The Best Settings for Configuring FastCGI (mod_fcgid)

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In our last tutorial, we showed you how to install Apache’s mod_fcgid and provided Linux scripts to assist in transitioning from mod_php. In this next section, we’ll be discussing how to configure a baseline setting for PHP optimization. Continue reading “The Best Settings for Configuring FastCGI (mod_fcgid)”

Load Balancing Techniques and Optimizations

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The hosting world’s bread & butter solution for providing high availability and redundancy is load balancing. There are many different use cases for a Load Balancer (LB). It is important to know how to effectively manage your LB configuration so that it performs optimally in your environment.  The proceeding article will review some of the common practices that, when adhered to, provide a smooth and seamless high availability website/application through the use of load balancing. Continue reading “Load Balancing Techniques and Optimizations”

MySQL Performance: InnoDB Buffers & Directives

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As discussed earlier in our MySQL Performance series, the InnoDB storage engine is designed to be a high-performance database for very large datasets. The row-locking technique it uses allows for many read and write requests to occur on a single table concurrently. This is a vast improvement in speed over traditional Continue reading “MySQL Performance: InnoDB Buffers & Directives”

MySQL Performance: System Configuration File & Routine Maintenance

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The majority of work needed when adjusting the MySQL server is editing the applicable directives within a MySQL configuration file. There are multiple, optional configuration files that MySQL looks for when starting up. They are read in the following order: Continue reading “MySQL Performance: System Configuration File & Routine Maintenance”

Apache Performance Tuning: Configuring MPM Directives

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Our previous article in this series focused on defining and fitting MPM to match your environment.  Building off of our last tutorial we will be discussing specific details on how to adjust the previously mentioned Apache configuration directives on the various types of Liquid Web servers.  

Continue reading “Apache Performance Tuning: Configuring MPM Directives”

Apache Performance Tuning: MPM Modules

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The keystone for understanding Apache server performance is by far the MultiProcessing Modules (MPMs). These modules determine the basis for how Apache addresses multiprocessing. Multiprocessing means running multiple operations simultaneously in a system with multiple central processing units (CPU Cores).

There are many MPMs to choose; however, this article focuses on the most commonly used modules found in Liquid Web Linux based servers. These modules are:

The self-regulating MPM Prefork derives its namesake from how it forks or copies itself into new identical processes preemptively to wait for incoming requests. A non-threaded process-based approach at multiprocessing, MPM Prefork runs Apache in a single master parent server process. This parent is responsible for managing any additional child servers that make up its serverpool. While using MPM Prefork, each child server handles only a single request. This focus provides complete isolation from other requests dealt with on the server. MPM Prefork is typically used for compatibility when non-threaded libraries/software, like mod_php (DSO), are required. From an optimization standpoint, MPM Prefork can be sorely lacking when compared to multi-threaded solutions, requiring vastly more resources to reach similar traffic levels as a threaded MPM. It is resource intensive due to its need to spawn full copies of Apache for every request.

MPM Prefork

Rule-of-Thumb:
Avoid using MPM Prefork whenever possible. It’s inability to scale well with increased traffic will quickly outpace the available hardware on most system configurations.

 

A hybrid pre-forking, multithreaded, multiprocessing web server. In the same fashion as MPM Prefork, MPM Worker uses the same approach with a single master parent process governing all children within its serverpool. However, unlike MPM Prefork, these children are multi-threaded processes that can handle dozens of threads (requests) simultaneously. MPM Worker has set the foundation for multithreaded multiprocessing in Apache servers which became stable in Apache 2.2. The threaded configuration allows Apache to service hundreds of requests with ease while retaining only a dozen or so child processes in memory. The MPM Worker make for both a high capacity and low resource solution for web service.

MPM Worker

Note
The KeepAliveTimeOut directive currently defines the amount of time Apache will wait for requests. When utilizing KeepAlive with MPM Worker use the smallest KeepAliveTimeout as possible (1 second preferably).

Based off the MPM Worker source code, MPM Event shares configuration directives with MPM Worker. It works nearly identical to MPM Worker except when it comes to handling KeepAlive requests. MPM Event uses a dedicated Listener thread in each child process. This Listening thread is responsible for directing incoming requests to an available worker thread. The Listening thread solves the issue encountered by MPM Worker which locks entire threads into waiting for the KeepAliveTimeout. The Listener approach of MPM Event ensures worker threads are not “stuck” waiting for KeepAliveTimeout to expire. This method keeps the maximum amount of worker threads handling as many requests as possible.


MPM EventMP

Tip:
MPM Event is stable in Apache 2.4, older versions can use MPM Worker as an alternative.

There is an assortment of additional MPMs available. These are typically part of Apache’s integration into Operating Systems other than Unix based systems. These have specific MPMs which are requirements or utilizing Apache on their respective system types. These types of MPMs are beyond the purview of this article. You can find more information on specific MPM in the MPM Defaults section of the official Apache Documentation.

MPM EventMP

Tip:
We recommend staying away from experimental and unstable MPMs. The unreliable nature of these types of software renders them unsupportable.

 

When considering optimization, it is essential to understand there is no such thing as a one-size-fits-all Apache configuration. Correctly choosing an MPM requires analysis of many moving variables like traffic, site code, server type, PHP Handler and available hardware. Every server is unique making the best MPM an entirely subjective choice.

If your application code does not support multi-threading, then your choice will inevitably be MPM Prefork purely on a compatibility basis. MPM Prefork includes software modules like mod_php (DSO). MPM Worker without KeepAlive performs very well if your application is a high-performance load balanced API system. The scalability and flexibility of MPM Event is a solid choice for hosting multiple small to medium sites in a shared hosting configuration.

Most simple servers setups operate well under the self-governing default configuration of MPM Event, making it an ideal starting point for optimization tuning. Once chosen, an MPM can then move onto Configuration Directives to review which settings pertain to server performance and optimization. Or check out our previous article in this series, Apache Performance Tuning: Swap Memory.

Install Nginx on Ubuntu 16.04

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Nginx is an open source Linux web server that accelerates content while utilizing low resources. Known for its performance and stability Nginx has many other uses such as load balancing, reverse proxy, mail proxy, and HTTP cache. With all these qualities it makes a definite competitor for Apache. To install Nginx follow our straightforward tutorial. Continue reading “Install Nginx on Ubuntu 16.04”

WordPress Tutorial 4: Recommended WordPress Plugins

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This is part 4 in an ongoing series on WordPress. Please see Part 1: WordPress Tutorial 1: Installation Setup and Part 2: WordPress Tutorial 2: Terminology and Part 3: WordPress Tutorial 3: How to Install a New Plugin, Theme, or Widget.

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Now that you have WordPress installed, understand the interface, and know how to install new parts, let’s take a look at our recommended plugins.
Continue reading “WordPress Tutorial 4: Recommended WordPress Plugins”

How and Why: Enabling Apache’s Piped Logging

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Apache by default logs data directly to log files. While this isn’t a bad thing, it is not your only option. Both Apache 1.x and Apache 2.x bring with them the option of enabling something called “Piped Logging”, though cPanel will only allow you to enable it for version 2.x.

Continue reading “How and Why: Enabling Apache’s Piped Logging”