How to Convert .htaccess Rules to NGINX Directives

Reading Time: 6 minutes

NGINX is a webserver that is becoming an increasingly popular option for webhosting, as sixteen percent of all sites on the internet are utilizing NGINX. This percentage is constantly increasing as clients are in need of a web server that can serve content faster. It can also be used for proxies, reverse proxies, load balancing, and more depending on what modules you load onto NGINX. One of the significant differences between Apache (a popular webserver) and NGINX is the way each system handles access rules. If you are familiar with using .htaccess rules in Apache, then the method that NGINX uses of including directives in the server’s vhost block will be substantial change.

We will be showing how to convert .htaccess rewrite rules to NGINX rewrite directives. The NGINX rewrite directives will also need to be placed within the server block. Many server configurations include this server block information in the vhosts file, while some use a separate NGINX configuration file (for more information about the NGINX configuration file, see Redirecting URLs Using NGINX). To complete this task, you will need to understand some of the basic NGINX directives I will be discussing in the next session.

Introduction to NGINX Rewrite and Return Directives

The most commonly used directives with NGINX are the return and rewrite directives. When using an NGINX directive, a client visiting a page can be directed to a different directory or a different landing page. Requests can also be redirected to an application depending on the directives you specify. For example, clients visiting the page from a smartphone can be forwarded to a script that is coded specifically for phone browsers. Another example would be to forward a client based on IP or geographical location, making your site region specific and tailored to the visitor based on location.

NGINX Return Directive

The return directive is a bit less complicated than the rewrite directive. Best practice is to use this directive over the rewrite directive whenever possible. You will typically include the return in a server context that specifies the domains to be rewritten. I have included a common example below. Clients visiting the site will be redirected to the domain specified after the 301 status code. Using this directive will forward the client that visits www.liquidwebtest.com to www.liquidweb.com.

server {
listen 80;
server_name www.liquidwebtest.com;
return 301 $scheme://www.liquidweb.com$request_uri;
}

  • Server { } is defining the block
  • Listen “what port to listen to”
  • Server_name “defining the incoming requested URL”
  • Return “what the server returns from this request”

NGINX Rewrite Directive

The rewrite directive is somewhat different that the rewrite rules in .htaccess. It needs to be placed in a specific location or server block in order to rewrite the URL. The rewrite directive is usually used to perform smaller tedious tasks. For example, it is used in some cases to capture elements in the original URL or change elements in the path. The NGINX rewrite directive can get very complicated but once you understand the basic syntax it can be a lot less intimidating. I have included the basic syntax for a NGINX rewrite directive below.

rewrite regex URL [flag];
It is important to know a rewrite directive will almost always return a HTTP 301 or 302 status code. If you need your web server to return a different status code, the return directive is needed after the rewrite. I have included an example below from NGINX’s rewrite module documentation.

server{
...
rewrite ^(/download/.*)/media/(.*)\..*$ $1/mp3/$2.mp3 last;
rewrite ^(/download/.*)/audio/(.*)\..*$ $1/mp3/$2.ra last;
return 403;
...
}

In this example the URLs that start with /download followed by /media or /audio are matched. Afterwards directories /media and /audio elements that contain /mp3 will have the extension .mp3 or .ra file extension added to the URL. This return directive will return a 403 to the client if the URL does not match the rewrite rule.

Converting .htaccess rules to NGINX directives

Hopefully by this point we have a basic understanding of the two most commonly used NGINX directives. However, learning these rules will take some time as the can be very complex. Learning regular expression is very helpful in this process. We’ll work through examples of commonly used htaccess rules that we will be converting to NGINX directives.

