How To Install and Configure phpMyAdmin on Fedora 23

PhpMyAdmin is an open-source tool used for the administration of MySQL. In addition to offering the capability to perform administrative tasks such as creating, editing, or deleting databases, and managing users and permissions, phpMyAdmin provides a graphical user interface to do all of these tasks and more.

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended for installing phpMyAdmin on Fedora 23. If you’re using a different operating system, check out our guides to installing phpMyAdmin on Fedora 22, Ubuntu 15.04, CentOS 6 and CentOS 7.
  • For this tutorial, we’ll be using a Liquid Web Self Managed Fedora 23 server and logging in as root.
    A LAMP stack (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP) must be installed on your server.

Step #1: Install phpMyAdmin

First, we’ll follow best practices and ensure that the list of available packages is up to date:

dnf -y update

Then it’s a matter of running one command for installation:

dnf -y install phpmyadmin

Step #2: Find Your IP Address

You can determine your public IP address by visiting http://ip.liquidweb.com.

Step #3: Basic Configuration for phpMyAdmin

By default, the configuration for phpMyAdmin allows access only from the server on which it is installed. To be able to access phpMyAdmin’s web interface from your IP address, we’ll edit the Apache Virtual Host file created automatically during installation.

vim /etc/httpd/conf.d/phpMyAdmin.conf

For a refresher on editing files with vim, see New User Tutorial: Overview of the Vim Text Editor. If vim is not installed on your OS, you can follow our tutorial on installing vim at How to Install VIM (Visual editor IMproved) on Fedora 23.

In phpMyAdmin.conf, locate the following sections and change each IP address to the one you found in Step 2 (there should be a total of four instances of “127.0.0.1” which you’ll need to change to your IP address):

Require ip 127.0.0.1
Allow from 127.0.0.1
Require ip 127.0.0.1
Allow from 127.0.0.1

Then save and exit the file with the following command:

:wq

Now, restart Apache:

systemctl restart httpd

Verify that phpMyAdmin is working by visiting http://the_IP_of_your_server/phpmyadmin. For example: http://111.222.333.444/phpmyadmin.

Learn More

To create a database user, visit Create a MySQL User on Linux via Command Line.
To grant permissions to a database user, visit Grant Permission to a MySQL User on Linux via Command Line.
 

How To Install MySQL/MariaDB on Fedora 23

MariaDB is a drop-in replacement for MySQL. It is easy to install, offers many speed and performance improvements, and is easily integrated into most MySQL deployments. MariaDB offers more storage engines than MySQL, including Cassandra (NoSQL), XtraDB (drop-in replacement for InnoDB), and OQGRAPH.

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended for installing MariaDB on a single Fedora 23 node.
  • We’ll be working as root on a Liquid Web Self Managed Fedora 23 server.
  • If you have any questions about compatibility, you can find answers at: MariaDB versus MySQL – Compatibility.

Step #1: Install MariaDB

As always, we’ll first ensure that our existing packages are up to date:

dnf -y update

MariaDB can be installed with one command:

dnf -y install mysql-server mysql

Step #2: Start MySQL/MariaDB

Start MySQL (now MariaDB) with the following command:

systemctl start mariadb

To ensure that MySQL/MariaDB starts at boot, run the following command:

systemctl enable mariadb

That should produce output similar to the following:

[root@host ~]# systemctl enable mariadb
Created symlink from /etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants/mariadb.service to /usr/lib/systemd/system/mariadb.service.

You can check the status of MySQL/MariaDB with:

systemctl status mariadb

Step #3: Using MySQL/MariaDB

You connect to MySQL/MariaDB with the following command:

mysql

That should produce output similar to the following:

[root@host ~]# mysql
Welcome to the MariaDB monitor. Commands end with ; or \g.
Your MariaDB connection id is 5
Server version: 10.0.21-MariaDB MariaDB Server
Copyright (c) 2000, 2015, Oracle, MariaDB Corporation Ab and others.
Type 'help;' or '\h' for help. Type '\c' to clear the current input statement.

To exit and return to your command prompt, simply execute the following command:

exit
 

How To Update/Upgrade Docker on Fedora 23

Docker is a container-based software framework, commonly used for automating deployment of applications. Containers are encapsulated, lightweight, and portable application modules.

