How to Install TensorFlow on CentOS

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In this tutorial, we are going to take a look at how to get started with TensorFlow on CentOS. We will be covering two methods. First, we will take a look at installing TensorFlow in a Python virtual environment via the Python package manager pip. After that, we will walk through installing TensorFlow via the Anaconda package manager. Finally, we will cover building a TensorFlow pip package from source.

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Siege: How to Benchmark Your Server

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What is Siege?

Siege is a remote host http/https regression testing and benchmarking tool that can be used to test the performance of your web server under duress to see how it will perform. 

It allows an admin or server owner to simulate hits or connections to a web server with a preconfigured number of concurrent connections from simulated users. By utilizing this software, these simulated users target the server and place it “under siege,” hence the name. The timeframe of the siege is measured in: 

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How To Create A Software Install List

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Purpose

The purpose of this article is to describe and explore ways to copy or backup your currently existing installed software titles into a single file for later use. We can then use this file to reinstall the software onto another system or clone the existing software across multiple Linux systems on or across a network. This method also prevents the need to install software titles one by one.

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How To Install Software From Source on Ubuntu

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In this article, we are going to cover the available options for installing software on Ubuntu. By the end of this article, you’ll be equipped with an arsenal of tools for installing the exact software you want on your Ubuntu server! We will be installing three different software packages from source, deb, and flatpack.

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Installing Linux Software Via The Commandline

Reading Time: 7 minutes

Installing Linux software from the commandline can save you time, money, and make life easy – if you know what you’re doing! This article is a brief overview of how the commandline operates on Linux distributions.

Once we have learned how the commandline works, we will move on to installing, removing, and updating our software packages VIA the commandline with yum. To get started, let’s begin by making sure we understand what the commandline does.

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How To Install the LAMP Stack on CentOS 7

Reading Time: 4 minutesWhether you’re new to hosting websites or a seasoned developer, you’ve more than likely heard of a LAMP stack. The LAMP stack is the base set of applications that most websites running on a Linux server are served from and is commonly referred to as “Lamp”. Rather than a single program that interacts with the website being served, LAMP is actually a number of independent programs that operate in tandem: Linux, Apache, MySQL/MariaDB, and PHP. Throughout this article, we’ll walk through installing the LAMP stack on your CentOS 7 server so you can run a website from any Dedicated Server or Virtual Private Server. Although we’re focusing on installing LAMP on a CentOS 7 server, the steps that we’ll cover are very similar across multiple Linux distributions.

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How to Install and Configure Puppet on CentOS, Fedora, Ubuntu or Opensuse

Reading Time: 4 minutes

What is Puppet?

lookPuppet is an intuitive, task-controlling software which provides a straightforward method to manage Linux and Windows server functions from a central master server. It can perform administrative work across a wide array of systems that are primarily defined by a “manifest” file, for the group or type of server(s) being controlled.

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How to Install MySQL on Windows

Reading Time: 2 minutesIf you’re using a Windows-based server to host your content, you may using Microsoft’s database server product, MSSQL. However, licensing restrictions can make using MSSQL difficult, especially for small businesses. Microsoft offers a free version of MSSQL called MSSQL Express that will be suitable for many users, but this version does have limitations on database size and memory usage. If you need a more robust database solution but want to try something with a lower cost (like a free, open-source database server), you could try MySQL database server.

MySQL is a standard part of the typical Linux server build (or LAMP stack) but is also available for use on Windows operating systems. Depending on your needs, you could fully develop your database in MySQL. Many popular Content Management Systems (CMS) also use MySQL by default, so using MySQL to manage those applications may be beneficial. MySQL and MSSQL can be run on the same server at the same time, so you’re free to use both or to experiment as needed.

Installing MySQL on your Windows server is as simple as downloading an MSI Installer package and clicking through a few options.