Example: Redirecting from example.com to www.example.com

Adding the www to a URL when a client requests content from your server can help certain sites (like those hosted on WordPress) to function more efficiently. A common .htaccess rule to accomplish this rewrite is:

RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} example.com
RewriteRule (.*)https://www.example.com$1

As I mentioned earlier it is best practice to use the return directive whenever possible. Below we will be creating a server block within the nginx.conf to accomplish the same task as the .htaccess rewrite rule above.

server {
listen 80;
server_name example.com;
return 301 http://www.example.com
$request_uri;
}
server {
listen 80'
server_name www.example.com;
#...
}

In this example there will be two server blocks defined with brackets” {}”. We are telling NGINX to listen on port 80 for requests to example.com. Then to return a 301 ”redirection” to www.example.com. We usually split these rules in two server blocks to make these directives as efficient as possible. The 2nd is not always needed but will serve content from the working directory if www.example.com is requested. If no exact match is found, NGINX then checks to see if there is a server_name with a starting wildcard that fits. The longest match beginning with a wildcard will be selected to fulfill the request.

You can test your syntax by running the following command:

nginx -t

This allows you to test the syntax for errors before loading the changes in the configuration file and possibly causing issues on your live site. Once you have edited the NGINX configuration file be sure to restart NGINX using a daemon or simply running the command below.

nginx -s reload

Example: WordPress Permalinks

In this example, I have included one of the most common set of .htaccess rules used today. The rules I have included below allow wordpress to utilize permalinks. This is installed by default with wordpress on an Apache server. A permalink is a URL that is intended to remain unchanged. For example, domainexample.com/blogexample.php can be loaded as domainexample.com/blog within your browsers address bar.

<IfModule mod_rewrite.c>
RewriteEngine On
RewriteBase /
RewriteRule ^index.php$ - [L] RewriteCond ${REQUEST_FILENAME} ~ - f
RewriteCond ${REQUEST_FILENAME} ~ - d
RewriteRule . /index.php [L] <IfModule>

Belowis the NGINX equivalent. No return or rewrite directive is needed here as we are only allowing the content management system to hide the paths using permalinks. For more information on this task please see NGINX’s documentation on permalinks.

location / {
try_files $uri $uri/ /index.php?$args;
}

You can test your syntax by running the following command:

nginx -t

This allows you to test the syntax for errors before loading the changes in the configuration file and possibly causing issues on your live site. Once you have edited the NGINX configuration file be sure to restart NGINX using a daemon or simply running the command below.

nginx -s reload

Example: Forcing http to https

Another popular use for the htaccess file is to force the browser to load the site using https over http. This allows the browser to verify the site is not a security risk by confirming the site exists on the server it claims to be on (see What Is an SSL Certificate?). It can also be used to verify a business location, business ID number, and location. This helps prevent visiting malicious sites that may cause harm to your personal computer or private information.

The following .htaccess rule will force https, so that requests using port 80 for example.com will be redirected to https://www.example.com.

RewriteEngine On
RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^example\.com [NC] RewriteCond %{SERVER_PORT} 80
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ https://www.example.com/$1 [R,L]

To accomplish this with NGINX, we will use the NGINX return directive.

server {
listen 80;
server_name example.com;
return 301 https://www.example.com$request_uri;
}

You can test your syntax by running the following command:

nginx -t

This allows you to test the syntax for errors before loading the changes in the configuration file and possibly causing issues on your live site. Once you have edited the NGINX configuration file be sure to restart NGINX using a daemon or simply running the command below.

nginx -s reload

Conclusion
We could go on and on with examples but hopefully at this point we now have a basic understanding on converting htaccess for Apache to NGINX directives. If you require further information on accomplishing these tasks you can always reach out to our support for assistance. However, we do not fully support NGINX and it is considered Beyond Scope support. This means we will assist you as much as possible but we may not be able to resolve your issue and may instead refer you to a developer for additional assistance. If you want to use NGINX web server to host your content, we have multiple options including our VPS lineup to meet your business requirements. NGINX is currently being developed for use on cPanel servers as well, although it is not currently supported or recommended in production situations. See cPanel’s blog for more information.

