.
  2. Click “New Rule” on the right-hand sidebar.
  3. Select “Port,” and click Next. Select the radio button next to “Specific remote ports:” Enter the following into the input box: 80, 443, 8080

  4. Click Next, then select the radio button next to “Allow the connection.”
  5. Click Next, ensure all the boxes on the next page are checked, then click Next again.
  6. For the “name” section enter something descriptive enough that you will be able to recognize the rule’s purpose later such as: “Allow Incoming Apache Traffic.”
  7. Click “finish.”

  8. Try connecting to your server’s IP address from a device other than the one you are using to connect to the server right now. Open a browser and enter the IP address of your server. For example http://192.168.1.21/. You should see the test webpage.
  9. For now, go back to the windows firewall and right-click the new rule you created under the “Inbound Rules” section. Click “Disable Rule.” This will block any incoming connections until you have removed or renamed the default test page as it exposes too much information about the server to the Internet. Once you are ready to start serving your new web pages, re-enable that firewall rules, and they should be reachable from the Internet again.

That’s it! You now have the Apache Web Server installed on your Windows server. From here you’ll likely want to install some Apache modules. Almost certainly you will need to install the PHP module for Apache, as well as MySQL. Doing so is beyond the scope of this tutorial; however, you should be able to find a variety of instructions by searching “How to Install PHP (or other) Apache module on Windows server,” or similar at your favorite search engine.

 

Things to Do After Installing a Ubuntu Server

Reading Time: 5 minutes

After spinning up a new Ubuntu server you may find yourself looking for a guide of what to do next.  Many times the default setting do not provide the top security that your server should have. Throughout this article we provide you security tips and pose questions to help determine the best kind of setup for your environment.

 

1. Secure the Root User

This should be the very first thing you do when setting up a fresh install of Ubuntu server. Typically setting up a password for the root user is done during the installation process. However, if you should ever find yourself in a position where you have assumed the responsibility of a Ubuntu server, it’s best to reset the password keeping in mind the best practices for passwords.

  • Don’t use English words
  • Use a mixture of symbols and alphanumeric characters
  • Length – based on probability and odds of guessing or cracking a password you can provide the best security after a password gets to a certain length. More than ten characters long is good practice, but even longer passwords with complex characters is a safer way to go.

You can also lock the root user password to effectively keep anything from running as root.

Warning:
Please be sure you already have another administrative user on the system with root or “sudo” privileges before locking the root user.

Depending on your version of Ubuntu the root account may be disabled, simply setting or changing the password for root will enable it with the following.

sudo passwd root

Now we can lock the root account by locking the password with the “-l” flag like the following. This will prevent the root user from being used.

sudo passwd -l root

To unlock the root account, again, just change the password for root to enable it.

sudo passwd root

 

2. Secure SSH Access

Many times, once a server is up and running the default configuration for SSH remote logins are set to allow root to log in. We can make the server more secure than this.

You only need to use the root user to run root or administration level commands on the server. This can still be accomplished by logging into a server over SSH with a regular user, and then switching to the root user after you are already logged into the server.
ssh spartacus@myawesomeserver.com

Once logged in you can switch from the user “spartacus” to the root user.

su -

You can disable SSH login for the root user by making some adjustments in the sshd_config file. Be sure to run all of the following commands as root or with a user with sudo privileges.

vim /etc/ssh/sshd_config

Within this file find the Authentication section and look for the following line:

PermitRootLogin yes

Just change that to:

PermitRootLogin no

For the changes to take effect you will need to restart the SSH service with:

/etc/init.d/ssh restart

You can now test this by logging out of the server and then log in again over SSH with the root user and password. It should deny your attempts to do so. This provides a lot more security as it requires a different user (one that others won’t know and probably cannot guess) to log in to the server over SSH. This provides two values that an attacker would need to know, instead of one vaule, as most hackers know that the root user exists on a Linux server.

