Installing cPanel/WHM On CentOS 6 & 7

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What is cPanel? 

cPanel is a server control panel which allows users the ability to access and automate server tasks and, provides the tools needed to manage the overall server, their applications, and websites. CPanel_logoSome features include the capability to modify php versions, creating individual cPanel accounts, adding FTP users, installing SSL’s, configuring security settings, and installing packages to name a few. cPanel and WHM have a vast range of customizations and configurations that can be completed to further personalize your platform specifically for your needs.  It also includes 24/7 support from cPanel as well.

When purchasing a server from Liquid Web, we offer several images your server can be built from.  We offer these images on most of our hosting products, including, dedicated servers, cloud dedicated servers, and our VPS offerings.  Another bonus is that cPanel is supported out of the box on our fully managed servers. Our staff is well versed in providing assistance as well.  Our automated install process will install and setup cPanel on your server. If you happen to have a cPanel license or are utilizing cPanel’s free trial, then please continue reading as we will be discussing how to install and setup cPanel on a CentOS 6 or 7 Linux box.

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Why Choose CentOS 6 or 7

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Introduction

The servers that run our applications, our businesses, all depend on the stability and underlying features offered by the operating system (or OS) installed. As administrators, we have to plan ahead and think to the future of how our users will use the machines we oversee while simultaneously ensuring that those machines remain stable and online. There are numerous operating systems to choose from; however one of the most popular, most stable, and highly supported OSes is CentOS. A combination of excellent features, rock-solid performance stability, and the backing of enterprise-focused institutions such as Red Hat and Fedora have led to CentOS becoming a mainstay OS that administrators can count on.

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Apache Performance Tuning: Configuring MPM Directives

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Our previous article in this series focused on defining and fitting MPM to match your environment.  Building off of our last tutorial we will be discussing specific details on how to adjust the previously mentioned Apache configuration directives on the various types of Liquid Web servers

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How to enable EPEL repository?

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The EPEL repository is an additional package repository that provides easy access to install packages for commonly used software. This repo was created because Fedora contributors wanted to use Fedora packages they maintain on RHEL and other compatible distributions.

To put it simply the goal of this repo was to provide greater ease of access to software on Enterprise Linux compatible distributions.

What’s an ‘EPEL repository’?

The EPEL repository is managed by the EPEL group, which is a Special Interest Group within the Fedora Project. The ‘EPEL’ part is an abbreviation that stands for Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux. The EPEL group creates, maintains and manages a high quality set of additional packages. These packages may be software not included in the core repository, or sometimes updates which haven’t been provided yet.
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How to Remove (Delete) a User on CentOS 6

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Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended specifically for removing a user on CentOS 6.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed CentOS 6 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

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How to Install mlocate (locate and updatedb Commands) on CentOS 6

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One of the best tools for quickly finding files by filename is the locate command. The locate command reads one or more databases prepared by updatedb and writes file names matching at least one of the patterns to standard output, one per line.

Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended specifically for installing mlocate on CentOS 6.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Self Managed CentOS 6 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

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How to Update the glibc (GNU libc) in CentOS / Red Hat

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Updating glibc on Red Hat Linux or CentOS Linux is a very simple process. Most commonly you will use the following command in the case of a security vulnerability, or perhaps just to verify that you’re running the most up-to-date library:

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How to Check the glibc (GNU libc) Version on CentOS 6 and CentOS 7

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Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended specifically for checking the installed version of glibc.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed CentOS 6 and CentOS 7 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

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