How to Change Your Hostname in Ubuntu 16.04

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Image result for ubuntu logo

Times are changing, and possibly your hostname is too if you are reading this article.  You may have come across a scenario within your business that requires you to change your hostname.  You might ask yourself why you would need to change your hostname? The most common scenarios would be due to a domain name change, your business has changed its course, or because you have thought of something better.

Sometimes you might forget to renew the domain names before they expire. Unfortunately, this can be a time where a domain brokers purchases you domain name.  These are agencies who take popular sites and purchase with the intent of holding the domain until their inflated price is met.  As unfortunate as this may be, sometimes it is best to purchase a new domain name for cost efficiency.

Note
When purchasing domains from Liquid Web you can always select the option to Auto Renew within our portal Domains >> My Domains

 

Benefits to using a Fully Qualified Domain Name for your Hostname

It is good practice to use your FQDN Fully Qualified Domain Name as your hostname. Following this practice creates more options for securing your hostname with an SSL.  This will allow services like email to function using a secured connection. Using a hostname with a registered domain will allow you to add a corresponding DNS entry.  This will prevent unpredictable behavior by some services that use the hostname. This would allow you to set up a reverse lookup DNS entry. It can be very important especially with services like email verfication.  For example, when an email is sent the receiving server runs a reverse lookup on the sender’s hostname. The reverse lookup allows receivers server to ensure the hostname resolves to the matching IP address. This is just one preventive measure servers now use to reduce email spoofing incidents.

By using a unique domain name, you can reduce editing time. You may have a script that calls to the servers IP, instead of the hostname, to correctly function.  Best practice is to use the hostname because future migrations may change IP addresses/ranges.  Using the hostname can save you a lot of time in the long run, depending on your infrastructure and coding.

 

Using SSH for Windows 10, 7/8, and Mac OS X

We’ll need to connect to your server.  For this article, we will be using SSH “Secure Shell” to access the server and issues commands.  SSH is a powerful tool that will allow us to establish a secure connection with your server, diagnose, and issue remote commands.  For more information on the SSH protocol, you can visit the following links.

There are a few ways to use SSH depending on your operating system. We’ve have included some examples below followed by links with more information.

Windows 10

Using SSH client in Windows 10

Note
Note: Because the OpenSSH client was introduced in the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update, you’ll need to first update to at least that version of the operating system.

Windows 7/8

Unfortunately, for older versions of Windows, it is not exactly possible to set up an SSH natively to connect to your server.  Thankfully, applications were created to assist. We like to use MobaXterm, but Putty is a safe choice as well. Both of these applications are free to use and simple to set up. We’ve included links below with more information on these applications.

Mac OS X

Newer Mac operating systems come with an excellent utility to access SSH called Terminal. To access Terminal navigate to your Applications folder >> Utilities folder >> Terminal.

In case Terminal is inefficient for your preference, there are other options available in the App store or through a quick search on Google . Putty is also available on Mac!

 

Changing the Hostname in Ubuntu 16.04

At this point, you should be able to access your server using SSH.  Once you have accessed your server, you will want to either switch to the root user or run these commands using sudo.  The files you will be accessing are owned by root. Because of this, you will need root privileges.

To start things off, we will want to edit /etc/hostname and the /etc/hosts files.  You can do so by using a text editor of your choice. We will demonstrate how to accomplish this task using the text editor called VIM.  Some of these command line text editors can seem complicated, we will include the “sed” command to make things even easier.

Switching to root user:

# su – root  

Editing the hostname and hosts file:

# vim /etc/hostname  

# vim /etc/hosts  

Once you have opened these files, you will need to change your hostname as follows:

  1. Press the i key to insert.  This will allow you to edit.  You will notice the editor says “Insert” at the bottom of the page.
  2. Use the arrow keys to navigate the cursor to your old hostname.
  3. Backspace to delete single characters
  4. Replace with the new hostname.  Be sure the syntax is correct.
  5. When done editing hit the ESC key to exit insert mode.
  6. Then hold shift andpress the : key
  7. Finally, type wq and press enter key. This will write to the file and quit the editor
  8. Repeat for /etc/hostname                                                            

As we mentioned earlier, the command line text editors can appear to be overly complicated, especially when you’re used to programs like Word and the Window’s text editor.  Because of this, we have included the command below.