Also, the following can also be changed to make SSH access more secure.

vim /etc/ssh/sshd_config

PermitEmptyPasswords no

Make sure that directive is set to “no” so that users without a password can’t log in. Otherwise, the attacker would need only one piece of information while also giving them the ability to get in with just knowledge of a user. This, of course, would also mean they could keep attempting guesses at users as well and very easily log in.

A final caution is to adjust any router or firewall settings to make sure that remote SSH access is forwarded to port 22 and does not directly access port 22. This will eliminate a lot of bots or scripts that will try to log in over SSH directly on port 22 with random usernames and passwords. You may need to refer to your router or server firewall documentation on making sure you forward a higher port than port 22.

 

3. Install a Firewall

By default, later versions of Ubuntu should come with Uncomplicated Firewall or UFW. You can check to see if UFW is installed with the following:

sudo ufw status

That will return a status of active or inactive. If it is not installed you can install it with:

sudo apt-get install ufw

It’s a good idea to think through a list of components that will require access to your server. Is SSH access needed? Is web traffic needed? You will want to enable the services through the firewall that are needed so that incoming traffic can access the server in the way you want it to.

In our example let’s allow SSH and web access.

sudo ufw allow ssh

sudo ufw allow http

Those commands will also open up the ports. You can alternatively use the port method to allow services through that specific port.

sudo ufw allow 80/tcp

That will essentially be the same as allowing the HTTP service. Once you have the services you want listed you can enable the firewall with this.

sudo ufw enable

This may interrupt the current SSH connection if that is how you are logged in so be sure your information is correct, so you don’t get logged out.

Also, ensure you have a good grasp on who really needs access to the server and only add users to the Linux operating system that really need access.

 

4. Understand What You Are Trying to Accomplish

It’s important to think through what you will be using your server for. Is it going to be just a file server? Or a web server? Or a web server that needs to send an email out through forms?

You will want to make a clear outline of what you will be using the server for so you can build it to suit those specific needs. It’s best to only build the server with the services that it will require. When you end up putting extra services that are not needed you run the risk of having outdated software which will only add more vulnerability to the server.

Every component and service you run will need to be secured to it’s best practices. For example, if you’re strictly running a static site, you don’t want to expose vulnerabilities due to an outdated email service.

 

5. Keep the File System Up-To-Date

You will want to make sure your server stays up to date with the latest security patches. While a server can run for a while without much maintenance and things will “just work” you will want to be sure not to adapt a “set it and forget it” mentality.

Regular updates on a Ubuntu server can make sure the system stays secure and up to date. You can use the following to do that.

sudo apt-get update

While installing an Ubuntu server is a great way to learn how to work with a Linux it’s a good idea to learn in an environment that is safe. Furthermore, it’s best not to expose the server to the Internet until you are ready.

A great way to get started is at home where you can access the server from your own network without allowing access to the server through the Internet or your home router.

If and when you do deploy a Ubuntu server you’ll want to keep the above five things in mind. It’s important to know the configuration of the server once it’s deployed so you know what type of access the public can get to and what yet needs to be hardened.

Enjoy learning and don’t be afraid to break something in your safe environment, as the experience can be a great teacher when it’s time to go live.

How Do I Secure My Linux Server?

Reading Time: 6 minutes

Our last article on Ubuntu security suggestions touched on the importance of passwords, user roles, console security, and firewalls. We continue with our last article and while the recommendations below are not unique to Ubuntu specifically (nearly all discussed are considered best practice for any Linux server) but they should be an important consideration in securing your server. Continue reading “How Do I Secure My Linux Server?”

