How to Stop and Disable Firewalld on Fedora 22

It is highly recommended that you have another firewall protecting your network or server before, or immediately after, disabling firewalld.

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended specifically for stopping and disabling firewalld on Fedora 22.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Self Managed Fedora 22 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

Continue reading “How to Stop and Disable Firewalld on Fedora 22”

Find (View) Default Zone for Firewalld on CentOS 7

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended for finding (viewing) the default zone in Firewalld on CentOS 7 via the command line.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed CentOS 7 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

Continue reading “Find (View) Default Zone for Firewalld on CentOS 7”

Find (View) Active Zones in Firewalld on CentOS 7

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended for finding (viewing) active zones in Firewalld on CentOS 7 via the command line.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed CentOS 7 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

Continue reading “Find (View) Active Zones in Firewalld on CentOS 7”

How to Securely Transfer Files via rsync and SSH on Linux

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended specifically for transferring files between servers via rsync and SSH on Linux.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed CentOS 7 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

Continue reading “How to Securely Transfer Files via rsync and SSH on Linux”

How to Enable Two-factor Authentication (2FA)

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended specifically for enabling two-factor authentication for Manage users.

What is Two-factor Authentication (2FA)?

Two-factor authentication (also known as 2FA) means that instead of just a password (one factor), you will need two factors (password, plus a rotating authentication token) to login to your Manage account. Only the correct combination of the first and second factors will allow you to log in. Two-factor authentication is more secure than one-factor authentication.

How to Enable Two-factor Authentication (2FA)

Continue reading “How to Enable Two-factor Authentication (2FA)”

Information on CVE-2015-3456 QEMU Vulnerability (VENOM)

Overview

VENOM, or Virtualized Environment Neglected Operations Manipulation, was made public on May 13, 2015. The vulnerability is in QEMU, a generic and open source machine emulator and virtualizer that is utilized by Xen, KVM, and other modern hypervisors / virtualization platforms.

Impact

Specifically a flaw with how QEMU handles out-of-bounds memory access, exploitation can cause the entire hypervisor to crash and may allow an attacker to access other virtual machines outside of their own.

Summary
  • Made public on May 13, 2015
  • This flaw exploits QEMU, a generic and open source machine emulator.
  • Allows for an attacker to access other virtual machines outside of their own.
Resolution

A patch is available, and Liquid Web’s Heroic Support has proactively scheduled a reboot to patch all affected servers.

Continue reading “Information on CVE-2015-3456 QEMU Vulnerability (VENOM)”

How to Prevent Being Hacked by the Cross-site Scripting Vulnerability in WP Super Cache

The popular WordPress plugin WP Super Cache has been found to have a cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in versions prior to 1.4.4. On sites with outdated versions, it is possible for an attacker to take complete control of the WordPress site. Please note: this vulnerability only affects users which have installed WP Super Cache. However, if you are unsure if you use the plugin or not you should still take precautions to protect your site.

Thankfully, this is vulnerability is simple to address; version 1.4.4, available now, contains a patch.

This tutorial is very similar to our tutorial on updating any WordPress plugin: How To Update a WordPress Plugin

Continue reading “How to Prevent Being Hacked by the Cross-site Scripting Vulnerability in WP Super Cache”

How to Update a WordPress Plugin

Step 1: Login to WordPress as Administrator

Hopefully, you’re already well-versed in logging into your WordPress site as an administrator!

Step 2: Access Updates

If there is an update for a plugin or a theme, then you’ll likely have a number in the top bar and next to Updates as shown below (the number 5). Click on Updates!

How To Update a WordPress Plugin - 01

Step 3: Select All the Plugins

Check the box for Select All:

How To Update a WordPress Plugin - 02

Step 4: Update the Plugins

Click on Update Plugins:

How To Update a WordPress Plugin

And at the end of the update process you should receive something similar to, All updates have been completed.

How To Update a WordPress Plugin

Try a Free Cloud Server.

Trying a new server is a breeze, and it’ll be up and running in only a few minutes...

How to Check the glibc (GNU libc) Version on Fedora 20 and Fedora 21

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended specifically for checking the installed version of glibc.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Self Managed Fedora 20 and Fedora 21 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

Continue reading “How to Check the glibc (GNU libc) Version on Fedora 20 and Fedora 21”