Note
Change host.example.com to your old hostname. Change host.newhostname.com to your new hostname

# sed -i 's/host.example.com/host.newhostname.com/g' /etc/hosts

# sed -i 's/host.example.com/host.newhostname.com/g' /etc/hostname

After editing these files, you’ll need to reboot the server. If you wish to reboot at a later time but still want your new hostname to take immediate effect click on this sentence to skip ahead. Otherwise, you can do so by running

# reboot

Your SSH session should be terminated.  Depending on your server it can take a few minutes to boot back up.  Once the server is back online you can check your changes by running the following command:

# hostname  

If all went well, the terminal should output your new hostname.

If you wish to reboot at a later time but still want your new hostname to take immediate effect, you can use the hostname command to temporarily set the hostname until the next reboot.  From there, the changes in /etc/hosts and /etc/hostname will take permanent effect.

# hostname host.newhostname.com

There is also an alternative available.  The hostnamectl command is default for both Desktop and Server versions. They combine setting the hostname via the hostname  command, editing  /etc/hostname and setting the static hostname. Unfortunately, editing /etc/hosts  still has to be done separately.

Example:

# hostnamectl set-hostname host.newhostname.com

 

Common Issue after Hostname Update

The “Failed to start hostname.service: Unit hostname.service is masked” error can happen when there is a syntax error within the /etc/hostname, or /etc/hosts file, or when the hostname does not match between these two files.  Be sure to check both of these files for mistakes and correct them as needed. In newer versions of Ubuntu, you will also want to use the hostnamectl command mentioned earlier.  

# hostnamectl set-hostname host.newhostname.com

Once corrected, be sure to start the hostname service to see if the issue has been corrected. You can do so by running the command that we have included below. Afterward, we would recommend rebooting your server.  This is not always necessary, but in some cases, it is required.

# systemctl restart hostname  

As always, Liquid Web customer’s enjoy 24/7 technical support with changing your hostname. Reach out to our sales team to see how you can get into our lightening fast servers today!

 

How To Set Up Multiple PHP Versions in Webmin

Reading Time: 4 minutes

What is Webmin?

Webmin is a browser-based graphical interface to help you administrate your Linux server.  Much like cPanel or Plesk, Webmin allows you to set up and manage accounts, Apache, DNS zones, users and configurations.  As these configurations can get somewhat complicated Webmin works to simplify this process. The result is fewer issues during server and domain setup.  Which results in a stable server and a pleasant administration experience. Unlike Plesk or cPanel, Webmin is completely free and open to the public. Unfortunately, here at Liquid Web, we do not offer managed support for Webmin, but we are always willing to assist as much as possible when issues arise.   You can download Webmin from their site. Also, you can find some excellent documentation on this interface.

 

Installing Webmin

Before beginning “if you have not already” you will need to install Webmin on your server.  For this article, we will mainly be working with Webmin installed on a Ubuntu server. However, it is very similar to CentOS therefore we have included instructions for both operating systems below.

  • First, you will need to access your server SSH. If you are not sure how to SSH into your server, please visit our link on the subject.  
  • Once you are logged into your server SSH, please run the following commands in order or copy and paste the entire syntax.
Debian/Ubuntu

sudo sh -c 'echo "deb http://download.webmin.com/download/repository sarge contrib" > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/webmin.list'wget -qO - http://www.webmin.com/jcameron-key.asc | sudo apt-key add -
sudo apt-get updatesudo apt-get install webmin

CentOS/RedHat/Fedora

(echo "[Webmin] name=Webmin Distribution Neutral
baseurl=http://download.webmin.com/download/yum
enabled=1
gpgcheck=1
gpgkey=http://www.webmin.com/jcameron-key.asc" >/etc/yum.repos.d/webmin.repo;
yum -y install webmin)

 

Accessing Webmin

Webmin is a web-based application.  So once Webmin is installed, you can access Webmin by using a browser of your choice.   Be sure to make sure port 10000 is open on your server as Webmin utilizes this port to function.  We have included steps below to ensure the correct port is open for iptables and firewalld.

