What Are Domains?

Domains create your address on the internet. When you own a domain, you can tell people to go to the URL mysite.com and they will see whatever content you’ve associated with that domain. Every domain name is matched to an IP address and follows the Domain Name System (DNS).

Without a domain, every website would only be identified by the IP address. Imagine that instead of typing liquidweb.com into your web browser, you had to remember 67.43.15.214, Liquid Web’s IP address. Now imagine remembering strings of numbers for every website you ever want to visit!

example of domain name and site

Domain names make it much easier for people to use the internet. It’s the difference between using latitude and longitude to get somewhere and using a street address to get somewhere.

Let’s use support.liquidweb.com to show how domain names work. Even though it is a little confusing for most people, domain names are technically read from right to left. No one reads them like this when telling you to visit support.liquidweb.com, of course! But reading from right to left creates a funnel: the address goes from the very general (top-level domain) to the very specific.

Top-Level Domains

Top-level domains (TLDs) like com, net, and org hold the right-most position in a domain name. Every country can have their own TLD, too. Every domain name must end with a TLD. In support.liquidweb.com, the TLD is com.

example of TLD

Second-Level Domains (and Beyond)

Whatever is directly to the left of the TLD is called the second-level domain. In the example support.liquidweb.comliquidweb is the second-level domain. Anything to the left of the second-level domain is the third-level domain. In this case, support is the third-level domain. This can go on and on as long as there are more domains to the left. The more levels you use, the more specific your address is.

example of second-level domain

When you purchase a domain name, you buy the right to use a specific TLD and second-level domain. So, you’d buy the right to use mysite.com (or whatever you’d like your domain to be). If you want to add further domains like blog.mysite.com, you don’t have to pay for another domain name. This is considered a subdomain and you can set it up through your domain management system, like cPanel.

example of subdomain

Now that you know the basic concepts surrounding domains, you’re ready to learn how to register your first domain!

Adding a Domain Alias in Cloud Sites

A domain alias is an alternate name for a website. A common use for domain aliases is so mysite.com and mysite.net show the same information. It’s easy to set up domain aliases in Cloud Sites.

When setting up domain aliases in Cloud Sites, remember the alias you create will show the same content as the website where you set up the alias.

  1. Log into the Cloud Sites control panel.
  2. Continue reading “Adding a Domain Alias in Cloud Sites”

Creating a Subdomain in Cloud Sites

Websites hosted on subdomains make up a large subsection of the internet. If you own a domain you can create as many subdomains as you want with it. This can be useful when you want to create isolated sections of your websites with specific functions. Creating subdomains is useful if you want to have an online store, blog, or forum.
Continue reading “Creating a Subdomain in Cloud Sites”

What is a FQDN?

What is a Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN)?

When working with domains and DNS management understanding what a FQDN is can be very helpful. This article will help explain the concept of a FQDN and a domains different components.

The Parts of a Domain

A domain is made up of a two essential parts, the Top-Level Domain (TLD) and the main Domain Name which is what you register. The other component of domain names are the subdomains. Continue reading “What is a FQDN?”

How To Create a Subdomain in cPanel

  1. This tutorial assumes you’ve already logged in to cPanel, and are starting on the home screen.

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  2. Now let’s learn how to create a subdomain.

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  3. Click the "Subdomains" icon.

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  4. Enter the prefix of your new subdomain.

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  5. Make sure the domain name your subdomain will be associated with is selected. A directory name the same as your subdomain prefix will automatically appear… although you can change this if you want.

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  6. Click the "Create" button.

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  7. That’s it! A new subdomain has been created.

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  8. A new folder called "clients" has also been created, which is where you would upload files for this subdomain.

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