Best Practices for Security on Your New Ubuntu Server: Users, Console and Firewall

Reading Time: 4 minutes

Thank you for taking the time to review this important information. You will find this guide broken down into six major sections that coincide with Ubuntu’s security policy guide. The major topics we talk on throughout these articles are as follows:

User Management

User management is one of the most important aspects of any security plan. Balancing your users’ access requirements against their everyday needs, versus the overall security of the server will demand a clear view of those goals to ensure users have the tools they need to get the job done as well as protect the other users’ privacy and confidentiality. We have three types or levels of user access:

  1. Root: This is the main administrator of the server. The root account has full access to everything on the server.  The root user can lock down or, loosen users roles, set file permissions, and ownership, limit folder access, install and remove services or applications, repartition drives and essentially modify any area of the server’s infrastructure. The phrase “with great power comes great responsibility” comes to mind in reference to the root user.
  2. A sudoer (user): This is a user who has been granted special access to a Linux application called sudo.  The “sudoer” user has elevated rights to run a function or program as another user. This user will be included in a specific user group called the sudo group. The rules this user has access to are defined within the “visudo” file which defines and limits their access and can only be initially modified by the root user.
  3. A user: This is a regular user who has been set up using the adduser command, given access to and, who owns the files and folders within the user /home/user/ directory as defined by the basic settings in the /etc/skel/.profile file.

Linux can add an extreme level of granularity to defined user security levels. This allows for the server’s (root user) administrator to outline and delineate as many roles and user types as needed to meet the requirements set forth by the server owner and its assigned task.

 

Enforce Strong Passwords

Because passwords are one of the mainstays in the user’s security arsenal, enforcing strong passwords are a must. In order to enact this guideline, we can modify the file responsible for this setting located here:  /etc/pam.d/common-password.

To enact this guideline, we can modify the file responsible for this setting by using the ‘chage’ command:

chage -m 90 username

This command simply states that the user’s password must be changed every 90 days.

/lib/security/$ISA/pam_cracklib.so retry=3 minlen=8 lcredit=-1 ucredit=-2 dcredit=-2 ocredit=-1

 

Restrict Use of Old Passwords

Open ‘/etc/pam.d/common-password‘ file under Ubuntu/Debian/Linux Mint.
vi /etc/pam.d/common-passwordAdd the following line to ‘auth‘ section.

auth        sufficient  pam_unix.so likeauth nullok

Add the following line to ‘password‘ section to disallow a user from re-using last five of his or her passwords.

sufficient    pam_unix.so nullok use_authtok md5 shadow remember=5Only the last five passwords are remembered by the server. If you tried to use any of five old passwords, you would get an error like:
Password has been already used. Choose another.

 

Checking Accounts for Empty Passwords

Any account having an empty password means its opened for unauthorized access to anyone on the web and it’s a part of security within a Linux server. So, you must make sure all accounts have strong passwords, and no one has any authorized access. Empty password accounts are security risks, and that can be easily hackable. To check if there were any accounts with an empty password, use the following command.

cat /etc/shadow | awk -F: '($2==""){print $1}'

 

What is Console Security?

Console security simply implies that limiting access to the physical server itself is key to ensuring that only those with the proper access can reach the server. Anyone who has access to the server can gain entry to the server, reboot it, remove hard drives, disconnect cables or even power down the server! To curtail malicious actors with harmful intent, we can make sure that servers are kept in a secure location. Another step we can take is to disable the Ctrl+Alt+Delete function. To accomplish this run the following commands:

systemctl mask ctrl-alt-del.target
systemctl daemon-reload
This forces attackers to take more drastic measures to access the server and also limits accidental reboots.

What is UFW?

UFW is simply a front end for a program called iptables which is the actual firewall itself and, UFW provides an easy means to set up and design the needed protection. Ubuntu provides a default firewall frontend called UFW (Uncomplicated firewall). This is another line of defense to keep unwanted or malicious traffic from actually breaching the internal processes of the server.

 

Firewall Logs

The firewall log is a log file which creates and stores information about attempts and other connections to the server. Monitoring these logs for unusual activity and/or attempts to access the server maliciously will aid in securing the server.

When using UFW, you can enable logging by entering the following command in a terminal:

ufw logging on

To disable logging, simply run the following command:

ufw logging off

To learn more about firewalls, visit our Knowledge Base articles.