IPTABLES

iptables-save > /tmp/tabsav
vi /tmp/tabsav
iptables-restore < /tmp/tabsav
You should be able to use the command above to alter you iptables to look something like what we have included below.
# Generated by iptables-save v1.4.7 on Thu Jan 3 00:02:49 2019
*filter
:INPUT ACCEPT [0:0] :FORWARD ACCEPT [0:0] :OUTPUT ACCEPT [3044:1198306] -A INPUT -m state --state RELATED,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p icmp -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -i lo -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p tcp -m state --state NEW -m tcp --dport 22 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -j REJECT --reject-with icmp-host-prohibited-A FORWARD -j REJECT --reject-with icmp-host-prohibited
COMMIT
# Completed on Thu Jan 3 00:02:49 2019

FirewallD

firewall-cmd --zone=public --add-port=10000/tcp --permanent
firewall-cmd --reload

Once you have made sure port 10000 is open, you should be able to access the Webmin interface by entering in your servers IP address followed by the port number “10000”

Example:   https://192.168.1.100:10000             <—— 192.168.1.100 should be replaced with your server IP.

Installing PHP Versions in Webmin

There is a lot of situations where we may need to use multiple PHP versions.  For example, you may have multiple domains or applications on your server that require an older version of PHP while at the same time you may have newer domains that are configured for newer versions of PHP.   For this article, we will be installing PHP7 and PHP5.6 on Debian.

Step 1: First, you will want to SSH into your server and run the following command.
apt-get install php7.0-cli php7.0-fpmYou can check the installation after it has completed by running php –v in your terminal.

Step 2: Now here is where things tend to get tricky.  By default, Debian only offers a single PHP version in the official repository. So, we will have to add an additional repository for Debian. While adding this repository, it is good practice to enable HTTPS for APT and register the APT key. You can accomplish this by executing the commands we have included below.

apt-get install apt-transport-https
curl https://packages.sury.org/php/apt.gpg | apt-key add -
echo 'deb https://packages.sury.org/php/ stretch main' > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/deb.sury.org.list
apt-get update

Once the repository is added, we can go ahead and add our second PHP version to the server.

apt-get install php5.6-cli php5.6-fpmWe can now check both PHP versions on the server by running these commands.

php7.0 -V

Output:


php5.6 -V

Output:

Now that we have confirmed both PHP versions are installed you can access their configuration files in the following directories.

  • /etc/php/5.6/cli/php.ini
  • /etc/php/7.0./cli/php.ini

Step 3: To make things easier, later on, we will want to add the location of the configuration files to Webmin.  This can be done from within the Webmin interface.

  1. Log into Webmin
  2. Navigate to Others >> PHP Configuration
  3. Add the PHP configuration file location
  4. Click Save

You can use this tool to add and edit directives for different PHP versions. For example, you’ll be able to edit PHP’s memory limit, timeout length, extensions and more.  This simply helps consolidate configurations within one interface. From here we can just use a .htaccess file to specify what version of PHP a site should use.

Step 4: If you do not have this file already within your document root you can add this file by navigating to /var/www/exampledomain/  and running the following command to indicate which PHP version you are going to use.

echo "AddHandler application/x-httpd-php56 .php" >  .htaccess  | chown exampleuser. .htaccess

echo "AddHandler application/x-httpd-php70.php" >  .htaccess  | chown exampleuser. .htaccess

Step 5: Once you have completed this, you can test to see if your site is running on the desired PHP version.  You can accomplish this by creating a PHP information page. by making a file in your document root, usually in the path of /var/www/html/

You will want to insert the code below and save the file.