  1. Download the MySQL Installer from dev.mysql.com. The two download options are a web-community version and a full version. The web-community version will only download the server, by default, but you can select other applications (like Workbench) as desired. The full installer will download the server and all the recommended additional applications. (You’ll also be asked to create a user account, but you skip this part by scrolling down to the bottom and clicking “No thanks, just start my download”.)

    mysql_installer_download

  2. Run the installer that you downloaded from its location on your server, generally by double-clicking.
     
    Note
    You can use this same MSI Installer to upgrade currently installed versions of MySQL as well! As is typical, the first step is accepting the license agreement, then click Next.

    license agreement

  3. Determine which setup type you would like to use for the installation:
    1. Developer Default: this is the full installation of MySQL Server and the other tools needed for development. If you are building your database from the ground up or will be managing the data directly in the database, you’ll want to use this setup type.
    2. Server Only: if you only need MySQL Server installed for use with a CMS or other application and will not be managing the database directly, you can install just the server (you can always install additional tools later).
    3. Custom: this setup type will allow you to customize every part of the installation from the server version to whichever additional tools you select.

      setup type

  4. Install the server instance and whichever additional products you selected. Then begin the configuration process by selecting the availability level (most users will use the default, standalone version).
  5. Complete the configuration process by following the on-screen instructions. You’ll want to make sure to install MySQL as a Service so that Windows can automatically start the service after a reboot or can restart the service if it fails. For additional, step-by-step instructions, see MySQL Server Configuration with MySQL Installer.

Have other thoughts or questions? Our Sales and Support teams are available 24 hours by phone or e-mail to assist. Reach out to us by opening a support ticket at support@liquidweb.com, giving us a call at 1-800-580-4985 or, open a chat with us and we’ll be happy to answer any questions you may have!

SSL Checker Tool

Reading Time: 4 minutesThe security of your website is vital to the success of your Internet business. One way you can protect your data (and your customers) is through the use of encrypted communication protocols. Secure Socket Layer (or SSL) was the original method of providing for basic encryption between servers and clients. The industry mostly uses Transport Layer Security (or TLS) protocols now, but the process is basically the same, and most users refer to this kind of encryption by the old name: SSL.  As part of our Web Hosting Toolkit, Liquid Web provides and SSL Tool to help you verify that your SSL is installed correctly and up-to-date.  Below is an insight on how to use this tool and as well as some core concepts and certificates types to know when dealing with SSL.

 

SSL Certificate Checker

You’ll want to confirm that everything is functioning correctly on the server once you’ve successfully ordered and installed your SSL. At this time, you’ll want to check on your domain SSL’s to confirm expiration dates, covered subdomains, or other information. While you can use various third-party SSL checkers on the Internet, Liquid Web makes gathering this information about your domain simple. Just go to the Liquid Web Internet Webhosting Toolkit page and click on SSL Tool.

 lw-sslchecker

How Do I Check If My SSL Certificate is Valid?

Enter your domain name in the box provided and click on Submit. You can enter either your primary domain name (like mydomain.com) or any of the subdomains you may have created SSL certificates for (like blog.mydomain.com). If an SSL certificate is installed on the server for the domain, the page will display the status of the certificate and additional information.

lw sslchecker details

In this example, you can see that the certificate is valid and trusted by browsers and that the tested domain matches the certificate.

lw sslchecker valid test

You can also see which Certificate Authority issued the certificate and the dates for which the certificate is valid.

lw sslchecker certificate authority

Finally, you can see which signing algorithm was used to generate the certificate (indicating how complex and secure the certificate is) and which domains and subdomains are covered by the certificate.

lw sslchecker san details

How SSLs Work

SSL connections work through a series of tools that exist on your server and on a client’s web browser. At the simplest level, the server and a client computer exchange information and agree on a secret “handshake” that allows each computer to trust the other computer. This handshake is established through the use of private and public SSL certificate keys. The private key resides on the server, and the public key is available to a client computer. All information passed between the computers is encoded and can only be decoded if the keys match. These keys are generated by a Certificate Authority (like GlobalSign) and can vary in complexity and expiration date. These matched keys exist to prevent what are known as “man in the middle” attacks when a third-party intercepts the Internet traffic for the purpose of stealing valuable data (like passwords or credit card information). Because the third-party doesn’t possess the matching keys, they will be unable to read any of the intercepted information.