We’ve covered the importance of passwords, user roles, console security and firewalls all of which are imperative to protecting your Linux server. Let’s continue onto the next article where we’ll cover AppArmor, certificates, eCryptfs and Encrypted LVM.

 

Troubleshooting: Locked Out of RDP

Reading Time: 3 minutes

How Do I Get Back Into RDP?

You may be working from a local machine that has an IP that is not scoped on that RDP port, making it impossible for you to gain remote access to add the IP address to the RDP rule’s scope. Do not fret; there is a simple and quick way to add your IP to the RDP scoping (or any others entities such as MySQL or MSSQL) right through your Plesk interface in your local browser. Continue reading “Troubleshooting: Locked Out of RDP”

How To Set Up FTP for Windows

Reading Time: 5 minutes

What is FTP?

You or your developer may want to have access via FTP (File Transfer Protocol) to the folders for the project or domain that is being worked on. FTP is a quick and easy way for someone to connect to their project, without having to have full access via RDP to the server. An FTP user also only has access to the folders that are designated to them, keeping them in their own environment so as not to accidentally change other user’s files and file structure on their project/domain. Here we will cover how to utilize FTP on a Core/Self-Managed Dedicated or VPS Server, as well as a Plesk Server.  Let’s jump right in!

 

Enabling FTP Services

The first thing that you need to check before creating an FTP user is to enable FTP on your server. To do that on a Core/Self-Managed server, we need to RDP to the server and open Server Manager.

Once the server manager is open, in the top right corner, there are a few options: Manage, Tools, View, and Help. We want to click on Manage, which will show a drop-down menu. At the top of the menu, click on the option Add Roles and Features.

Once you have the Add Roles and Features Wizard up, click Next until you are at the Server Selection.

Make sure your server is highlighted, by default, it should be. If so, you can click Next which brings you to Server Roles.

Server Roles are where you will find the features your server can have enabled separately, depending on your needs. We aren’t looking for anything but FTP at this time, so we won’t cover all of the features and services we find here. FTP services are going to be found under the role Web Server. Click on the carrot next to Web Server. There are 3 different options with checkboxes; Web Server, FTP Server, and Management Tools. Dropping down the FTP Feature will show the available FTP features.

If all of these are already checked, you can skip ahead to the Adding and Assigning FTP Users section of this help article. However, if these are not checked, go ahead and check FTP Server and FTP Service. If your users plan on using ASP.NET services or IIS Manager, you will want to make sure you check FTP Extensibility.

Once you have the FTP features selected, click on Next a couple of times until you get to the Confirmation page. At the top, you will see an option to “restart the destination server automatically if needed. For installing FTP Services, a restart is not needed. We can leave this box unchecked and click on Install. This install process shouldn’t take too long.

 

Adding an FTP User Account

Before we add an FTP site, we need to set up a user with some credentials. We do this by accessing Computer Management.On Windows 2012 and up, we can do this by right-clicking the Start Menu button, and selecting Computer Management. Here, under System Tools, if we click the drop down carrot, we will see the Local Users and Groups section. Double-click on Users and a list of all the Local Users will formulate. On the far right of the Computer Management, once we have navigated to Users, we see a More Actions and will need to click on that to add a New User.

Clicking on New User will pop up a simple interface that asks for the user name, the user’s full name, a description for that user that serves as a description for you, the administrator, to recognize the purpose of this user. Fill out this information accordingly and type in a password for this user. Under Confirm Password, we see that by default “User must change password at next logon” is selected. Because this is strictly for FTP, we will uncheck that and check “User cannot change password” and “Password never expires”. Considering the FTP user will only have access to the destination you allow, it is not necessary to change the password.

 

Adding an FTP Site

Now that FTP Services are installed and a user is created, we need to head on over to the IIS Manager. This can be found in the Start Menu, or by clicking on Tools in Server Manager as we did before, but clicking on Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager.

