How to Install MongoDB on Fedora 21

MongoDB is a NoSQL database intended for storing large amounts of data in document-oriented storage with dynamic schemas. NoSQL refers to a database with a data model other than the tabular format used in relational databases such as MySQL, PostgreSQL, and Microsoft SQL. MongoDB features include: full index support, replication, high availability, and auto-sharding.

Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended for installing MongoDB on a single Fedora 21 node.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Self Managed Fedora 21 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

Step #1: Add the MongoDB Repository

For a refresher on editing files with vim see: New User Tutorial: Overview of the Vim Text Editor

vim /etc/yum.repos.d/mongodb.repo

Option A: If you are running a 64-bit system, add the following information to the file you’ve created, using i to insert:

[mongodb]
name=MongoDB Repository
baseurl=http://downloads-distro.mongodb.org/repo/redhat/os/x86_64/
gpgcheck=0
enabled=1

Then exit and save the file with the command :wq . You should see an output very similar to the following image:

Option B: If you are running a 32-bit system, add the following information to the file you’ve created, using i to insert:

[mongodb]
name=MongoDB Repository
baseurl=http://downloads-distro.mongodb.org/repo/redhat/os/i686/
gpgcheck=0
enabled=1

Then exit and save the file with the command :wq .

Step #2: Install MongoDB

As a matter of best practice we’ll update our packages:

yum -y update

At this point, installing MongoDB is as simple as running just one command:

yum -y install mongodb-org mongodb-org-server

Step #3: Get MongoDB Running

Start-Up MongoDB

systemctl start mongod

Check MongoDB Service Status

systemctl status mongod

Start the MongoDB Service at Boot

systemctl enable mongod

Summary List of Status Statistics (Continuous)

mongostat

Summary List of Status Statistics (5 Rows, Summarized Every 2 Seconds)

mongostat --rowcount 5 2

Enter the MongoDB Command Line

mongo

By default, running this command will look for a MongoDB server listening on port 27017 on the localhost interface.

If you’d like to connect to a MongoDB server running on a different port, then use the –port option. For example, if you wanted to connect to a local MongoDB server listening on port 22222, then you’d issue the following command:

mongo --port 22222

Shutdown MongoDB

systemctl stop mongod

Be Sociable, Share!
Here's $75, Launch a New VPS Today. Find out why 30,000 customers have chosen our Best-in-Class Performance & 24x7 Heroic Support.