By using a trusted certificate, your website users can enter their information with full confidence that their data is safe. Certificate Authorities only grant SSL certificates to operators who can prove that they are the legitimate owner of a domain and that the domain is hosted on the server for which the certificate is being issued. This proof is usually obtained by modifying the DNS records for a domain during the verification process of the certificate ordering transaction. To learn more about how to order an SSL through your Liquid Web account, see How To Order or Renew an SSL Certificate in Manage.

 

Types of SSL Certificates

While SSL certificates all provide the same essential functions, there are several different types of certificates to choose from. You’ll want to establish which certificate meets your needs before you decide to order one for your domain. The types we’ll discuss here are Self-Signed Certificates, Standard Domain Certificates, Wildcard Certificates, Extended Validation Certificates.

Self-Signed Certificates

Most servers have the capability of generating a Self-Signed SSL certificate. These certificates provide the same kinds of encrypted communication that certificate provided by Certificate Authorities provide. However, because they are self-signed, there is no proof that the server is the “real” server associated with a website. Many control panels use self-signed certificates because the owner of the server knows the IP address of the server and can trust that they are connecting to the correct site when using that IP address. The advantage of self-signed certificates is that they are easy to generate and are free to use for as long as you want to use them.

Standard Domain Certificates

If you only need to secure a single domain or subdomain, a standard domain SSL certificate is appropriate. Standard certificates are generally the least expensive option from Certificate Authorities and are designed to cover one domain or subdomain (generally both domain.com and www.domain.com are covered by a standard certificate).

Wildcard Certificates

If you have multiple subdomains, you may be able to save time and money by getting a wildcard SSL certificate. Wildcard certificates cover a domain and all of its subdomains. For instance, if you have a domain website that also has a mail subdomain, a blog, a news site, and a staging site that you want to be protected by SSL communication, a single wildcard would protect all of the sites.

Note
A wildcard certificate will only protect one level of subdomains. So, blog.mydomain.com is covered, but new.blog.mydomain.com would not be covered.

Extended Validation Certificates

SSL certificates are generally issued to companies that can prove they have the right to use a domain name on the Internet (normally because they can modify the DNS records for that domain). While that level of verification is sufficient for most companies, you may need to have additional evidence that your company is a reliable entity for business purposes. Organizational SSL certificates require additional vetting by a Certificate Authority, including checks about the physical location of your company and your right to conduct business. Organizational SSL details can be visible on your website if you install a Secure Site Seal. Additional vetting is available for companies that choose Extended Validation SSL certificates. Extended Validation processes are often used by banks and financial institutions to provide extra reassurance to their customers that their website is legitimate. EV SSLs will turn the address bar of the client’s browser green and display the company’s name on the right side of the address bar.

If you need help determining which type of SSL is right for your business, chat with our Solutions team for additional information.

Now that you’ve checked the details of your SSL certificate and confirmed that all of the information is correct, you’ll be sure that the communications between your server and your customer’s computers are secure as that information travels over the Internet. For more information about improving the overall security of your server, see Best Practices: Protecting Your Website from Compromise.

 

How to Install Nextcloud 15 on Ubuntu 18.04

Reading Time: 2 minutesSimilar to Dropbox and Google Drive, Nextcloud is self-hosting software that allows you to share files, contacts, and calendars. But, unlike Dropbox and Google Drive, your files will be private and stored on your server instead of a third party server. Nextcloud is HIPAA and GDPR compliant, so your files will be encrypted along with the ability to audit. For this tutorial, we’ll be installing our Nextcloud instance on our Ubuntu 18.04 LTS server. Continue reading “How to Install Nextcloud 15 on Ubuntu 18.04”