How To Modify an Existing Email Account in Thunderbird

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended specifically for setting up an email account in Mozilla Thunderbird 38.3.0 on Mac OS X 10.11.1.
  • While the steps should be similar across platforms and operating systems, they may not necessarily apply to older versions of Thunderbird.
  • For help with general email account settings, see How to Set up Any Email Client.

You can edit an email account that already has been configured in Thunderbird, for example should you decide to switch between non-SSL and SSL settings or change the server’s connection port. You change the connection type between standard (non-SSL) and secure (SSL) by changing the hostname and port for the incoming and outgoing servers.

Note: You cannot edit an existing email account to switch its account type from POP3 to IMAP or vice versa. To change the account type, you must add a new account of the desired type (POP3 or IMAP). Adding a new account with a different connection type should not require you to delete the old one in most mail clients.

To avoid data loss, please use caution any time you change an email account’s connection type or delete an email account. Removing an email account from a mail client also will remove all messages associated with it on the device and, specifically in the case of POP accounts that are not configured to retain mail on the server, there may be no way to recover those messages. If you have any doubt or questions, please feel free to contact Heroic Support® for guidance.

Step #1: Edit Incoming Server Settings

  1. To edit the incoming server, select your email address in the left pane and then click on View settings for this account in the main window.
  2. In the account settings window, click on Server Settings to update the Server Name and Port.incomingedit
    • Server Name
      • SSL settings will use the server’s hostname (e.g., host.yourdomainname.com)
      • Standard non-SSL settings will use the domain name (yourdomainname.com or mail.yourdomainname.com).
    • Port
      • SSL settings will use Port 993 for IMAP and Port 995 for POP3.
      • Standard non-SSL settings will use Port 143 for IMAP and Port 110 for POP3.

Step #2: Edit Outgoing Server Settings

  1. To edit the outgoing server settings, click on Outgoing Server (SMTP) in the left pane, select your outgoing server and click the Edit button.editoutgoing
  2. You can edit the server name and port in the popup window.out2
    • Server Name
      • SSL settings will use the server’s hostname (e.g., host.yourdomainname.com)
      • Standard non-SSL settings will use the domain name (yourdomainname.com or mail.yourdomainname.com).
    • Port
      • SSL settings will use Port 465.
      • Standard non-SSL settings will use Port 587 (depending on your server configuration, you may be able to use Port 25 as well).
  3. Click on the OK button to save the outgoing server settings, then click on OK once more to exit the settings menu and begin using your email account with the new settings.

 

How to Setup Email on Microsoft Outlook 2013

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How to Setup Email on Microsoft Outlook 2010

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How to Setup Email on Thunderbird

Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended specifically for setting up e-mail on Thunderbird.
  • I’ll be working from Thunderbird version 24.5.
  • If these instructions don’t quite work for you, check out our tutorial on setting up other e-mail clients.

Continue reading “How to Setup Email on Thunderbird”

How To Setup Email on Android

Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended specifically for setting up e-mail on an Android device.
  • I’ll be working from a DROID 4, and I’ll be using Android Version 4.1.2.
  • If these instructions don’t quite work for you, check out our tutorial on setting up other e-mail clients.

Continue reading “How To Setup Email on Android”

How to Configure Your Liquid Web VPN

Liquid Web offers a free Virtual Private Network (VPN) user with every account. A VPN uses encryption to secure your computer’s connection to the Internet and guarantees that all of the data you’re sending and receiving to the Liquid Web network is secured from any potential prying third parties.

Be security-minded.

A VPN will secure and encrypt inherently insecure communications (such as HTTP, FTP, SMTP, etc.) to the Liquid Web network, even while using an untrusted public network.

Who uses a VPN? People just like you.

The Professional: Whether working from a permanent home office, or simply getting a few important projects done from home, a VPN will provide secure access to files stored on your dedicated server.

Remote Developers: Do you have a fleet of remote WordPress, Joomla, PHP, Drupal, or other developers that need secure access to your hosting infrastructure? If so, a VPN is not only perfect, but should be required.

The World Traveler: Working on your top secret startup from abroad? Or perhaps uploading photos from your most recent adventure? Prevent snooping by using a VPN.

Once you’re logged into your Liquid Web Manage account, follow the steps below to create a VPN user and get connected! Continue reading “How to Configure Your Liquid Web VPN”