Managing a Linux Server with Systemd

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What is systemd?

Systemd is the System Management Daemon, which provides a standard for controlling the Linux boot process. It is named per the UNIX convention of adding ‘d’ to the end of daemon’s name. Systemd is intended as a drop-in replacement for the very common init start-up scripts for the boot process (which is also referred to as System V or SysV).

Though there is some debate regarding the benefits of systemd, the advantages do include: Service Reporting (failed? suspended? error?), Process Monitoring (kills user processes at logout), and Parallel Processes (multiple services are able to start at same time, improving boot times).

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chkconfig Command Examples for Red Hat and CentOS

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chkconfig is a command for checking and updating runlevel information for system services. For a primer on runlevels, check out our tutorial: Linux Runlevels Explained.

Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended specifically for checking and updating chkconfig.
  • I’ll be working from both a Liquid Web Core Managed CentOS 7 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

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Set Up a Default Webserver and Limit Access

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Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended to address specifically the following scenario: Set Up a Default Configuration Webserver and Limit Access
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Self Managed CentOS 6.5 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

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Linux Runlevels Explained

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A runlevel is one of the modes that a Unix -based operating system will run in. Each runlevel has a certain number of services stopped or started, giving the user control over the behavior of the machine. Conventionally, seven runlevels exist, numbered from zero to six.
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