How to Install PHP 7.2 on Ubuntu 16.04

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Using PHP 7.2 on an Ubuntu server is highly recommended over previous PHP versions for several reasons, first being security. Active Support for PHP 7.2 goes until November 30th, 2019 and Security Support until Nov 30, 2020. Older versions like 7.0 and anything 5.6 and below are no longer getting any support and can leave open security holes on a server if they are not replaced. Another main reason to upgrade is the big performance increase over previous versions when PHP 7.2 is installed and is using the OPcache module.  This can greatly decrease the time it takes for your webpage to load! If you are developing a site locally or launching it on one of Liquid Web’s Ubuntu VPS or Dedicated Servers, using PHP 7.2 or newer would be the way to go.

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How to Upgrade Ubuntu 16.04 to Ubuntu 18.04

Reading Time: 6 minutesIf you are still using Ubuntu version 16.04, you may want to consider updating to the latest Long Term Support release, version 18.04. In this post, we will cover what a Long Term Support release is and why you would want to use it. You will also learn the significant changes between 16.04 and 18.04. Last, but not least, you will also learn how to upgrade your server from Ubuntu 16.04 to Ubuntu 18.04.

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Troubleshooting: Too Many Redirects

Reading Time: 7 minutesThe error “too many redirects” means that the website keeps being redirected between different addresses in a way that will never complete. Often this is the result of competing redirects, one trying to force HTTPS (SSL) and another redirecting back to HTTP (non-SSL), or between www and non-www forms of the URL.

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Reset Your WordPress Admin Password

Reading Time: 1 minuteWhether its a hacked site or a lost password, you may find that you are locked out of your WordPress Admin control panel. If you’ve forgotten your password or don’t have access to the email address that the “Lost your password?” link sends to, you still have one more option to access it. Through the database!  WordPress’ database stores all WordPress username, encrypted passwords, and the user’s email address and thus can be edited through a database client like phpMyAdmin. In this tutorial, we’ll be showing you how to edit the email address and change your user’s password.

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Gmail Blacklist

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As one of the most trusted email providers, Google keeps top-notch security by maintaining their own blacklist and security information. With the numerous users the company provides email accounts to, there is an overwhelming amount of data that Google can scrutinize for spam or malicious emails. By gathering this valuable information, rules are created to filter problem content. These rules are highly sophisticated, and as this data is compiled, specific IP addresses are flagged and sorted into what is called a blacklist.

The Gmail blacklist is designed to prevent unwanted spam, malicious content and excessive amounts of emails. Some of the most common reasons for getting blocked are as follows;

  • Large amounts of emails sent from a new IP address.
  • Sudden changes in email volumes.
  • High bounce rates.
  • Spam reports from Gmail users.
  • Incorrect DNS settings.
  • Low sender scores.
  • IP listing in public blacklists.

Gmail’s blacklist may also take information from several public blacklists in order to block malicious/unwanted/compromised IP addresses prior to having any complaints from them. This is a preventative measure intended to keep the lowest amount of spam possible. All things considered, this is the reason your Gmail address will likely have far less unwanted emails or better filtering rules.

 

There are several effects to being on the Gmail blacklist, and the most obvious is that all email from the IP address sending mail will be blocked. This means everything including personal communication, bulk messages, email lists, etc. Not only will it block the problem domain or user, but everything else on the SMTP server attempting to use that IP address.

This poses a large issue for shared IP addresses on any server. But there is hope! Both in the form of preventative measures as well as ways to redeem your IP address and clear it from the blacklist. Before clearing your IP address we highly suggest you review the information to make sure nothing has been compromised. Blacklists often mean an email has been hacked, or there are just poor emailing practices.

Preventatively, you can protect the IP you are using with SPF records should you have no current issues. These records will assist in providing additional verification for the IP address you are using and help keep your IP clean.

