How To Add a DNS Record For Your Hostname in Manage

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended for domain names using Liquid Web’s nameservers.
  • If the main domain uses other nameservers, such as at a registrar, you will need to log in there and add an “A” record for the hostname in the main domain’s DNS zone file. The record should point to the server’s primary IP address.

Whenever you create a new server (or change the name of an existing one) you will need to add (or update) the DNS record for its parent domain.

If the hostname does not resolve, you will not be able to:

  • access WHM, cPanel, or Webmail via the hostname
  • send or receive email over a secure (SSL) connection using a mail client
  • verify the authenticity of email sent by the server (which could result in mail being rejected or flagged as junk by the recipient’s server)

Fortunately, adding the record is a simple process, and you can add the record in your Manage dashboard.

  1. Once logged into your Manage interface at https://manage.liquidweb.com/manage, click on Domains in the left menu and then select the DNS tab in the Domains Dashboard.

    DNS zones

  2. Now, click the [+] next to the main domain name to expand the domain’s DNS record and click the Add New Record button at the bottom. For the host.examplesite.com server, we’ll be editing the DNS record for the main domain, examplesite.com.

    Add a DNS record in Manage

  3. Your hostname will need an “A” record pointing to the IP address of the server itself. In this case, because the server has only one IP address, it is the same as the IP address of the site.

    Add new DNS record

  4. Once you click the green checkmark button, the record will be added and DNS will begin to propagate. Typically only a few hours is needed for this, but it technically can take up to 24 hours to 48 hours for a DNS change to fully propagate globally.

 

How to Resize a Server

Upgrading your Storm® server is a simple process, and can be done in just a few satisfying clicks. Upgrades are a necessity. You work hard on your blog, or ecommerce store, and the traffic grows! Once you’ve optimized your WordPress site or Magento store, reward yourself with an easy upgrade process and increase the available resources to your Storm® by following the steps below. This process can be followed for Storm® VPS or Storm® Dedicated servers.

Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended specifically for resizing your Storm® server.

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How to Enable Two-factor Authentication (2FA)

Pre-Flight Check

  • These instructions are intended specifically for enabling two-factor authentication for Manage users.

What is Two-factor Authentication (2FA)?

Two-factor authentication (also known as 2FA) means that instead of just a password (one factor), you will need two factors (password, plus a rotating authentication token) to login to your Manage account. Only the correct combination of the first and second factors will allow you to log in. Two-factor authentication is more secure than one-factor authentication.

How to Enable Two-factor Authentication (2FA)

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How to Reboot a Server via Manage

Rebooting a server in Manage has been made incredibly easy, and only takes a few clicks. Further simplifying the process, multiple servers can be rebooted at the same time!

Pre-Flight Check

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How to Upgrade Your VPS

Upgrading your Storm® VPS (Virtual Private Server) is a simple process, and can be done in just a few satisfying clicks. Upgrades are a necessity. Let’s face it, you work hard on your blog, or ecommerce store, and the traffic grows! So, once you’ve optimized your WordPress site or Magento store, reward yourself with an easy upgrade process and increase the available resources to your Storm® VPS by following the steps below!

Pre-Flight Check

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What is a Virtual IP (VIP)?

What is a Virtual IP (VIP)?

When you create a virtual IP (VIP) address with Liquid Web you will receive both a Public VIP and Private VIP. The public VIP can be configured on a Storm server just as a non-virtual, or standard, IP would be configured. Connecting to a public service, such as HTTP or FTP, on the Public VIP occurs just as it would on a standard IP.

The Private VIP can be configured on a Storm server’s private interface just as a standard private IP would be configured. Connecting to a private service, such as MySQL or Puppet, on the Private VIP also occurs just as it would on a standard private IP.

So why use a VIP? When utilizing multiple servers, having a VIP is beneficial due to its ability to “float” between servers. This allows the VIP to remain highly reachable in circumstances in which a non-virtual (or standard) IP may be otherwise unreachable. It is possible to move both the Public VIP and Private VIP between Storm servers!

Both Public and Private VIPs can be configured on any server on your Storm account so long is that server is in the Zone where the VIPs were created. Typically software, such as the ones listed below, is used to manage on which server a VIP resides.

Use Cases for VIPs

Here are some of the things that you can do with Virtual IP addresses:

  • High Availability Databases (MySQL, Percona, MariaDB)
  • Non-DNS-based Service Migrations
  • High Availability Web Applications (in tandem with or in place of load balancer)
Examples of Software That Can Use VIPs

This is just some of the software that you can use with Virtual IP addresses:

How to Configure awscli for Use with Storm Object Storage

Storm Object Storage delivers a durable, secure, highly available solution for storage needs of virtually any size. With object storage access occurs via API calls to the object storage cluster, which replaces the need to rely on additional servers for dedicated storage.

Here we use the client awscli to interact with Storm Object Storage. If you don’t have awscli installed then you can follow these instructions: How to Install an Object Storage Command Line Interface (awscli)

Storm Object Storage 101: Command Line
Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended specifically for configuring awscli for use with Storm Object Storage.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Core Managed CentOS 7 server with awscli installed.

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