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are specifically intended for upgrading/updating Docker on Fedora 23. If you’re using an older version of Fedora, check our tutorial for Fedora 22.
  • We’ll be logging into a Liquid Web Self Managed Fedora 23 server as root.

Step #1: Upgrade/Update Docker on Fedora 23

To upgrade or update, simply enter:

dnf upgrade -y docker-io

Step #2: Other Docker Commands

Docker already should be started, but if it isn’t you can start it with the following command:

systemctl start docker

Docker also already should be configured to start when the server boots; if not, you can use the following command to do so:

systemctl enable docker

Step #3: Download a Docker Container

To get started using Docker, we’ll download the Fedora Docker image:

docker pull fedora

Step #4: Run a Docker Container

Setting up a basic Fedora container with a bash shell requires a single command, “docker”:

docker run -i -t fedora /bin/bash

Breaking down that command:

  • docker run will run a command in a new container
  • -i attaches stdin and stdout
  • -t allocates a tty
  • fedora indicates that we’ll be using the standard fedora container
  • /bin/bash provides us with our shell

That’s it! You’re now using a bash shell inside of a Fedora Docker container.

To disconnect, or detach, from the shell without exiting, use the escape sequence: Ctrl + p followed by Ctrl + q.

You can easily search for other community containers. Here, we are searching for the keyword “fedora”:

docker search fedora

Step #5: Get More Out of Docker

Learn more about Docker by reviewing the official documentation.
 

How To Install Docker on Fedora 23

Docker is a container-based software framework commonly used for automating deployment of applications. Containers are encapsulated, lightweight, and portable application modules.

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended for installing Docker on Fedora 23. If you’re using an older version of Fedora or a different operating system, check our tutorials for Fedora 21 and Ubuntu 15.04.
  • We’ll be logging into a Liquid Web Self Managed Fedora 23 server as root.

Step #1: Install Docker on Fedora 23

As a matter of best practice, we’ll update our packages:

dnf update -y

We’ll install Docker by installing the docker-io package:

dnf -y install docker-io

Once the installation completes, we’ll need to start the Docker daemon:

systemctl start docker

Now we’ll configure Docker to start when the server boots:

systemctl enable docker

That should produce output similar to the following:

[root@host ~]# systemctl enable docker
Created symlink from /etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants/docker.service to /usr/lib/systemd/system/docker.service.

Step #2: Download a Docker Container

To get started using Docker, we’ll download the Fedora Docker image:

docker pull fedora

That should produce output similar to the following:

[root@host ~]# docker pull fedora
Using default tag: latest
Trying to pull repository docker.io/library/fedora ... latest: Pulling from library/fedora
369aca82a5c0: Pull complete
3fc68076e184: Pull complete
Digest: sha256:7d916d5d3ab2d92147e515d3c09cb47a0431e2fff9d550fd9bcc4fed379af9ea
Status: Downloaded newer image for docker.io/fedora:latest

Step #3: Run a Docker Container

Setting up a basic Fedora container with a bash shell requires a single command, “docker”:

docker run -i -t fedora /bin/bash

Breaking down that command:

  • docker run will run a command in a new container
  • -i attaches stdin and stdout
  • -t allocates a tty
  • fedora indicates that we’ll be using the standard Fedora container
  • /bin/bash provides us with our shell

That’s it! You’re now using a bash shell inside of a Fedora Docker container.

To disconnect, or detach, from the shell without exiting, use the escape sequence: Ctrl + p followed by Ctrl + q.

You can easily search for other community containers. Here, we are searching for the keyword “fedora”:

docker search fedora

Step #4: Get More Out of Docker

Learn more about Docker by reviewing the official documentation.
 

How To Start and Enable Firewalld on Fedora 23

As a matter of following security best practices, you should protect your server with a firewall. Fedora 23 and CentOS 7 come with firewalld, an alternative to iptables.

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended specifically for enabling and starting firewalld on Fedora 23. The instructions are the same for CentOS 7.
  • We’ll be logging in as root on a Liquid Web Self Managed Fedora 23 server.

Enable Firewalld

To enable firewalld and have it start at boot, run the following command:

systemctl enable firewalld

Start Firewalld

To start firewalld, run the following command:

systemctl start firewalld

Check the Status of Firewalld

To check the status of firewalld, run the following command as root:

systemctl status firewalld

To stop and disable firewalld, visit How to Stop and Disable Firewalld on Fedora 23
 

How To Stop and Disable Firewalld on Fedora 23

For security best practices, do not disable firewalld without enabling another firewall solution. Disabling firewalld without enabling an alternative will leave every port on your server open and completely unprotected.