Here is the IIS Manager, we need to create the FTP site that you will want this specific user to have access to. We do this by clicking on the drop-down carrot next to the server name, and then right-clicking on the folder that says “Sites“.

A menu will pop up, with the option to Add FTP Site. Enter the name you wish to give this FTP site. Select a Physical path, where you want the user for this FTP site to have access. Do this by either typing in the direct path, or selecting the 3 dots next to the entry bar and physically selecting the folder you wish to assign this FTP site.

Clicking next will bring you to Bindings and SSL settings. If you have any specific IP address that is assigned to a domain that is being used for this FTP Service, you need to make sure that the IP address is selected by dropping down the bar.

If all sites are taking advantage of Windows SNI (Server Name Identification) than you can leave this set to All Unassigned, if you wish to use a different port than the default FTP port, go ahead and type that in under Port. But if this is just a basic FTP instance for everyday purposes, go ahead and leave that port at the default 21. Next, you want to make sure that “Start FTP Site automatically” is selected. Unless of course, you want to manually allow the user to connect to their FTP site only when you designate by starting the page in IIS. Select No SSL and click Next for this FTP Site. In this tutorial, we will not be covering setting up an SSL for this specific FTP Site. If you do already have an SSL that you have added to the server for this purpose, you need to make sure that Allow or Require under SSL is checked, and select your SSL on the drop down bar labeled SSL Certificate.

Now we have been brought to the Authentication and Authorization section. Here at the top are two options for Authentication. Make sure that both boxes are checked. Finally, we have the Authorization section where we would select the groups or users we want to allow to be able to log into this FTP Site.

 

Setting Up the Windows Firewall

Now that we have the FTP site all set up and ready to go, we do need to set up the firewall rules. Open up your firewall by clicking on Start, scrolling to Windows Administrative Tools, and clicking on Windows Firewall with Advanced Security.

We need to set some rules on the Inbound Rules section, so click on that first. It’s in the top right corner. After clicking on Inbound Rules in the top right corner under Actions, you will see a section called Inbound Rules. Under that category should be New Rule.

You may have to click on the arrow next to Inbound Rules to see this. Click on the New Rule

And you will be selecting the Rule Type. For FTP we will be using Port, so click on that and Next. Now you will see Protocol and Ports. For Protocol, use the setting TCP. For Specific local ports type 21, 5001-5051 and click on Next.

Now we have the Action section. By default, “Allow the connection” is selected. Keep this the way it is and press Next. Now you will be prompted for when this rule will apply.

We want it always to apply so keep each network connection type box checked. There are three: Domain, Private, and Public. Click Next, and you will be naming the firewall rule. We suggest just naming it FTP Connection or something of the sort.

You should be all set. Go ahead and log into another computer, use your favorite FTP client (such as Filezilla), enter the IP address as a host, and your newly created username and password, port number, and click connect. You are now connected FTP to your designated pathway on your server.

 

FTP on a Plesk Server

This process is a lot faster and much simpler. Here are a couple links in regards to setting it up on a Plesk Windows Server.

https://help.liquidweb.com/s/article/Creating-FTP-Users

https://help.liquidweb.com/s/article/Uploading-Files-Using-FTP-in-Plesk

You did it! You have successfully set up an FTP site so that you or the developers can now edit, copy, and remove files from their designated folders smoothly.

Windows Firewall Basics

Reading Time: 6 minutes

A firewall is a program installed on your computer or a piece of hardware that uses a rule set to block or allow access to a computer, server or network. It separates your internal network from the external network (the Internet).

Firewalls can permit traffic to be routed through a specific port to a program or destination while blocking other malicious traffic. A firewall can be a hardware, software, or a blending of both.

Continue reading “Windows Firewall Basics”

Plesk to Plesk Migration

Reading Time: 9 minutes

Migrating from one Plesk installation to another is easy with the Plesk Migrator Tool! The Plesk team has done a great job creating an easy to use interface for migrating entire installations of Plesk to a new server.