 

If you’re already experiencing issues with Gmail delivery, then the first step is to diagnose the SMTP server. If this is a managed environment, it’s best to contact your hosting provider and ask them to review the specific email address having issues. Be sure to include example messages, any bouncebacks you’ve received and any specifics you can remember. (Subject lines, recipients, time of email, etc.) This should help in the retrieval of data.

You can actually get a full copy of the headers of any messages having issues directly from your email client. If you need information on how to do this, you can always check out this article. View full e-mail headers.

If you are having trouble delivering mail and can’t find any fault on your SMTP server, then it’s time to search some blacklists to test the waters. One of the most reputable places to start is mxtoolbox.com. Although Gmail does not state what mechanisms they use to blacklist, this site allows you to search your domain and query a large number of blacklists that should tell you if there are issues coming from your server. Along with cleanup instructions and links to each blacklist, this site is a handy tool for anyone looking to admin their own email.

There are several other sites that can be referenced for blacklist checking, but unfortunately, the only way to get information from Google specifically. If you are not on a blacklist and there are no issues coming from the SMTP server, then it’s time to fill out a Delivery Problem Form. This form asks for basic information as well as any technical information you can provide. The more information you can provide, the easier your process will become for a listing check and possible removal or de-listing.

From there, Google should help you through the rest of the process or provide further information that will move the issues along. But that still leaves us with one question….

 

Well, the guidelines differ depending on what you are using email for. As some of us just use email for personal use the rules are pretty simple. Don’t send malicious content, make sure you don’t attempt to use huge files or send to everyone in your address book every thirty minutes for no reason, etc. These are all suspicious behaviors or hard rules that will either fail or cause issues.

Really we can boil the best practices down to a few important rules of thumb.

  • Do not spam.
    • This includes redirects. Google has specific best practices for pulling email from other accounts, so setting up forwarders in other SMTP servers to shovel all mail over to Google addresses will simply count as spam.
  • Follow the bulk mail guidelines.
  • Pull, don’t push.
    • Meaning import messages or set Google to pull from a third party; don’t forward to Google automatically. (Manual forwarding to share information is perfectly fine.)
  • Use SPF records.
    • SPF records are great added security and verification.
  • Change your passwords frequently.
    • Remember, passwords are vital and knowing the best practices for safe passwords is very important.
  • Watch for, and read bounceback emails.

Following the few suggestions above will keep your SMTP server healthy and happy. When all information intended for Google is pulled via their methods, the likeliness of being blocked for false positives (meaning blocked for legitimate practices done incorrectly) will go down exponentially.

don’t hesitate to contact our support department for more answers! You can reach us via our tollfree number at 1-800-580-4985, or, use our International number at 517.322.0434. You can also open a ticket with us using the support@liquidweb.com email or, open a ticket from your Manage interface. Lastly, there’s always our chat option if you need quick info on smaller issues. Whatever means you choose, do not hesitate to contact us, as we are always standing by to offer our assistance and support! Thanks for hosting with Liquidweb!

 

 

How To Change Website Name in WordPress

Reading Time: 2 minutesYou may have noticed, when transferring a website, that the URL is still stuck on the old site even though you have changed the virtual host file to reflect the new domain name. Or you may see the URL entirely greyed out in your WordPress portal. This mismatch can happen if you can’t change the URL within WordPress to reflect the new site name. In this tutorial, we will show you how to change the URL through the database. Continue reading “How To Change Website Name in WordPress”

Using a Cron Wrapper Script

Reading Time: 4 minutesThis tutorial is intended to do two things: to expand on the Cron Troubleshooting article; and to give an overview of a simple scripting concept that uses the creation of a file as a flag to signify something is running. This is primarily useful when you need to run something continuously, but not more than one copy at a time. You can create a file as a flag to check if a job is already running, , and in turn, check for that flag before taking further action. Continue reading “Using a Cron Wrapper Script”

Managed WordPress – Frequently Asked Questions

Reading Time: 3 minutesWe have collected some of the most common questions that customers ask about our Managed WordPress Hosting platform and housed them in one place.

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