How to Change Your Hostname in Ubuntu 16.04

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Times are changing, and possibly your hostname is too if you are reading this article.  You may have come across a scenario within your business that requires you to change your hostname.  You might ask yourself why you would need to change your hostname? The most common scenarios would be due to a domain name change, your business has changed its course, or because you have thought of something better.

Sometimes you might forget to renew the domain names before they expire. Unfortunately, this can be a time where a domain brokers purchases you domain name.  These are agencies who take popular sites and purchase with the intent of holding the domain until their inflated price is met.  As unfortunate as this may be, sometimes it is best to purchase a new domain name for cost efficiency.

Note
When purchasing domains from Liquid Web you can always select the option to Auto Renew within our portal Domains >> My Domains

 

Benefits to using a Fully Qualified Domain Name for your Hostname

It is good practice to use your FQDN Fully Qualified Domain Name as your hostname. Following this practice creates more options for securing your hostname with an SSL.  This will allow services like email to function using a secured connection. Using a hostname with a registered domain will allow you to add a corresponding DNS entry.  This will prevent unpredictable behavior by some services that use the hostname. This would allow you to set up a reverse lookup DNS entry. It can be very important especially with services like email verfication.  For example, when an email is sent the receiving server runs a reverse lookup on the sender’s hostname. The reverse lookup allows receivers server to ensure the hostname resolves to the matching IP address. This is just one preventive measure servers now use to reduce email spoofing incidents.

By using a unique domain name, you can reduce editing time. You may have a script that calls to the servers IP, instead of the hostname, to correctly function.  Best practice is to use the hostname because future migrations may change IP addresses/ranges.  Using the hostname can save you a lot of time in the long run, depending on your infrastructure and coding.

 

Using SSH for Windows 10, 7/8, and Mac OS X

We’ll need to connect to your server.  For this article, we will be using SSH “Secure Shell” to access the server and issues commands.  SSH is a powerful tool that will allow us to establish a secure connection with your server, diagnose, and issue remote commands.  For more information on the SSH protocol, you can visit the following links.

There are a few ways to use SSH depending on your operating system. We’ve have included some examples below followed by links with more information.

Windows 10

Using SSH client in Windows 10

Note
Note: Because the OpenSSH client was introduced in the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update, you’ll need to first update to at least that version of the operating system.

Windows 7/8

Unfortunately, for older versions of Windows, it is not exactly possible to set up an SSH natively to connect to your server.  Thankfully, applications were created to assist. We like to use MobaXterm, but Putty is a safe choice as well. Both of these applications are free to use and simple to set up. We’ve included links below with more information on these applications.

Mac OS X

Newer Mac operating systems come with an excellent utility to access SSH called Terminal. To access Terminal navigate to your Applications folder >> Utilities folder >> Terminal.

In case Terminal is inefficient for your preference, there are other options available in the App store or through a quick search on Google . Putty is also available on Mac!

 

Changing the Hostname in Ubuntu 16.04

At this point, you should be able to access your server using SSH.  Once you have accessed your server, you will want to either switch to the root user or run these commands using sudo.  The files you will be accessing are owned by root. Because of this, you will need root privileges.

To start things off, we will want to edit /etc/hostname and the /etc/hosts files.  You can do so by using a text editor of your choice. We will demonstrate how to accomplish this task using the text editor called VIM.  Some of these command line text editors can seem complicated, we will include the “sed” command to make things even easier.

Switching to root user:

# su – root

Editing the hostname and hosts file:

# vim /etc/hostname

# vim /etc/hosts

Once you have opened these files, you will need to change your hostname as follows:

  1. Press the i key to insert.  This will allow you to edit.  You will notice the editor says “Insert” at the bottom of the page.
  2. Use the arrow keys to navigate the cursor to your old hostname.
  3. Backspace to delete single characters
  4. Replace with the new hostname.  Be sure the syntax is correct.
  5. When done editing hit the ESC key to exit insert mode.
  6. Then hold shift andpress the : key
  7. Finally, type wq and press enter key. This will write to the file and quit the editor
  8. Repeat for /etc/hostname

As we mentioned earlier, the command line text editors can appear to be overly complicated, especially when you’re used to programs like Word and the Window’s text editor.  Because of this, we have included the command below.

Note
Change host.example.com to your old hostname. Change host.newhostname.com to your new hostname

# sed -i 's/host.example.com/host.newhostname.com/g' /etc/hosts

# sed -i 's/host.example.com/host.newhostname.com/g' /etc/hostname

After editing these files, you’ll need to reboot the server. If you wish to reboot at a later time but still want your new hostname to take immediate effect click on this sentence to skip ahead. Otherwise, you can do so by running

# reboot

Your SSH session should be terminated.  Depending on your server it can take a few minutes to boot back up.  Once the server is back online you can check your changes by running the following command:

# hostname

If all went well, the terminal should output your new hostname.

If you wish to reboot at a later time but still want your new hostname to take immediate effect, you can use the hostname command to temporarily set the hostname until the next reboot.  From there, the changes in /etc/hosts and /etc/hostname will take permanent effect.

# hostname host.newhostname.com

There is also an alternative available.  The hostnamectl command is default for both Desktop and Server versions. They combine setting the hostname via the hostname  command, editing  /etc/hostname and setting the static hostname. Unfortunately, editing /etc/hosts still has to be done separately.

Example:

# hostnamectl set-hostname host.newhostname.com

 

Common Issue after Hostname Update

The “Failed to start hostname.service: Unit hostname.service is masked” error can happen when there is a syntax error within the /etc/hostname, or /etc/hosts file, or when the hostname does not match between these two files.  Be sure to check both of these files for mistakes and correct them as needed. In newer versions of Ubuntu, you will also want to use the hostnamectl command mentioned earlier.  

# hostnamectl set-hostname host.newhostname.com

Once corrected, be sure to start the hostname service to see if the issue has been corrected. You can do so by running the command that we have included below. Afterward, we would recommend rebooting your server.  This is not always necessary, but in some cases, it is required.

# systemctl restart hostname  

As always, Liquid Web customer’s enjoy 24/7 technical support with changing your hostname. Reach out to our sales team to see how you can get into our lightening fast servers today!

 

How To Add a DNS Record For Your Hostname in Manage

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Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended for domain names using Liquid Web’s nameservers.
  • If the main domain uses other nameservers, such as at a registrar, you will need to log in there and add an “A” record for the hostname in the main domain’s DNS zone file. The record should point to the server’s primary IP address.

Continue reading “How To Add a DNS Record For Your Hostname in Manage”

How to Resize a Server

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Upgrading your Cloud VPS server is a simple process, and can be done in just a few satisfying clicks. Upgrades are a necessity. You work hard on your blog, or ecommerce store, and the traffic grows! Once you’ve optimized your WordPress site or Magento store, reward yourself with an easy upgrade process and increase the available resources to your Cloud VPS by following the steps below. This process can be followed for Cloud VPS or Cloud Dedicated servers.

Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended specifically for resizing your Cloud server.

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How to Upgrade Your VPS

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Upgrading your Storm® VPS (Virtual Private Server) is a simple process, and can be done in just a few satisfying clicks. Upgrades are a necessity. Let’s face it, you work hard on your blog, or ecommerce store, and the traffic grows! So, once you’ve optimized your WordPress site or Magento store, reward yourself with an easy upgrade process and increase the available resources to your Storm® VPS by following the steps below!

Pre-Flight Check

Continue reading “How to Upgrade Your VPS”