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended specifically for stopping and disabling firewalld on Fedora 23. The process is the same on CentOS 7.
  • We’ll be logging in as root to a Liquid Web Self Managed Fedora 23 server.

Your server never should be without the protection of a firewall. However, there are a few cases where disabling a firewall can be helpful, such as quickly troubleshooting a connection issue or prior to the installation of a different firewall. If you must temporarily stop and disable firewalld, then follow the instructions below.

Disable Firewalld

To disable firewalld and prevent it from starting at boot, run the following command:

systemctl disable firewalld

Stop Firewalld

To temporarily stop firewalld, run the following command:

systemctl stop firewalld

Check the Status of Firewalld

To check the status of firewalld, run the following command

systemctl status firewalld

To start and enable firewalld, visit How to Start and Enable Firewalld on Fedora 23.
 

How To Install and Configure vsftpd on Fedora 23

FTP (File Transfer Protocol) is the most common method of uploading files to a server. A wide array of FTP servers, such as vsftpd, and clients exist for every platform.

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended specifically for installing the VSFTP server on Fedora 23. If you’re on a different operating system, check out our guides for installing vsftpd on Fedora 22, CentOS 7, and Ubuntu 15.04.
  • We’ll be logging into a Liquid Web Self Managed Fedora 23 server as root.

Step #1: Install vsftpd

Warning: FTP is an insecure protocol. Data is not encrypted, and all transmissions (including usernames, passwords, commands, and the data itself) are in clear text. Consider securing your FTP connection with SSL/TLS.

As a matter of best practice we’ll first update our packages:

dnf -y update

Now we’ll install vsftpd and any required packages:

dnf -y install vsftpd

Step #2: Configure vsftpd

First, we’ll edit the configuration file for vsftpd:

vim /etc/vsftpd/vsftpd.conf

In vim, you can press “a” to enter text insertion mode, and hit the escape key (Esc) on your keyboard to return to command mode. For a refresher on editing files with vim, see New User Tutorial: Overview of the Vim Text Editor. If vim is not installed on your OS, you can follow our tutorial on installing vim at How to Install VIM (Visual editor IMproved) on Fedora 23.

Now, to prevent anonymous FTP access, we’ll change the anonymous_enable setting to “NO”:

anonymous_enable=NO

We do want to allow local users to log in, so we’ll change the local_enable setting to “YES”:

local_enable=YES

If you want local users to be able to write to a directory, you’ll also need to change the write_enable setting to “YES”:

write_enable=YES

For our purposes, we want local users to be ‘jailed’ with no access to any other part of the server. To accomplish that, we simply uncomment the chroot_local_user setting by removing the preceding “#”, so that:

#chroot_local_user=YES

becomes

chroot_local_user=YES

Now save and exit the file with the command:

:wq

At this point, we’ll restart the vsftpd service with the new configuration:

systemctl restart vsftpd

Finally, we’ll set the vsftpd service to start at boot:

systemctl enable vsftpd

That should produce output similar to the following:

[root@host ~]# systemctl enable vsftpd
Created symlink from /etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants/vsftpd.service to /usr/lib/systemd/system/vsftpd.service

Step #3: Allow vsftpd Through the Firewall

Allow the default FTP port, port 21, through firewalld:

firewall-cmd --permanent --add-port=21/tcp

And reload the firewall:

firewall-cmd --reload

Possible Errors

There are a few common vsftpd errors that we’ve already solved for you! Check out the following if you run into issues:
Error: 500 OOPS: vsftpd: refusing to run with writable root inside chroot() [SOLVED]
Error: 500 OOPS: priv_sock_get_cmd [SOLVED]
Error: 500 OOPS: priv_sock_get_int [SOLVED]
 

How To Install and Configure proftpd on Fedora 23

FTP (File Transfer Protocol) is the most common method of uploading files to a server. A number of FTP servers, such as ProFTPD, and FTP clients exist for every platform.

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended specifically for installing the ProFTP server on Fedora 23. If you’re on a different operating system, check out our guides for installing proftpd on Fedora 21, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, and CentOS 7.
  • For this tutorial, we’ll be logging in as root to a Liquid Web Self Managed Fedora 23 server.

