Installing cPanel/WHM On CentOS 6 & 7

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What is cPanel? 

cPanel is a server control panel which allows users the ability to access and automate server tasks and, provides the tools needed to manage the overall server, their applications, and websites.  CPanel_logoSome features include the capability to modify php versions, creating individual cPanel accounts, adding FTP users, installing SSL’s, configuring security settings, and installing packages to name a few. cPanel and WHM have a vast range of customizations and configurations that can be completed to further personalize your platform specifically for your needs.  It also includes 24/7 support from cPanel as well.

When purchasing a server from Liquid Web, we offer several images your server can be built from.  We offer these images on most of our hosting products, including, dedicated servers, cloud dedicated servers, and our VPS offerings.  Another bonus is that cPanel is supported out of the box on our fully managed servers. Our staff is well versed in providing assistance as well.  Our automated install process will install and setup cPanel on your server. If you happen to have a cPanel license or are utilizing cPanel’s free trial, then please continue reading as we will be discussing how to install and setup cPanel on a CentOS 6 or 7 Linux box.  

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How to Install Logwatch on Fedora 22

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Logwatch is a Perl-based log management tool for analyzing, summarizing, and reporting on a server’s log files. It is most often used to send a short digest of a server’s log activity to a system administrator.

What are log files? Logs are application-generated files useful for tracking down and understanding what has happened in the past.

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended specifically for installing the Logwatch on Fedora 22.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Self Managed Fedora 22 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

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How to Install Logwatch on Fedora 21

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Logwatch is a Perl-based log management tool for analyzing, summarizing, and reporting on a server’s log files. It is most often used to send a short digest of server’s log activity to a system administrator.

What are log files? Logs are application-generated files useful for tracking down and understanding what has happened in the past.

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended specifically for installing the Logwatch on Fedora 21.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Self Managed Fedora 21 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

Continue reading “How to Install Logwatch on Fedora 21”

How to Install Logwatch on Fedora 20

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Logwatch is a Perl-based log management tool for analyzing, summarizing, and reporting on a server’s log files. It is most often used to send a short digest of server’s log activity to a system administrator.

What are log files? Logs are application-generated files useful for tracking down and understanding what has happened in the past.

Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended specifically for installing the Logwatch on Fedora 20.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Self Managed Fedora 20 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

Continue reading “How to Install Logwatch on Fedora 20”

How to Install Logwatch on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

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Logwatch is a Perl-based log management tool for analyzing, summarizing, and reporting on a server’s log files. It is most often used to send a short digest of server’s log activity to a system administrator.

What are log files? Logs are application-generated files useful for tracking down and understanding what has happened in the past.

Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended specifically for installing the Logwatch on Ubuntu 12.04 LTS.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed Ubuntu 12.04 LTS server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

Continue reading “How to Install Logwatch on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS”

How to Install Logwatch on Ubuntu 12.04 LTS

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Logwatch is a Perl-based log management tool for analyzing, summarizing, and reporting on a server’s log files. It is most often used to send a short digest of server’s log activity to a system administrator.

What are log files? Logs are application-generated files useful for tracking down and understanding what has happened in the past.

Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended specifically for installing the Logwatch on Ubuntu 12.04 LTS.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed Ubuntu 12.04 LTS server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

Continue reading “How to Install Logwatch on Ubuntu 12.04 LTS”

How to Install Logwatch on CentOS 7

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Logwatch is a Perl-based log management tool for analyzing, summarizing, and reporting on a server’s log files. It is most often used to send a short digest of server’s log activity to a system administrator.

What are log files? Logs are application-generated files useful for tracking down and understanding what has happened in the past.

Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended specifically for installing the Logwatch on CentOS 7.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed CentOS 7 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

Continue reading “How to Install Logwatch on CentOS 7”

How to Install Logwatch on CentOS 6

Reading Time: 1 minute

Logwatch is a Perl-based log management tool for analyzing, summarizing, and reporting on a server’s log files. It is most often used to send a short digest of server’s log activity to a system administrator.

What are log files? Logs are application-generated files useful for tracking down and understanding what has happened in the past.

Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended specifically for installing the Logwatch on CentOS 6.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed CentOS 6.5 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

Continue reading “How to Install Logwatch on CentOS 6”