<? phpinfo(); ?>   After you have created this file, you can view the page by visiting your domain followed by the name of the file you created.  For example, www.example.com/phpinfo.php.

Congratulations you can now use Webmin to accomplish your daily admin tasks!  Take a look at our Cloud VPS servers for 24/7 support and lightening speed servers!

Install Multiple PHP Versions Using EasyApache 4

Reading Time: 8 minutes

EasyApache 4 installs, configures, updates, and validates your Apache, PHP and other services on your server. EasyApache 4 also supports multiple versions of PHP.  This allows you to assign different versions of PHP to each of your domains. There are great tools that have been implemented with EasyApache 4 that makes managing PHP versions simple. Two of these are the MultiPHP Manager and MultiPHP INI Editor. These can be found within the Web Host Manager, or “WHM” for short.  With the addition of these tools in cPanel/WHM, users can now complete most of these tasks from the Graphical User Interface. However, it is worth mentioning, attempting these tasks from the command line is recommended as we have seen better performance when compiling Apache builds.  

Note:
If you are still using EasyApache 3, please contact our support for assistance upgrading your server to EasyApache 4. EasyApache 3 is no longer being supported as of December 31st, 2018. This means there will be no further updates for this service. This can create security risks and should be addressed. Also, cPanel will not allow you to update to version 78 or newer using EasyApache 3. Before considering upgrading, please be sure you meet the following requirements.

EasyApache 4 requirements

  • Utilize Apache 2.4 or newer, updating Apache from 2.2 to 2.4 can be done from WHM using EasyApache 3, but it is recommended to run from the command line.  You can read more about this here.
  • It is recommended for the system to use suPHP as the default PHP handler.  More information on handlers can be found here.
  • CentOS 6, CloudLinux 6, Red Hat Linux 6 or higher

          

Note:
If you are still running CentOS 5 or older “due to the security risks” we would highly recommend migrating to a newer operating system as soon as possible. More than likely your current server’s hardware is also obsolete. Due to the complexities of our packages, we would recommend migrating to a new server. If you need any assistance choosing a new server, please reach out to us. Our team will gladly assist you in selecting the perfect package that will provide you with the best performance possible.

  • PHP versions 5.4 or higher. If your site is using PHP 5.3 or older, you will need to update and confirm your site is compatible with PHP Versions 5.4 or higher.  
  • MySQL/MariaDB are using updated hashes. The older versions of MySQL use an incompatible hashing algorithm.  Mysql 5.6 and later use an updated secured hash.  Since EasyApache 4 uses mysqlnd “the MySQL Native Driver” this will need to be addressed before upgrading since mysqlnd does not support older hash.  

Once you have met these requirements, your server is ready to upgrade EasyApache 3 to EasyApache 4.  When upgrading EasyApache we would recommend beginning this task at a time your server is not expecting much traffic as the process can take 20 minutes to a few hours.  This depends on your specific server’s performance and overhead. If you require any assistance with meeting the requirements needed to upgrade or would like to schedule an upgrade.  Please call, start a chat or submit a ticket with our support team.

Other than the requirements there are a few other obstacles you may need to check.

  1. Be sure the suPHP_ConfigPath directive is not being used in any .htaccess file as unexpected behavior may occur. You can correct this by removing or commenting this directive out within the .htaccess file. (The .htaccess can be found in /home/$cpaneluser/public_html  or /home/$cpaneluser/)
  1. Find any php.ini or .user.ini that will try to reference the old environment variable,  extension_dir, either the line will need to be removed or corrected. (The .php.ini/.user.ini can be found in /home/$cpaneluser/public_html  or /home/$cpaneluser/)

Upgrading EasyApache 3 to EasyApache 4 Script

Access your server via SSH and insert the following command:  

/scripts/migrate_ea3_to_ea4 –run 

To revert back to EasyApache 3

/scripts/migrate_ea3_to_ea4 –revert –run

Once EasyApache 4 is installed, please be sure to test your sites for any errors and confirm that WHM/cPanel is up to date.

