Transfer an SSL to Ubuntu 16.04 or CentOS 7

Reading Time: 7 minutes

SSL certificates have become a de facto part of every website. If you don’t yet have an SSL on your site to encrypt data, you should. Rather than showing an extra layer of security on sites protected by SSL, modern browsers instead now display a warning when a website does not have an SSL, essentially requiring sites to maintain their positive image.

When moving from one server to another, what needs to happen to your SSL to maintain your secure status? We’ll cover the basics for transferring traditional and Let’s Encrypt SSLs to Ubuntu 16.04 and CentOS 7.

Note:
This article will address SSLs in Apache specifically, but the same concepts apply to any service that supports SSL encryption.

Can SSLs be transferred between servers?

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How to Create a Self-Signed SSL Certificate on CentOS

Reading Time: 3 minutes

An SSL certificate is an electronic ‘document’ that is used to bind together a public security key and a website’s identity information (such as name, location, etc.) by means of a digital signature. The ‘document’ is issued by a certificate provider such as GlobalSign, Verisign, GoDaddy, Comodo, Thawte, and others. For more information, visit the article: What is an SSL Certificate?

In this article we’re going to be covering how to create a self-signed SSL certificate and assign it to a domain in Apache. Self-signed SSL certificates add security to a domain for testing purposes, but are not verifiable by a third-party certificate provider. Thus, they can result in web browser warnings.

Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended for creating a self-signed SSL certificate and assigning it to a domain in Apache.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed CentOS 6.5 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

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How to Create a Self-signed SSL Certificate on Ubuntu

Reading Time: 3 minutes

An SSL certificate is an electronic ‘document’ that is used to bind together a public security key and a website’s identity information (such as name, location, etc.) by means of a digital signature. The ‘document’ is issued by a certificate provider such as GlobalSign, Verisign, GoDaddy, Comodo, Thawte, and others. For more information, visit the article: What is an SSL Certificate?

In most cases you’ll usually want to use a browser trusted SSL certificate, so a self-signed may not be what you need. In those cases you should buy an SSL from a provider, or get yourself setup with a LetsEncrypt SSL. However, there are times when you just need the SSL for the security provides your connection. In these cases you can generate a self-signed SSL to secure the connection, the only caveat being that you’ll have to accept an SSL warning when you load. Continue reading “How to Create a Self-signed SSL Certificate on Ubuntu”

What is an SSL Certificate?

Reading Time: 1 minute

SSL is used for a variety of purposes. For this article we will be discussing SSL as it used in a web site certificate to secure browsing by a remote client.

A SSL certificate is an electronic “document” that is used to bind together a public security key and a web site’s identity information (such as name, location, etc.) by means of a digital signature. The “document” is issued by a certificate provider such as GlobalSign, Verisign, GoDaddy, Comodo, Thawte, and others.
Continue reading “What is an SSL Certificate?”