How To Enable Server Backups in WHM/cPanel

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The most important thing you can do to protect your server against data loss is to take regular backups. Properly configured backups are a critical aspect to the maintenance of any website and can mean the difference between a quick recovery and rebuilding a site from scratch. If a critical file were to be deleted accidentally, a database became irreparably corrupted, or your site was infected with malware, would you be able to restore your data and get your site back up within a few minutes? 

If you can’t answer “yes” to these questions, then it’s time to review your backup strategy.

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Using The One-Time Secret Tool In Manage

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In order for one of our clients to start using the ‘one time secret’ tool within manage, you will need to login to the Manage portal to get started. Typically, passwords are not meant to be shared. Unfortunately, sometimes you will need to share a password or other sensitive data with the support admin you are working with. Regrettably, trying to pass along individuals character over the phone can be frustrating, annoying, and overly time consuming, and more so when a password is long and if the phone has a bad connection.

So, what can we do when it is time to share a password with support? Using the One Time Secret tool in your Liquid Web account allows you and your Heroic Support admin to share a password in a safe and secure manner that will enable them access to your password or other sensitive data.

The One Time Secret tool is also useful when you need us to change a server’s root password for you or, we need a cpanel password to assist you with a support request.

Note:
The username and IP address of the secret submitter are kept in logs stored internally, as well as timestamps for submission, and retrieval or expiration.

So, how do we access and utilize this tool? Let’s jump right in…

  1. Log into your Liquid Web account.
  2. From the home page of your account, click on Account in the left side menu and then, one the “Secrets” tab.secrets tab
    Warning:
    One Time Secret is not available for HIPAA customers.
  3. This will open the One-Time Secret home page.
    one-time secret home page
  4. Click Create New One-Time Secret.create new button highlighted
  5. Enter the message or password you need to share with us. This will encrypt the message and store it in an internal database.secret created
  6. Click Submit One-Time Secret to save your password. Click the link below to view the secure one-time secret.

submit button highlighted

Both you and the admin can now view the password. Passwords are decrypted when the secret is viewed.

Caution:
Your secret is only viewable once before it is removed forever. Additionally, if the secret is not viewed within 24 hours, it is removed from the One Time Secret tool.

Have more questions about this tool? Reach out to one of our Heroic Support admins 24 hours a day, 365 days a year by creating a ticket at support@liquidweb.com, opening a chat with us or giving us a call at 1-800-580-4985. We are always looking forward to providing an answer to any questions you may have!

Thank you for hosting with Liquidweb!

Where is the Apache configuration in CentOS?

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Apache Main Configuration Files

On a CentOS server, the package manager used to install the Apache web server (such as rpm, yum, or dnf) will typically default to placing the main Apache configuration file in of one of the following locations on the server:

/etc/apache2/httpd.conf
/etc/apache2/apache2.conf
/etc/httpd/httpd.conf
/etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf

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Why Choose CentOS 6 or 7

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Introduction

The servers that run our applications, our businesses, all depend on the stability and underlying features offered by the operating system (or OS) installed. As administrators, we have to plan ahead and think to the future of how our users will use the machines we oversee while simultaneously ensuring that those machines remain stable and online. There are numerous operating systems to choose from; however one of the most popular, most stable, and highly supported OSes is CentOS. A combination of excellent features, rock-solid performance stability, and the backing of enterprise-focused institutions such as Red Hat and Fedora have led to CentOS becoming a mainstay OS that administrators can count on.

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How To Install the LAMP Stack on CentOS 7

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Whether you’re new to hosting websites or a seasoned developer, you’ve more than likely heard of a LAMP stack. The LAMP stack is the base set of applications that most websites running on a Linux server are served from and is commonly referred to as “Lamp”. Rather than a single program that interacts with the website being served, LAMP is actually a number of independent programs that operate in tandem: Linux, Apache, MySQL/MariaDB, and PHP. Throughout this article, we’ll walk through installing the LAMP stack on your CentOS 7 server so you can run a website from any Dedicated Server or Virtual Private Server. Although we’re focusing on installing LAMP on a CentOS 7 server, the steps that we’ll cover are very similar across multiple Linux distributions.

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How To Manually Set Up Clients in WHMCS

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WHMCS is an amazingly capable software allowing you to manage your clients from initial purchase, continued support, and billing management. However, if you already have clients and you’re looking to get started with WHMCS, you will need to get those clients into the new system. While this process does require some manual work, it is absolutely possible and once they are set up, the automation can take over from there! In this guide, I will show you how to manually set up your existing clients into WHMCS.

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How to Check for Installed Packages on CentOS

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While managing your server, you’ll sometimes need to check on which software (or packages) you have installed on your system. You’ll need to know package names, version numbers, dates of installation, etc. In this Liquid Web tutorial, we’re going to be discussing how to inspect packages installed on your CentOS system. There are several ways to accomplish this, and we’ll discuss a few of them. Let’s dig in! To use these commands, you’ll need to log in to your server via SSH. For more information, see Logging into Your Server via Secure Shell (SSH).

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How Do I Connect My Mac to Windows?

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Mac users work in their native Unix environment are familiar with using the terminal to SSH into their Linux based servers. When using a Mac to log into a Windows environment, or vice versa,  the task is performed differently. Window machines use a different protocol, one aptly named RDP (Remote Desktop Protocol). For our tutorial, we’ll explore how to use your Mac to connect to a Windows server.  Let’s get started!

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How to Set Up A Firewall Using Iptables on Ubuntu 16.04

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This guide will walk you through the steps for setting up a firewall using iptables in Ubuntu 16.04. We’ll show you some common commands for manipulating the firewall, and teach you how to create your own rules.

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How to Install MariaDB on Ubuntu 18.04

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MariaDB is a drop in replacement for MySQL, and its popularity makes for several other applications to work in conjunction with it. If you’re interested in a MariaDB server without the maintenance, then check out our high-availability platform. Otherwise, we’ll be installing MariaDB 10 onto our Liquid Web Ubuntu server, let’s get started! Continue reading “How to Install MariaDB on Ubuntu 18.04”