If you need to move files, users, subscriptions, FTP accounts, mail and DNS servers setup through Plesk, this guide will help you successfully navigate the process and come out victorious!

We will be splitting this tutorial into three sections:

Continue reading “Plesk to Plesk Migration”

Install vsftpd on Ubuntu 16.04

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Installing vsftpd allows you to upload files to a server, the concept is comparable to that of Google Drive.  When you invite specified users to your Google Drive they can create, delete, upload and download files all behind a secure login. Vsftpd is excellent for company’s looking for an alternative to Google Drive or for anyone who wants to create a robust server. This “Very Secure File Transfer Protocol Daemon” is favored for its security and speed and we’ll be showing you how to install vsftpd on an Ubuntu 16.04 LTS server.

 

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended specifically for installing vsftpd on Ubuntu 16.04.
  • You must be logged in via SSH as the root user to follow these directions.
Warning:
FTP data is insecure; traffic is not encrypted, and all transmissions are clear text, including usernames, passwords, commands, and data. Consider securing your FTP connection (FTPS).

Step 1: Updating Apt-Get

As a matter of best practices we update apt-get with the following command:

apt-get update

Step 2: Installing Vsftpd

One command allows us to install vsftpd very easily.

apt-get -y install vsftpd

Step 3: Configuring Vsftpd

We’ve installed vsftpd, and now we will edit some options that will help us to protect the FTP environment and enable the environment for utilization. Enter the configuration file using the text editor of your choice.

vim /etc/vsftpd.conf

Change the values in the config file to match the values below and lastly, save exit by typing

:wq

 

anonymous_enable=NO
local_enable=YES
write_enable=YES
chroot_local_user=YES
ascii_upload_enable=YES
ascii_download_enable=YES

 

Click Here for a Further Explaination on Each Directive
Anonymous_enable: Prohibit anonymous internet users access files from your FTP. Change anonymous_enable section to NO.

Local_enable: If you have created users you can allow these users to log in by changing the local_enable setting to YES.

Write_enabled: Enable users the ability to write the directory, allowing them to upload files. Uncomment by removing the # in from of write_enabled:

Chroot jail: You can “chroot jail” local users, restricting them to their home directories (/home/username) and prohibiting access to any other part of the server. Choosing this is optional but if you state YES follow the steps in Step 4 for removing write privileges and making their own directory for uploads. If you select NO, the user will have access to other directories.

Step 4: Editing Permissions for a User

If you have an existing or new user that is not able to connect, try removing write privileges to their directory:

chmod a-w /home/username

Step 5: Creating the User a Directory

Create a directory just for FTP, in this case, and we are name it files. Afterward, this user will be able to upload and create files within the files folder:

mkdir /home/username/files

Step 6: Accepting FTP Traffic to Ports

There are a few ways to open ports within a server, below is one way of opening port 20 and 21 for FTP users to connect.

Note
Directly passing iptable commands, like below, can break some firewalls. In whichever method you choose to edit your iptables ensure that port 20 and 21 are open.

iptables -I INPUT 1 -p tcp --dport=20 -j ACCEPT

iptables -I INPUT 1 -p tcp --dport=21 -j ACCEPT

Step 7: Restarting the Vsftpd Service

Restarting vsftpd enables changes to the file (step 3) to be recognized.

service vsftpd restart

Step 8: Verifying Vsftpd

Now for a little fun, let’s connect to our FTP to verify it is working.

ftp 79.212.205.191

Example Output:

ftp 79.212.205.191
Connected to 79.212.205.191.
220 Welcome to FTP!
Name (79.212.205.191:terminalusername):<enter your FTP user>

You’ll also be able to connect via an FTP client, like Filezilla, using the IP address of your hostname and leaving the port number blank.  Take it for a spin and try to upload a file or write a file. If you enabled the chroot jail option, the user should not be able to go to any other parent directory.