 

Configuring Apache and PHP Using EasyApache 4 

1. Login to WHM and access EasyApache 4 by using the search bar.

       WHM >> Software >> EasyApache 4

2. Once you have navigated to EasyApache 4 you can view, customize and provision available EasyApache profiles.  Click the  button under Currently Installed Packages.

Note:
By default EasyApache 4 comes with additional profiles that help minimize setup up time as there are a few options tailored to the end users’ needs. If needed you still have the ability to create your own profiles for even further customization. For more information on EasyApache 4 profiles, you can view this documentation from cPanel.

3. From the “Apache MPMmenu you can select which MultiProcessing Module, or “MPM” you would like to use.  This will determine how Apache will handle incoming requests and how it processes them. You can select which MPM you would like to use by clicking the toggle button to the right of the module. If you are unsure on which MPM to use, check our tutorial to help you decide. Once selected click Next.

4. The “Apache Modules” section will allow you to select and install needed Apache Modules.  Once the needed modules are selected, click Next. Apache Modules can add extra functionality to Apache.  For example, the mod_ssl module can be selected from this interface.  This allows Apache to process traffic using the Secure Sockets Layer “SSL v2/3” and TLS “Transport Layer Security”. For more Information on Apache Modules visit this link, which details more specific information on Apache Modules.

5. From the PHP Versions menu, you can select which versions of PHP you wish to install.  WHM will automatically check for extensions currently being used by other versions of PHP on your server.  More than likely these extensions are currently being used by one of your domains, and because of this, we recommend selecting the PHP X.X and Extensions button when selecting a version.  After you have selected the versions you want to install, click Next.

Note:
If possible we would highly recommend using the most recent version of PHP as PHP version 5.6 and 7.0 will no longer have security updates as of January 1, 2019. For more information on supported PHP versions visit this link.

6. From the next menu, the PHP Extensions menu, you can select all PHP extensions you require.  PHP extensions enable particular functions used in your PHP code, an example of this would be if your PHP code communicates with MySQL you will need to utilize the mysqlnd extension.  EasyApache 4 has already selected recommended extensions that existed on previously installed versions of PHP on your server by default.   A good tip is to limit the selection view to only the version of PHP you are installing.  You can do so at the top of this page by deselecting the boxes next to Filter by PHP Version.  Once you have selected your PHP extensions click Next.

7.  The next two sections are not commonly used, however, they are included for those that require these functions.  Ruby via Passenger allows you to integrate Ruby, Node.js, and Python applications on your server.  Within this menu, you can install/select which Ruby modules you would like to use.  More information on this can be found in this link

Within the Additional Packages menu, you can select custom packages to be installed on your server.  Currently, by default, the only option available is Tomcat 8.5.  Tomcat is a Java Servlet Container that allows you to run Javabased application on your server. You can save the profile to be used for later by clicking Save as profile button on the bottom-right corner of the page.

Once you have finished your selections, click Next or Review.   You should see a notification like the one we have included below.  This can take a few minutes to complete so allow it some time to poll your results.

8.  Please be sure to review this next page to make sure you have selected the desired configuration. If you notice anything is missing or should be changed, you may return to the relevant menu to adjust the selections. Once reviewed, scroll down to the bottom of the page and click the Provision” button.Once you have begun provisioning, please allow EasyApache some time to finish.  You will be prompted once the process has finished.

Congratulations, you have selected an MPM, installed additional Apache Modules, PHP versions, and PHP extensions using EasyApache 4.

 

Using the MultiPHP Manager from WHM

cPanel’s MultiPHP Manager allows users to manage cPanel accounts PHP configuration on a per domain basis.  This feature is only available on EasyApache 4.  You can also set the systems default global PHP version for all accounts, enable PHP-FPM globally or per domain, and adjust PHP-FPM pool options.

