Backup Your WordPress Database with WP-CLI

In this article you will learn how to backup your WordPress database using the wp-cli tool. Knowing how to backup your database is a critical skill to have when running a WordPress site. All your posts, pages, and more live in your database; keeping backups is critical.

You should always take a backup before any major changes to your site, just in case. It’s much quicker to take a backup now and do a restore if you need to, than to find a useful backup when you need it. Continue reading “Backup Your WordPress Database with WP-CLI”

Troubleshooting email in WHM

In this article we will go over the process used to investigate Email delivery issues on a WHM server. This can be helpful when a user is having issues receiving or sending Emails. The Mail Troubleshooter tool provided in WHM works by tracing the route an Email would take when sent to the provided Email address. Continue reading “Troubleshooting email in WHM”

EasyApache 4 & CLI based PHP utilities

With the release of EasyApache 4 in WHM 58 there are various changes to how PHP is managed. The most obvious being that EasyApache 4 brings support for installing multiple PHP versions alongside each other. However with multiple versions of PHP being installed on the server it’s easy to lose track of your command-line based PHP utilities and their PHP requirements. Continue reading “EasyApache 4 & CLI based PHP utilities”

How to Replace PHP GeoIP with MaxMindDB

Depending on the site or application, looking up geographic information related to an IP address can be a pretty common action. When doing IP geolocation in PHP usually the PHP GeoIP extension would be used to facilitate the retrieval of this information. Unfortunately, this particular plugin is no longer actively supported and has not been updated in a number of years.

With the go-to PHP extension of IP geolocation effectively being deprecated, new projects should begin to use the replacement options that are now provided by MaxMind. However, unlike the original GeoIP, which was shipped as a native PHP extension, the new solutions are provided as PHP-based library packages. Continue reading “How to Replace PHP GeoIP with MaxMindDB”

How to Disable MySQL Strict Mode

MySQL’s, and MariaDB’s, strict mode controls how invalid or missing values in data changing queries are handled; this includes INSERT, UPDATE, and CREATE TABLE statements. With MySQL strict mode enabled, which is the default state, invalid or missing data may cause warnings or errors when attempting to process the query.

When strict mode is disabled the same query would have its invalid, or missing, values adjusted and would produce a simple warning. This may seem like the preferred result, however with strict mode disabled certain actions may cause unexpected results; for instance, when the value being inserted exceeds the maximum character limit it will be truncated to fit the limit. Continue reading “How to Disable MySQL Strict Mode”

How To Update Your Contact Information in cPanel

  1. This tutorial assumes you’ve already logged in to cPanel, and are starting on the home screen.cpanel-paperlantern-11-contact--01
  2. Now let’s learn how to update our contact information.cpanel-paperlantern-11-contact--02
  3. Click the “Contact Information” link.cpanel-paperlantern-11-contact--03
  4. Make sure you enter a correct, working email address… as this is how you will be contacted by the system.cpanel-paperlantern-11-contact--04
  5. You should enter a second email address as well, simply as a backup to the first.
    cpanel-paperlantern-11-contact--05
  6. You can choose to be notified when you’re reaching your disk quota, bandwidth usage limit, or email account quota.cpanel-paperlantern-11-contact--06
  7. When ready, click “Save”.cpanel-paperlantern-11-contact--07
  8. That’s it! We’ve successfully updated our contact information and will be notified by email when getting close to our storage and bandwidth limits.

 

How To Modify an Existing Email Account in Thunderbird

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended specifically for setting up an email account in Mozilla Thunderbird 38.3.0 on Mac OS X 10.11.1.
  • While the steps should be similar across platforms and operating systems, they may not necessarily apply to older versions of Thunderbird.
  • For help with general email account settings, see How to Set up Any Email Client.

You can edit an email account that already has been configured in Thunderbird, for example should you decide to switch between non-SSL and SSL settings or change the server’s connection port. You change the connection type between standard (non-SSL) and secure (SSL) by changing the hostname and port for the incoming and outgoing servers.

Note: You cannot edit an existing email account to switch its account type from POP3 to IMAP or vice versa. To change the account type, you must add a new account of the desired type (POP3 or IMAP). Adding a new account with a different connection type should not require you to delete the old one in most mail clients.

To avoid data loss, please use caution any time you change an email account’s connection type or delete an email account. Removing an email account from a mail client also will remove all messages associated with it on the device and, specifically in the case of POP accounts that are not configured to retain mail on the server, there may be no way to recover those messages. If you have any doubt or questions, please feel free to contact Heroic Support® for guidance.

Step #1: Edit Incoming Server Settings

  1. To edit the incoming server, select your email address in the left pane and then click on View settings for this account in the main window.
  2. In the account settings window, click on Server Settings to update the Server Name and Port.incomingedit
    • Server Name
      • SSL settings will use the server’s hostname (e.g., host.yourdomainname.com)
      • Standard non-SSL settings will use the domain name (yourdomainname.com or mail.yourdomainname.com).
    • Port
      • SSL settings will use Port 993 for IMAP and Port 995 for POP3.
      • Standard non-SSL settings will use Port 143 for IMAP and Port 110 for POP3.

