How to Install Pip on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Arguably one of the easiest tools to use for installing and managing Python packages, Pip has earned is notoriety by the number of applications utilizing this tool. Fancied for its capabilities in handling binary packages over the easy_installed packaged manager, pip enables 3rd party package installations. Though Python does sometimes come with pip as a default, this tutorial will show how to install, check its version as well as some basic commands for using pip on Ubuntu 16.04.

 

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended for an Ubuntu 16.04 LTS server, and we are logged in as root.
  • If you are using a different operating system, check out our other pip installation guides.

Step 1: 

Ensure that all packages are up-to-date. After running the command below, you’ll get an output of any packages getting their update.

apt-get update

Step 2:

Install pip with cURL and Python. Downloading using the cURL command ensures the latest version of pip.curl "https://bootstrap.pypa.io/get-pip.py" -o "get-pip.py"
python get-pip.py

Step 3: 

Verifying the installation of pip:

pip --version

Output:
pip --version
pip 18.0 from /usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/pip (python 2.7)

Installing Libraries

Pip can install 3rd party packages like Django, Tensorflow, Numpy, Pandas and many more with the following command.

pip install <library_name>

 

Searching for Libraries

You can also search for other libraries in Python’s repository via command line. For our example let’s look for Django packages. The search command shows us an extensive list similar to the one below.

pip search django
django-bagou (0.1.0) - Django Websocket for Django
django-maro (0.0.2) - `django-maro` is utility for django.
django-hooked (0.1.7) - WebHooks for Django and Django Rest Framework.
django-ide (0.0.5) - A Django app to develop Django apps
django-mailwhimp (0.1) - django-mailwhimp integrates mailchimp into Django
django-six (1.0.4) - Django-six —— Django Compatibility Library
django-umanage (1.1.1) - Django user management app for django
django-nadmin (0.1.0) - django nadmin support django version 1.8 based on django-xadmin
diy-django (1.3.1) - diy-django

 

Uninstalling a Library

If you don’t need the library and your scripts use them you can uninstall easily with this command:

pip uninstall

 

Installing Python Resources

Many times Python packages have a requirements.txt file, if you see this file, you can run this command to install all libraries in that package

pip install -r requirements.txt

 

How to Install and Configure phpMyAdmin on Ubuntu 16.XX

PhpMyAdmin is a user-friendly graphical interface to interact with MySQL/MariaDB and is a cornerstone of any webhosting environment. Because of this, it is also a commonly exploited part of the server and should be connected to with https://. If you have not yet installed an SSL on your domain, its good idea to do so for security with phpMyAdmin.

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Generating a Certificate Signing Request (CSR) in Ubuntu 16.04

This guide will walk you through the steps to create a Certificate Signing Request, (CSR for short.) SSL certificates are the industry-standard means of securing web traffic to and from your server, and the first step to getting your own SSL is to generate a CSR. This guide is written specifically for Ubuntu 16.04.

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How to Install NVM (Node Version Manager) for Node.js on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Node Version Manager, also known as NVM is used to control and manage multiple active versions of Node.js in one system. It is a command line utility and a bash script that allows programmers to shift between different versions of Node.js. They will be able to install any version using a single command and setting defaults using the command line utility.

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Accessing man pages on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Having access to man pages on your server is a pretty essential asset to be familiar with. If you’re not familiar with man pages they are documentation provided with software packages on Unix systems. They provide a sort of manual for applications, services and system resources. You can learn more about man pages in our introductory article. By default on Ubuntu based servers this command is not provided, since it’s a great tool to have access to this article will help you get them setup.

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Installing and using UFW on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

On an Ubuntu server the default firewall management command is iptables. While iptables provides powerful functionality it’s syntax is often seen as complex. For most users a friendlier syntax can make managing your firewall much easier.

The uncomplicated firewall (UFW) is an alternative program to iptables for managing firewall rules. Most typical Ubuntu installations will include UFW by default. In cases where UFW isn’t included it’s just a quick command away! Continue reading “Installing and using UFW on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS”

How To Install Git on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Git is one of the most popular tools used for distributed version control system(VCS). Git is commonly used for source code management (SCM) and has become more used than old VCS systems like SVN.

Installing Git on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Pre-Flight Check
  • You should be running a server with any Ubuntu 16.04 LTS release.
  • You will need to log in to SSH via the root user.
  • In this tutorial I’ll be working with a Core Managed Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS server

First, as always, we should start out by running general OS and package updates. On Ubuntu we’ll do this by running:apt-get update

After you have run the general updates on the server you can get started with installing Git.

  1. Install Git
    apt-get install git-coreYou may be asked to confirm the download and installation; simply enter y to confirm. It’s that simple, git should be installed and ready to use!
  2. Confirm Git the installation
    With the main installation done, first check to ensure the executable file is setup and accessible. The best way to do this is simply to run git with the version command.
    git --version

    git version 2.7.4
  3. Configure Git’s settings (for the root user)
    It’s a good idea to setup your user for git now, to prevent any commit errors later. We’ll setup the user testuser with the e-mail address testuser@example.com.

    git config --global user.name "testuser"
    git config --global user.email "testuser@example.com"
    Note:
    It’s important to know that git configs work on a user by user basis. For example if you have a ‘david’ Linux user and they will be working with git then David should run the same commands from his user account. By doing this the commits made by the ‘david’ Linux user will be done under his details in git.
  4. Verify the Config changes
    Now we’ll verify the configuration changes by viewing the .gitconfig file. You can do this a few ways, we’ll show you both methods here.

    1. View the config file using cat with the following command:
      cat ~/.gitconfig
    2. Or, you can also view the same details using the git config command:
      git config --list

And that’s it! You have now installed Git on your Ubuntu 16.04 LTS server and have it configured on your root user. You can get rolling with your code changes from here, or you can repeat steps 3 and 4 for the other system user accounts.

How to Install Git on Ubuntu 15.04

Introduction

Git is an open source, distributed version control system (VCS). It’s commonly used for source code management (SCM), with sites like GitHub offering a social coding experience, and popular projects such as Perl, Ruby on Rails, and the Linux kernel using it.

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended for installing Git on Ubuntu 15.04.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed Ubuntu 15.04 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

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How to Install the Memcached PHP Extension on Ubuntu 15.04

Memcached is a distributed, high-performance, in-memory caching system that is primarily used to speed up sites that make heavy use of databases. It can, however, be used to store objects of any kind. Nearly every popular CMS has a plugin or module to take advantage of Memcached, and many programming languages have a Memcached library, including PHP, Perl, Ruby, and Python. Memcached runs in memory and is thus quite speedy since it does not need to write data to disk.

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended specifically for installing the Memcached PHP Extension on a single Ubuntu 15.04 node.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed Ubuntu 15.04 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.
  • Follow our tutorial on How to Install Memcached on Ubuntu 15.04 prior to this KB!

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How to Install and Configure vsftpd on Ubuntu 15.04

FTP (File Transfer Protocol) is likely the most well-known method of uploading files to a server; a wide array of FTP servers, such as vsftpd, and clients exist for every platform.

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended specifically for installing the vsfptd on Ubuntu 15.04.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed Ubuntu 15.04 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

Continue reading “How to Install and Configure vsftpd on Ubuntu 15.04”