What is a Virtual IP (VIP)?

What is a Virtual IP (VIP)?

When you create a virtual IP (VIP) address with Liquid Web you will receive both a Public VIP and Private VIP. The public VIP can be configured on a Storm server just as a non-virtual, or standard, IP would be configured. Connecting to a public service, such as HTTP or FTP, on the Public VIP occurs just as it would on a standard IP.

The Private VIP can be configured on a Storm server’s private interface just as a standard private IP would be configured. Connecting to a private service, such as MySQL or Puppet, on the Private VIP also occurs just as it would on a standard private IP.

So why use a VIP? When utilizing multiple servers, having a VIP is beneficial due to its ability to “float” between servers. This allows the VIP to remain highly reachable in circumstances in which a non-virtual (or standard) IP may be otherwise unreachable. It is possible to move both the Public VIP and Private VIP between Storm servers!

Both Public and Private VIPs can be configured on any server on your Storm account so long is that server is in the Zone where the VIPs were created. Typically software, such as the ones listed below, is used to manage on which server a VIP resides.

Use Cases for VIPs

Here are some of the things that you can do with Virtual IP addresses:

  • High Availability Databases (MySQL, Percona, MariaDB)
  • Non-DNS-based Service Migrations
  • High Availability Web Applications (in tandem with or in place of load balancer)
Examples of Software That Can Use VIPs

This is just some of the software that you can use with Virtual IP addresses:

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How to Configure Cyberduck for Use with Storm Object Storage

Storm Object Storage delivers a durable, secure, highly available solution for storage needs of virtually any size. With object storage access occurs via API calls to the object storage cluster, which replaces the need to rely on additional servers for dedicated storage.

Here we use the client Cyberduck to interact with Storm Object Storage. Cyberduck is available for download from https://cyberduck.io/?l=en.

Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended specifically for configuring Cyberduck for use with Storm Object Storage.
  • I’ll be working from a Microsoft Windows 8 desktop with Cyberduck installed.

Continue reading “How to Configure Cyberduck for Use with Storm Object Storage”

Proactive Server Maintenance Checklist, Prior to Reboot

Take a Backup, or Be Sure Backups are Running

We have tutorials on How to Create a Storm Server Backup, and How to Restore a Storm Server Backup.

Check Running Processes

Liquid Web’s Heroic Support team closely monitors the load on your servers with Sonar® proactive monitoring and service restoration. That said, it’s always wise to glance at what processes are running on your server to assure your services are running as expected. Check-out our tutorial on Monitoring Server Processes with Top for Linux.

Verify Services Will Start at Boot

Be sure to verify that all of your necessary services are configured to start when the server boots up. For CentOS users, you can follow this tutorial: chkconfig Command Examples for Red Hat and CentOS.

Save, Save, and Save Some More

Always check whether or not there are any unsaved changes to configuration files, etc. prior to a reboot. Save early and safe often!
Continue reading “Proactive Server Maintenance Checklist, Prior to Reboot”