Step #2: Edit Outgoing Server Settings

  1. To edit the outgoing server settings, click on Outgoing Server (SMTP) in the left pane, select your outgoing server and click the Edit button.editoutgoing
  2. You can edit the server name and port in the popup window.out2
    • Server Name
      • SSL settings will use the server’s hostname (e.g., host.yourdomainname.com)
      • Standard non-SSL settings will use the domain name (yourdomainname.com or mail.yourdomainname.com).
    • Port
      • SSL settings will use Port 465.
      • Standard non-SSL settings will use Port 587 (depending on your server configuration, you may be able to use Port 25 as well).
  3. Click on the OK button to save the outgoing server settings, then click on OK once more to exit the settings menu and begin using your email account with the new settings.

 

How To Set Up a New Email Account in Thunderbird

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended specifically for setting up an email account in Mozilla Thunderbird 38.3.0 on Mac OS X 10.11.1.
  • While the steps should be similar across platforms and operating systems, they may not necessarily apply to older versions of Thunderbird.
  • For help with general email account settings, see How to Set up Any Email Client.

Step #1: Create the AccountCreate a new account in Thunderbird

  1. From Thunderbird’s main screen, select Email under the Create a new account section, or use the main menu to pull down to File -> New -> Existing Mail Account.
  2. On the window that pops up, select Skip this and use my existing email to proceed to the Mail Account Setup screen.
  3. Here you will enter some basic information about the account:
    • mailacctsetup1sYour name should be your name as you want it to appear in emails that you send.
    • Email address should simply be the email address you’re setting up.
    • Password is the email account’s password.
  4. Select Continue. Thunderbird now will attempt to discover the settings for your account automatically. If autoconfigure is not successful, you will need to configure the account manually.

Step #2: Set Account Type

manualconfig

  1. Select your account type, IMAP or POP3. For its ability to keep email in sync across multiple devices (desktop, laptop, phones and tablets), IMAP generally is recommended.
  2. Now click on the Manual config button to expand the settings window and set your connection type.

Step #3: Set Connection Method

  1. Fill out the Account Information fields using the instructions below as a guide.
  2. Click Done to complete the setup process.
  3. If you’re using standard (non-SSL) connection settings or are using secure (SSL) connection settings and have an SSL certificate installed on your mailserver, that’s all you’ll need to do set up the account. If you’re using SSL connection settings and are using the server’s self-signed SSL certificate, you will have one more step to complete.

newmailaccntsetup

Standard (non-SSL) settings

  • Server hostname column: Enter your domain name (e.g., mail.yourdomainname.com or yourdomainname.com) on both the Incoming and Outgoing rows.
  • Port column:
    • Incoming: For an IMAP connection, select “143”; For POP3, select “110”.
    • Outgoing: Select “25” or “587”
  • SSL column: Select “STARTTLS” on both the Incoming and Outgoing rows.
  • Authentication: This should be set to “Normal password” on both the Incoming and Outgoing rows.
  • Username: Your full email address, not just the part before the “@” symbol, on both the Incoming and Outgoing rows.
Note: If you accidentally set the SSL fields to “None”, you will see a warning popup notifying you of the security risks associated with foregoing any form of encryption. You should click on the Change Settings button to go back and change both SSL fields to “STARTTLS”, or configure a secure (SSL) connection.

Secure (SSL) Settings

  • Server hostname column: Enter your server’s hostname (e.g., host.yourdomainname.com) on both the Incoming and Outgoing rows.
  • Port column:
    • Incoming: For an IMAP connection, select “993”; For POP3, select “995”.
    • Outgoing (SMTP): Select “465”.
  • SSL: This should be set to “SSL/TLS” for both the Incoming and Outgoing rows.
  • Authentication: This should be set to “Normal password” on both the Incoming and Outgoing rows.
  • Username: This is your full email address, not just the part before the “@” symbol, for both the Incoming and Outgoing rows.

 

Step #4: Security Certificate

  1. ssl1If your server has a self-signed (free) SSL certificate installed on the mailserver and you attempt to make a secure connection using Thunderbird, you should see a warning in a popup window such as the one on the right.
  2. If that is the case, you will need to click the Confirm Security Exception button to accept the certificate and complete the setup process.
  3. If you choose, you also may check the box to Permanently store this exception so that you don’t need to continue to accept the certificate each time Thunderbird connects to your server.
Note: A self-signed certificate uses the same level of encryption as a verified certificate, except that it is you who are verifying your server’s identity, rather than a third party. However, if you would prefer to use a third-party verified SSL certificate to cover core services (cPanel/WHM, POP3, IMAP, SMTP and FTP) on your server, you can find instructions for ordering and installing an SSL certificate at Install an SSL certificate on a Domain using cPanel, and you’ll find a guide to installing your certificate on email and other core server services at Installing Service SSLs in cPanel. Should you find that you need any assistance, please feel free to contact a Heroic Support® technician who can assist with obtaining and installing an SSL from the vendor of your choice.