Why Is Most of My Memory Being Used?

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Often we hear a lot of customers asking why, when their server is largely idle, much of their RAM appears to be in use.

When RAM is not needed for other functions, your server will load frequently-accessed files into memory in order to read them more quickly. When a file is loaded into RAM, the server can access the information orders of magnitude faster than from disk. A modern SSD disk can read files at up to around 500-700 MB/second, if the files are in sequential units. However, RAM can be read at GB/second rates; or even tens of GB/second.

If the RAM becomes needed for another function, these files are quickly flushed out of memory, and the RAM becomes available for other tasks. Continue reading “Why Is Most of My Memory Being Used?”

Enable Remote MySQL Connections in cPanel

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Remote MySQL connections are disabled by default in cPanel servers because they are considered a potential security threat. Using the tools in the Web Host Manager (WHM) and the domain-level cPanel interface (usually http://domainname.com/cpanel) remote hosts can be added which the server allows to connect to the MySQL service.

Before using either of the following techniques, you will need to to open up port 3306 in your server’s firewall.

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How to Display (List) All Jobs in Cron / Crontab

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Servers can automatically perform tasks that you would otherwise have to perform yourself, such as running scripts. On Linux servers, the cron utility is the preferred way to automate the running of scripts. In this article we’ll cover how to view the jobs scheduled in the crontab list. For an introduction to Cron check-out our KB: How To: Automate Server Scripts With Cron. Knowing how to setup crontab is an important skill, but even if you’re not editing these knowing how to view them is important as well. Continue reading “How to Display (List) All Jobs in Cron / Crontab”

How To: Upgrade Apache and PHP using cPanel’s Easyapache

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Note:
Please note that this article is considered legacy documentation because EasyApache 3 has reached its end-of-life support.

If you run a cPanel server, and need to upgrade your Apache or PHP version, cPanel provides the Easyapache tool to make these updates a breeze. While it can be run from WHM, it is generally preferred to run it from the command line.

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Apache Error: “semget: No space left on device”

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If Apache fails, and will not successfully start again, check the error log. If you see an error similar to the following, it could indicate that your server has run out of semaphores.

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WordPress Tutorial 3: How to Install a New Plugin, Theme, or Widget

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This is part 3 in an ongoing series on WordPress. Please see Part 1: WordPress Tutorial 1: Installation Setup and Part 2: WordPress Tutorial 2: Terminology and Part 4: WordPress Tutorial 4: Recommended WordPress Plugins. Please note that this guide is primarily intended for customers utilizing a Linux server running cPanel. If you do not have a Linux server with cPanel please see the documentation at wordpress.org for further assistance.

The three most common changes you will make to your website involve the look (themes), the functionality (plugins), and modular elements (widgets).
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Setting Alternate SMTP port in Plesk on Linux

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Getting Plesk to listen for SMTP connections on an alternate port is not that difficult to do. However unlike a cPanel environment, configuring Plesk to do so must be done outside of the control panel via the command line.

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