Change a Password for PostgreSQL on Linux via Command Line

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PostgreSQL supports many client authentication methods, but in this case we’re only going to concern ourselves with two: password and md5.

Note: The default authentication method for PostgreSQL is ident. If you’d like to change the PostgreSQL authentication method from ident to md5, then visit the linked tutorial!

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Change PostgreSQL Authentication Method from Ident to MD5

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PostgreSQL supports multiple client authentication methods including: trust, reject, md5, password, gss, sspi, krb5, ident, peer, ldap, radius, cert, and pam. Here we’re only going to concern ourselves with two: ident and md5.

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What is the Default Password for PostgreSQL?

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When connecting to PostgreSQL on Linux for the first time many admins have questions, especially if those admins are from the MySQL world. By default, when PostgreSQL is installed, a postgres user is also added.

If you run the command:

cat /etc/passwd

… you’ll see the postgres user.

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How to Enable Two-factor Authentication (2FA)

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  • These instructions are intended specifically for enabling two-factor authentication for Manage users.

What is Two-factor Authentication (2FA)?

Two-factor authentication (also known as 2FA) means that instead of just a password (one factor), you will need two factors (password, plus a rotating authentication token) to login to your Manage account. Only the correct combination of the first and second factors will allow you to log in. Two-factor authentication is more secure than one-factor authentication.

How to Enable Two-factor Authentication (2FA)
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