Selecting System default PHP Version 

  1. Navigate to the MultiPHP Manager (WHM >> Software >> MultiPHP Manager)
    Note:
    Setting the system default PHP version will not change the PHP version for all domains. Your cPanel account “if not defined” is set to inherit by default. If the inherit option is enabled, the account will use the system’s default PHP version.
  1. Click Edit under System PHP Versions.
  1. Select the desired PHP version and click Apply. You should see a Success notification at the top right of the page if the change was successful.  It will also display any errors that may have occurred. 

Define PHP Versions per Domain

Within the MultiPHP Manager, you also can set the desired PHP version on a per domain basis.  

  1. Select the domain or accounts you wish to alter.
  2. Click the dropdown menu located in the PHP column.
  3. Select your desired PHP version. The interface will prompt you once the change has completed.

 

Changing PHP Versions on Multiple Accounts

  1. Select which accounts you would like to alter by clicking the check boxes next to the domain.
  2. Click the dropdown located in the type right.
  3. Select the desired PHP version and click Apply The interface will prompt you once the change has completed.

 

MultiPHP INI Editor

MultiPHP INI Editor is a great tool that allows you to manage PHP settings per version.  You can quickly edit the most commonly adjusted PHP directives from within the Basic Mode or for more advanced users you can edit the configuration files directly using the Editor Mode.   For information on directives, please read PHP’s documentation which can be found here.

To access the MultiPHP INI Editor login into WHM. (WHM >> Home >> Software >> MultiPHP INI Editor)

Basic Mode allows you to view and edit directive values for your selected PHP version.  WHM will save changes to the PHP configuration file.  Also, directives will only show if the version of PHP you are editing supports that directive. With WHM assistance this greatly helps minimize errors as the syntax within these files are sensitive.  

Edit PHP Configuration Using MultiPHP INI Editor in Basic Mode

  1. Select a PHP version from the dropdown menu.
  2. Adjust directives as needed.  For example, you can increase upload_max_filesize by editing the field to the right of the directive.
  3.  Click Apply to submit changes.  If the edit was submitted successfully WHM will notify you at the top right of the page.  It will also inform you if any errors have occurred.
  4. Adjust directives as needed.  For example, you can increase upload_max_filesize by editing the field to the right of the directive. 
  5.  Click Apply to submit changes.  If the edit was submitted successfully WHM will notify you at the top right of the page.  It will also inform you if any errors have occurred.

 

Edit PHP Configuration Using MultiPHP INI Editor in Editor Mode

Editor Mode allows you to modify additional directives and PHP configurations that are not available in Basic Mode.  Please note, errors within this interface can result in errors causing PHP scripts not to function correctly.  Unlike Basic Mode which loads directives available to that version of PHP, Editor Mode loads the contents from the .ini file for the selected PHP version.  If the file does not exist then, the interface will load a blank editor.  When saving values or configurations to a blank editor, the systems will create a new file. 

  1. From within MultiPHP INI Editor click the Editor Mode tab. 
  2. Click the dropdown menu to select PHP Version.
  3. The Editor will open the file as a text document. From here you can simply edit the configuration to your needs.
  1. Click Save to submit your changes.  If the changes were successful WHM will display a success notification in the top right of the screen as well as any errors that may have occurred.  

EasyApache 4 makes adjustments and server tuning a breeze.  However, there is still a chance the end user can make a fatal mistake.  A quick call to our support staff could bring a quick resolution to your issue.  There are some cases where the best solution possible, is the fastest the end user can apply themselves.  For cases such as these, we would highly recommend utilizing our Cloud Backups.  Cloud Backups offer an extra layer of protection as your backups are stored on a remote device we manage here at Liquid Web.  This ensures full restoration in the unlikely event of a total system failure. The end user can manage and restore easily from our manage page.  For more information on how Cloud Backups can work for you visit products page