Step #1: Install ProFTPD

Warning: FTP is an insecure protocol. Data is not encrypted, and all transmissions (including usernames, passwords, commands, and the data itself) are in clear text. Consider securing your FTP connection with SSL/TLS.

As a matter of best practice, we’ll first update our packages:

dnf -y update

Then we’ll install ProFTPD and any required packages:

dnf -y install proftpd

Step #2: Configure ProFTPD

  1. Now we’ll edit the configuration file for ProFTPD:

    vim /etc/proftpd.conf

    In vim, you can press “a” to enter text insertion mode, and hit the escape key (Esc) on your keyboard to return to command mode. For a refresher on editing files with vim, see New User Tutorial: Overview of the Vim Text Editor. If vim is not installed on your OS, you can follow our tutorial on installing vim at How to Install VIM (Visual editor IMproved) on Fedora 23.
  2. In proftpd.conf, you will want to change the ServerName to the hostname of your server:

    ServerName "ftp.example.com"

  3. Now save and exit the file with the command:

    :wq

  4. To start the ProFTPD service, run:

    systemctl start proftpd

  5. And to configure ProFTPD’s service to start at boot, run:

    systemctl enable proftpd

    That should produce output similar to the following:

    [root@host ~]# systemctl enable proftpd
    Created symlink from /etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants/proftpd.service to /usr/lib/systemd/system/proftpd.service.

  6. Finally, verify your work by checking the status of ProFTPD:

    systemctl status proftpd

Step #3: Allow ProFTPD Through the Firewall

  1. Allow the default FTP port, port 21, through firewalld:

    firewall-cmd --permanent --add-port=21/tcp

  2. And reload the firewall:

    firewall-cmd --reload

  3.  

How To Install Apache on Fedora 23

Apache is the world’s most popular web server, due in part to its power, ease of administration, and flexibility. In this tutorial we will install Apache on a server that doesn’t have a web server or database server already installed.

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended for installing Apache on a single Fedora 23 node.
  • We’ll be working from a Liquid Web Self Managed Fedora 23 server, and we’ll be logging in as non-root user. If you need more information, then visit our tutorial How to Add a User and Grant Root Privileges on Fedora 23.

Step #1: Install Apache

First, we’ll clean up our package data:

sudo dnf clean all

That should produce output similar to the following:

[root@host ~]# sudo dnf clean all
Cleaning repos: fedora stable-arch updates stable-noarch stable-generic
Cleaning up Everything

As a matter of best practice we’ll now update our packages as well:

sudo dnf -y update

Installing Apache is as simple as running just one command:

sudo dnf -y install httpd

Step #2: Allow Apache Through the Firewall

Allow the default HTTP and HTTPS port, ports 80 and 443, through firewalld:

sudo firewall-cmd --permanent --add-port=80/tcp

sudo firewall-cmd --permanent --add-port=443/tcp

Now reload the firewall for the new settings to take effect:

sudo firewall-cmd --reload

You should see a “”success” message after each of those commands.

Step #3: Configure Apache to Start on Boot

First, start Apache:

sudo systemctl start httpd

Set Apache to start at boot:

sudo systemctl enable httpd

That command should produce output similar to the following:

[root@host ~]# sudo systemctl enable httpd
Created symlink from /etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants/httpd.service to /usr/lib/systemd/system/httpd.service.

To check the status of Apache:

sudo systemctl status httpd

To stop Apache:

sudo systemctl stop httpd
 

How To Install Ansible on Fedora 23

Ansible is an automation engine, similar to Chef or Puppet, that can be used to ensure deployment and configuration consistency across many servers, and keep servers and applications up to date. Unlike some other tools, Ansible does not require a client component/agent.

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended specifically for installing Ansible, an automation tool, on Fedora 23. To install ansible on CentOS 7, follow these instructions.
  • We’ll be working as a non-root user on a Liquid Web Self Managed Fedora 23 server.

Step #1: Install Ansible

As a matter of best practice, we’ll first update our packages:

sudo dnf -y update

Now we’ll install Ansible and any required packages:

sudo dnf -y install ansible

Step #2: Verify The Installation

Check the version of Ansible that is installed with:

ansible --version

Which should yield something similar to:

[user@user ~]# ansible --version
ansible 1.9.4
configured module search path = None