SSL vs TLS

You may have first heard about TLS because your Apache service needed to be secured using TLS for a PCI scan (Payment Card Industry: PCI scans are a standard to ensure server security for credit card transactions). Or maybe you noticed that your SSL also mentions TLS when you are ordering the certificate. Beyond where you heard the names, the question is, what is this mysterious TLS in relation to SSL and which of the two should you be using?

So what is the difference between SSL and TLS? Surprisingly not much. Most of us are familiar with SSL (Secure Socket Layer) but not TLS (Transport Layer Security), yet they are both protocols used to send data online securely. SSL is older than TLS, but all SSL certificates can use both SSL and TLS encryption. Indeed SSL certificates are appropriately called SSL/TLS certificates, but that becomes a mouthful. Thus the industry has stuck with calling them SSLs. From here on out I will break from convention and call the actual certificate an “SSL certificate” to distinguish the encryption type from the certificate. SSL has its origins in the early 1990s. The mention of Netscape and AOL should date how old these protocols are as they are the first to coin the term SSL.

 

Green Lock On Webpage

If you look up to the upper left corner of this webpage, you may see a very tiny lock and the word “Secure” written in green. While that doesn’t look like much, it plays a critical part of security. The SSL is what your web browser uses to show that data sent from your computer is safe. SSL certificates create a secure tunnel for HTTPS communication. HTTPS stands for Hyper Text Transfer Protocol Secure, differentiating from HTTP, (Hyper Text Transfer Protocol) which has no SSL present. If you see a red lock or a caution sign in the corner of your web browser, that indicates that the connection is not encrypted. Meaning a malicious third party could read any data sent on that webpage.

A secure connection happens via what is called a “handshake” between your browser and the web server. A simplified explanation of this is that the server and your browser agree on a literal “secret” handshake between each other based upon the type of encryption (SSL/TLS) and the SSL certificate itself. This handshake forms its encoding from the interaction of the public and private certificate key. From that point onward they use this secret handshake to confirm the information sent back and forth is from the authentic source.

This handshake and the accompanying SSL certificate helps prevent a man in the middle attack between customers and a server-side business. A man in the middle attack is where a malicious entity intercepts communication between a server and your computer. The man in the middle receives requests from the user and passes along the information to the server and back again. Data between the end user and the server are read, hence “man in the middle” phrase. If attacked, the Man in the Middle technique will show passwords and other sensitive information. As terrifying as that sounds this attack is only possible if there is no SSL certificate on the site.

As you may have heard, Google and FireFox are phasing out non-SSL/TLS encrypted websites. The change will soon show an explicit warning with the browsers for any site that is not covered by an SSL certificate. The browsers will force an acknowledgment that you want to proceed with an insecure website before showing any content.

For business owners who accept online payments, it is even more critical to not only have an SSL certificate but also enforces the latest TLS versions on the server. In a PCI compliance scan, it requires that the domain only use specific TLS versions.

SSL and TLS each have specific versions which relate to the type of encryption that the SSL certificate will use in the previously mentioned handshake.

The SSL versions are:

  • SSL v1
  • SSL v2
  • SSL v3

Never released to the public but still notated is SSL v1; SSL v2 was an improvement upon SSL v1 but still problematic; SSL v3 fixed some of these initial bugs but is open to attacks through vulnerabilities like POODLE or DROWN (read more on those vulnerabilities here). SSL v3 was at the End of Life in 2015, forever ago regarding the internet.

Modern TLS encryptions cover:

  • TLS v1.0
  • TLS v1.1
  • TLS v1.2
  • TLS v1.3

Each of which addresses flaws from one version to the next. The newer encryptions are just that, more modern and more secure ways to encrypt data for security. The later the release, the better the encoding and the more difficult it is to decrypt by malicious third parties. Conversely, the older versions, like with SSL, have vulnerabilities which can be exploited to collect private data. In many ways, you can think of TLS as the newer version of SSL. Some refer to TLS v1.0 as TLS v 1.0/SSL v3.1.

For the interested technophile, as it relates to the handshake example, we break down the first connection process. The first connection deals with the browser, and a “browserhello” is the first exchange in the handshake. The browser then states the version of TLS they accept, say, for example, everything up to TLS v1.1. The server then replies with a “serverhello,” which is the second exchange in the handshake. The server states the version of encryption that is for the rest of the interaction based upon the first connection.

This interaction should force the newest version of SSL/TLS that both the server and browser are capable of handling. Some outdated browsers do not use the latest versions of TLS. The server is also capable of disabling specific TLS/SSL versions, ensuring all the connections to the server are safer. In this way, new servers should disable the use of all SSL versions and even some of the TLS versions. For example, as of September 2018, PCI certification require all SSL versions and TLS v1.0 disabled.

So back to our original question, what is the difference between SSL and TLS? In sum, TLS is the logical progression of SSL and the safer of the two by that fact. Beyond this, they work in the same fashion, but the newer versions use stronger types of encryption.

If you are interested in getting an SSL for your website, check out our blog to help you make an informed decision on what kind of SSL to purchase.

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